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Post an unpopular statement about a classic movie


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Showing 176-200 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 10:19:13 AM PST
joeyboy55 says:
Spencer, you are right on with me. Crouching Tiger is my favorite, and I just couldn't stand GWTW. It seems to me it is nothing more, story-wise, than a bloated soap opera.

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 11:37:34 AM PST
MadRaven says:
I find Gone with the Wind grossly over-the-top, as if the actors were not acting for film but on stage for an audience of the nearly-blind and supremely hard-of-hearing, especially Vivian Leigh and Citizen Kane bored me into an almost suicidal stupor more intense than if i had been dipped headfirst into a bucket of the legendary "brown acid" from Woodstock

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 11:49:46 AM PST
I thought Easy Rider was one of the biggest stinkers... I didnt care about the characters or what they did. Electra Glide In Blue was much better for a "biker" movie... I thought 2001 was terrible the first time I saw it. Several years later I watched it again and thought the same thing! Then I bought the book and read it in about two days, and then watched the movie. Now the movie makes perfect sense and I think it really deserves its classic status even more.

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 12:15:14 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 12:40:44 PM PST
ebbjoelj,

I rented "Memento", finished it, and didn't care much for it. I think it is something people say they loved merely because they feel peer pressure to lie. Its only claim to fame is the fact that every scene is shown in sequence from last scene through first. And that was very offputting, and almost seemed the only reason they made the movie, like a gimmick.

And not a very clever or interesting gimmick. How does showing the film in reverse add to the quality of the film or the appeal of the story?

Sure, maybe it's noirish. But I don't think half the people who say they thought it was awesome are being frank.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 12:42:49 PM PST
I'm always puzzled at how a movie that requires an understanding of the book to make it worthwhile should be considered good. I happen to love 2001 for the visual experience and the feelings of isolation it creates... if it takes the book to "explain" any of the things that happened, it's either something the director intentionally left up to the audience's imagination/interpretation in their own vision of the story, or they just failed to communicate something properly (I'm giving Kubrick the benefit of the doubt here).

I guess I'm just saying there's Kubrick's 2001 and Clarke's 2001 and they're not necessarily exactly the same thing - nor should anyone feel pressure to MAKE them the same thing.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 12:53:00 PM PST
I actually genuinely liked Memento. I felt the way the story was told was designed to put us in the shoes of the main character, unravelling the story like he has to unravel his life every day. Given that it's impossible to actually affect our short-term memories, we are forced by the method of storytelling to trust what we are shown as much as we can. Basically it's a built in excuse for the sort of audience manipulation that should quite rightly drive you nuts in most films.

I think it's probably an overrated film. I haven't seen it in 8 or 9 years and have never felt the need to watch it again because it doesn't seem like the gimmick would hold up to repeated viewings. Other movies I liked that are repetitive by nature such as Run Lola Run and Groundhog Day eventually started to grate w/ repeated viewings.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 1:13:38 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 17, 2010 1:14:03 PM PST
"Groundhog Day" gets annoying after repeat viewings--

that's so ironic considering that the film involves the same day repeated over and over and over... lol

I like it a lot but I don't watch it often. It's the sort of 'love story' film (some would say chick flick) that has appealing stuff/ideas/comedy/poignancy for everyone from teens to seniors.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2010 1:50:25 PM PST
stevign says:
Brett:

I agree. Except for the music, Easy Rider sucked so hard the screen imploded. The way in which Hollywood portrayed us Hippies back then was ludicrous. The worst line in the movie is when they're gathered around the campfire at night getting high and Peter Fonda answers a question by taking a toke and saying "Just gettin' my thing together man." I almost threw up on my shoes. What pretentious bullsh**.

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 2:38:54 PM PST
Smidgeon says:
Hey! fun thread...The Sound of Music makes me ill. Julie Andrews = ugh.

ok, that's a real oldie. dating myself here...

also hate anything madcap from that era...Around the world in 80 Days comes to mind.

easy rider was GREAT if you were in the 70's generation, just to see people get high on the screen made us all love it, and then of course the music...

Posted on Feb 17, 2010 3:02:42 PM PST
K. Curley says:
Who Framed Roger Rabbit - fine, it's a technical marvel, but it was deadly boring to me. Went to see it in a theater because a friend said it was great & I'd love it. Some friend. I damn near walked out, but didn't want to loose my money! Several years later I gave it another try but, nope...still sucked.

Posted on Feb 18, 2010 6:27:34 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 18, 2010 6:37:58 AM PST
The Matrix is the best movie ever... about a bunch of mass murderers who kill innocent people unaware of their true surroundings - but hey, they're not the chosen one, so screw 'em! Plus it has the kind of martial arts that made 3 Ninjas look revolutionary (could their movements be any more stiff?), its "breakthrough" slo-mo effect was used in another (slightly better by default) movie disaster a year ago called Lost in Space, the performances were on par with a table reading of an Ayn Rand novel by a group of undead, and the so called story failed to use pop psychobabble in place of character development and it ripped off Dark City left and right yet took twice as long for the "hero" to discover his nature - even when the movie telegraphs this from the first act. How this posterchild excuse of a cinematic curbstomp could be heralded as a "classic" only betrays the wretchedness of fanboyism at its most pretentious peak. Thank the heavens for Don Davis's brilliant score, which can be enjoyed outside of watching that Ed-Wood-exonerating, stillborn slice of skunk puke it's attatched to.

American Beauty, while boasting above average performances, was completely bereft of any meaning outside of its own artifice. Quirkiness and overt context ruled that movie's emotional core and storytelling. So naturally, it won the Best Picture Oscar.

Posted on Feb 18, 2010 7:42:39 AM PST
Kubrik's "The Shining" for me. Watched it the first time before reading the book, bored me to death. Watched it the second time after reading the book (which I love), still bored me to death, and many things didn't make a lot of sense. I mean, the title is "The Shining", and yet the movie has little to do with the kid's "shining" (except to introduce some random kid's visions, like the blood running through the corridor). It's more about Jack Nicholson going crazier and trying to kill everybody. Not that it's a bad thing, but it's a different story, IMO. And what was the point of introducing Halloran's character (the black cook) just to have him killed as soon as he gets into the hotel? In the book he serves some purpose (whether you like the book or not), apart from explaining to the kid what is the "shining". Oh, and the actress who plays Wendy's character is sooooo annoying (well, maybe that's why Jack tried to kill her).

Really, I still don't get why so many people like this movie. Would somebody tell me why, just in case I'm missing something?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 9:07:00 AM PST
*American Beauty, while boasting above average performances, was completely bereft of any meaning outside of its own artifice. Quirkiness and overt context ruled that movie's emotional core and storytelling. So naturally, it won the Best Picture Oscar.*

I'm sorry, I can't even begin to agree with this. I'd go so far as calling it utter poppycock. It's possible the movie is a little inaccessible to some, but for anyone who's ever been in a relationship (not just a marriage, mind) where they've become dominated by their supposed responsibilities, has spent years trodding on their own dignity to please others, lost track of who they are under the weight of the selfishness of others, who has given into expediency for the sake of a surface sort of peace, it's a little masterpiece of character, and not just Lester. In the end, Lester makes the breakthrough, and the ultimate denoument is almost beautiful, in a sense, as it captures Lester in a moment of complete freedom and self-knowledge, before the artifice of his real life can come crashing down upon his newfound self.

I'm sorry if you disagree, or if you missed it, but American Beauty more than deserved its acclaim, in my opinion.

Posted on Feb 18, 2010 9:54:47 AM PST
J. Zwergel says:
Ooh, I can't believe even Casablanca wasn't spared here. Perhaps I missed it, but no one has mentioned Bullitt yet. Possibly the most boring cop movie ever. I think something happened with the new century, or 9/11 maybe, where a lot of movies seem more dated than ever. I used to love classic movies but they don't hold my interest anymore.
This thread seems a little unsure of what a classic movie is. To me it's Studio System, actors under contract, etc. I guess that definition changes over time.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 10:14:42 AM PST
Smidgeon says:
boring cop movies are bad, but racing films or any film with cars featured (except Christine, the new Toyota LOL) make me instantly sleepy and annoyed. like Grand Prix, from 1966 i had to sit (sleep) through that one after prom with my car crazy boyfriend.

but yes, movies from the studio system do age better, thinking of Double Indemnity with Stanwyck as a good example. before the Hayes rules especially.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 10:21:24 AM PST
Yeah, going after Casablanca like that is just daft, sorry. People take potshots just to be different and *gasp* shocking, but no substance.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 11:22:47 AM PST
Gissel,

You said about Kubrick's The Shining:
"Really, I still don't get why so many people like this movie. Would somebody tell me why, just in case I'm missing something?"

I wanted to respond because I am a fan of the movie; I don't expect to change your mind but I want to share thoughts on why I like the movie so much. While the film meandered from the book's core (being a sinister and melancholy character study about a failure of a Dad who is susceptible to supernatural forces), I think the film means a lot to fans because it comes close to being an epic horror film in certain ways.

King's novel is effective in two ways. It seems a metaphor for the problems and demons that plague writers, and it paints a picture of a colossal hotel that comes alive in a macabre manner. But is Jack really seeing ghosts or is it just his madness manifesting itself? Who's to say.

I was engaged with the book and enjoyed it, although it left me feeling sad because it was so vivid in showing us that this family was tattered; and Jack was so hopelessly flawed and doomed.

The movie is a good adaptation (to me personally, not in general) because it doesn't try to be completely faithful to all aspects of the source material. Kubrick left things out and put new things in. He didn't have the technology to do the animated topiary sculptures, so he left that out entirely. The Grady girls, those two ominous British twins appearing in a hallway to young Danny, were not featured in the novel as apparations at all.
And when Wendy sneaks a look at Jack's writing and finds hundreds of pages of the same sentence... that was not in the book either. But that is one of the most chilling scenes in horror movies. Wendy, seeing this revelation, now knows just how mad her husband has become while they've been staying there at the Overlook Hotel.

There's much I could rave over in this film: the offputting classical music used, the cinematography, the use of mirrors as symbolism, the intentional pace. It's not a perfect film by any means, but it's arguably one of the gems of horror film history. When you watch actor Jack Nicholson, his descent into madness is slow and methodical, not instant (as so many people have claimed: "He's already looney from the first scene"). The interview scene early in the film shows a calm and easy-going guy, but eventually this man slowly tranforms into a wide-eyed monster who is hell-bent on chopping his family into pieces. And I think that's the scariest part of the film and the book: a parent who turns homicidal. That thought alone rocks the very foundation of our comfort and security.

So, Jack Nicholson's performance is another reason I enjoy this movie.

I hope I haven't bored you with this extensive post. I do agree with you that the film has some flaws. But whenever I watch it I am instantly drawn in when that music by Wendy Carlos begins and we wend our way over the road and the mountain terrain, towards certain doom. It's the sort of horror film that washes over you and pulls you in. Well, for me it is, but I am no movie critic, just a movie lover.

Also, it is a "you either love it or hate it" movie, most likely... like Suspiria or The Blair Witch Project.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 12:38:18 PM PST
Baron,

Thank you! That was exactly the kind of answer I was expecting. No, you haven't changed my mind (if I watched the movie for a third time, I'd probably find it boring again), but I wanted to know what do people like about this movie.

"And when Wendy sneaks a look at Jack's writing and finds hundreds of pages of the same sentence... that was not in the book either. But that is one of the most chilling scenes in horror movies. Wendy, seeing this revelation, now knows just how mad her husband has become while they've been staying there at the Overlook Hotel."

Well, I actually LOVED that scene, it's so clever and spooky. (And "The Simpsons" parody too :-D) Pity I couldn't get to love the rest of the movie as well.

I'm not a big fan of Jack Nicholson, mind you, though I like his performance in a few movies. Just not in "The Shining". Too over the top *for me* there. I have the same problem with Jim Carrey :-P (BTW, I had a dream about Jim Carrey. His head was shaved, he was holding a big knife, and he was looking at me in a crazy way. Man, THAT was scary!)

I didn't hate "The Shining". I just couldn't connect with it, though I generally like psychological horror. A big loss for me, I suppose :-)

Posted on Feb 18, 2010 1:46:01 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 18, 2010 2:01:20 PM PST
There are so many......
Avatar - the acting may only be alright, but the effects are just awful. Completely unrealistic. I can't believe that we've waited 12 years for Jim Cameron to make another movie, only to be subjected to this. I liked it much better when it was called Fergully. Also much better when it was Pocahantus. And far better when it was called Dances With Wolves.

Titanic - I'm sorry, but I just cannot accept Leonardo DiCaprio as a competant, sexy leading man-type. Just isn't believable.

Godfather - boring. Just....boring.

Scarface - boring. Bad acting. Deniro plays the same character in every movie. Probably the reason that he has never made a movie worth watching.

Pulp Fiction - Sorry, I just don't get it. It is not funny, it is not entertaining. Ridiculous costumes and even more ridiculous hair. Just horrible.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 2:21:14 PM PST
Gissel,

I suppose if people don't care for Nicholson, then that could totally influence how a person views "The Shining". I can see that. He does go over the top in the last quarter of the film (but it fits the cirumstances).

And there are parts of the film that do seem very slow, that drag. The long, quiet chat between Jack Torrance and Delbert Grady in the men's bathroom of the ballroom... that could be like torture to some people. I like it because of the performance by Philip Stone. Very subdued but so chilling.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 2:24:48 PM PST
stevign says:
Spottedfeather:

re: "Scarface - boring. Bad acting. Deniro plays the same character in every movie"

You mean De Niro plays Al Pacino in every movie?

Posted on Feb 18, 2010 2:38:55 PM PST
Derdnik says:
"You mean De Niro plays Al Pacino in every movie? "

Yeah, dont you remember him chasing himself all over the place in "Heat" It kinda ruined the movie for me. Its cute when a dog does it, but a grown man...puhleeeze!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 2:43:26 PM PST
Curious as to how we're getting "Avatar" mixed in with "classics?"

Isn't there a bit of a time factor here? It's got to wear with at least a little age to be considered a classic of any sort, methinks...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 7:51:45 PM PST
Baron,

"I suppose if people don't care for Nicholson, then that could totally influence how a person views "The Shining". I can see that. He does go over the top in the last quarter of the film (but it fits the cirumstances)."

Sure, being locked up in a creepy hotel with an annoying wife, a spooky kid shouting "REDRUM REDRUM", no alcohol, and no TV, can do that to a person :-D

I don't mind subtlety in horror movies. That's why I like Hitchcock. "Rebecca" is one of my favorite movies. (Hey, people, any unpopular statement about that one, just for the fun of it?)
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
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Initial post:  Feb 9, 2010
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