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Customer Discussions > Movie forum

Top Ten Movies To See Before You Die


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Showing 1-25 of 1000 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 4, 2012 12:19:03 PM PDT
A Customer says:
A sort-of "bucket list" for moviegoers. What are the absolute, true essentials of cinema that everyone should make a point of seeing at least once in their lifetime?

Posted on May 4, 2012 12:35:32 PM PDT
emmapeel53 says:
My Top 10 not in any particular order...
1. The Great Escape
2. Ben Hur
3. Lawrence of Arabia
4. Dr. Zhivago
5. Alien
6. The Bridge on the River Kwai
7. Gone with the Wind
8. Saving Private Ryan
9. Titanic
10. Becket

Posted on May 4, 2012 12:46:20 PM PDT
Rebecca
To Kill A Mockingbird
Twelve Angry Men
Irma La Douce
Witness
A Man For All Seasons
It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World
The Time Machine (1960)
The Magnificent Seven
Amadeus

I agree with The Great Escape as well. My favourite war film.

Posted on May 4, 2012 12:49:56 PM PDT
KinksRock says:
"The Godfather" is an easy call. No one should die without having seen it. If you are on the verge of death and have not seen it, you must hold off for 3 1/2 hours and get to a DVD player and see it.

I'm not sure what else is "required" before you die. Plenty of good movies, but if you die without seeing them, I don't think you'll be plunged into the Lake of Fire!

In reply to an earlier post on May 4, 2012 1:39:46 PM PDT
It's hard to pick a current favorite from only 10 directors but here goes:

The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant (Fassbinder)
Scenes From A Marriage (Bergman)
Taxi Driver (Scorsese)
A Clockwork Orange (Kubrick)
A Woman Under the Influence (Cassavetes)
Rushmore (Anderson)
Seven Samurai (Kurosawa)
The Long Goodbye (Altman)
Breathless (Godard)
No Country For Old Men (Coen)

Posted on May 4, 2012 2:03:22 PM PDT
To Have and Have Not
Dreamchild
Double Indemnity
Babe
The Big Lebowski
The Spanish Prisoner
The Maltese Falcon
Singin' In The Rain
All The President's Men
Kolya

Posted on May 4, 2012 5:11:03 PM PDT
Mohammed Messenger of God
Little Buddha
The Greatest Story Ever Told
Kundun
Why had Bohdi-Dharma Left for the East
Seven Years in Tibet
Friendly Persuasion
Lion of the Desert
The Apostle
Focus

Best to cover as many bases as you can.

Posted on May 4, 2012 8:29:11 PM PDT
Jonathan says:
Days and Nights in the Forest
Love Unto Death
Cronaca Familiare
Death in Venice
Nazarin
A Serious Man
Dersu Uzala
Walkabout
There Are Days... and Moons
Day of Wrath
Muriel, or The Time of Return

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 5:47:39 AM PDT
Balok says:
@mr. critic:

> The Bitter Tears of Petra Von Kant

Maybe I misunderstood the intent of the thread. I thought that the list was supposed to be "Movies That You Absolutely Must See Before You Die," not "Movies the Viewing of Which Will Cause You to Look upon Death as a Blessed Release."

Posted on May 7, 2012 5:56:19 AM PDT
Balok says:
In no particular order:

The Battleship Potemkin (Eisenstein)
Safety Last (Lloyd)
Casablanca (Curtiz)
Singin' in the Rain (Kelly/Donen)
The Seven Samurai (Kurosawa)
Orphee (Cocteau)
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (Bunuel)
Persona (Bergman)
Vertigo (Hitchcock)
Double Indemnity (Wilder)

Posted on May 7, 2012 6:42:16 AM PDT
Ben hur
Citizen Kane
Planet of the Apes (1967)
Spartacus
Goodfellas
The Wild Bunch
King Kong (1933)
Double Indemnity
The 7th Voyage of Sinbad
Jaws

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 8:36:06 AM PDT
1. O Brother, Where Art Thou
2. Sunset Boulevard
3. Jaws
4. The Manchurian Candidate
5. Citizen Kane
6. Nashville
7. To Kill a Mockingbird
8. Some Like it Hot
9. Mary Poppins
10. Back to the Future

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:43:38 AM PDT
Balok: If you prefer, substitute any one of these:

The Marriage of Maria Braun
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
The Merchant of Four Seasons
Martha
Fox and His Friends
Fear of Fear
Veronica Voss
Berlin Alexanderplatz
Why Does Herr R. Run Amok

If you like good movies, you will eventually get around to Fassbinder.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 11:05:49 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
JB:Good choices though none would be on my top ten today (and maybe I should see the Coen despite my prejudices). Lelouch an offbeat choice. Gertrud is my Dreyer.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 11:06:48 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
Balok: All fine films but it does look like a Sight & Sound poll from 40 years ago.

Posted on May 7, 2012 11:30:53 AM PDT
7 & 7 IS says:
"The Seventh Seal"
"Big Time"
Carlos Saura's "Carmen"
"The Red Shoes"
"Casting Of The Magic Bullets"
"The Passion Of Joan Of Arc"
"Ivan The Terrible"
"Mata Hari"
"Seven Samurai"
("I, Claudius" '37)
"The Gold Rush"

Posted on May 7, 2012 11:42:31 AM PDT
Savage Lucy says:
Surf Ninjas
The Man with Two Brains
Not Another Teen Movie
Airplane
Dr. Strangelove
Joe Dirt
Bad Santa
The Little Mermaid
Back to the Future
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

Posted on May 7, 2012 11:57:54 AM PDT
1. Amelie
2. Apocalypse Now
3. Blazing Saddles
4. Fargo
5. Gattaca
6. Godfather
7. Pride and Prejudice (Firth/Ehle or Olivier/Garson. Not Seale/Heskin)
8. Shaun of the Dead
9. Shawshank Redemption
10.The Usual Suspects

Posted on May 7, 2012 12:05:10 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Birth of a Nation (although this wasn't the beginning of movies, it's where movies as we know them really began)

Camille (1936) (see it for one of the most luminous performances in film - Garbo in the title role)

The Ten Commandments (though if you've broken most of them and are dying, you might find this one depressing)

Ben Hur. (ditto)

2001: A Space Odyssey (cinema at its purest)

Star Wars (because if you haven't seen it, you don't really understand the last 35 years of movie history)

King of Kings (if you're Christian it will have special meaning and comfort, and if you're not it can't hurt)

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 12:29:55 PM PDT
"Maybe I misunderstood the intent of the thread. I thought that the list was supposed to be "Movies That You Absolutely Must See Before You Die," not "Movies the Viewing of Which Will Cause You to Look upon Death as a Blessed Release."

Is there a difference?

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 12:36:24 PM PDT
Fascinus says:
Which...King of Kings-Ben Hur-Ten Commandments?

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 12:36:46 PM PDT
Star Wars (because if you haven't seen it, you don't really understand the last 35 years of movie history)"

I saw it the day it came out, the first showing, and I STILL don't understand the last 35 years of movie history. In fact, I would be inclined to think of Star Wars as irrelevant to movie history.

By the way, 10 Commandments (either version), King of Kings (the De Mille version) two of the tackiest, laughably bad movies I ever saw. Nick Ray's version was a bit better.

Posted on May 7, 2012 1:04:43 PM PDT
Quexos says:
these aren't my ten favorite, or maybe even ten "best" (whatever that practically means), but the ones I believe are indispensible representatives of cinema as a medium

Grand Illusion
Dumbo
Bicycle Thieves
Wild Strawberries
Vertigo
2001
The Godfather
Blade Runner
Ran
The Lord of The Rings

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 1:45:52 PM PDT
Cavardossi,

re: Star Wars (because if you haven't seen it, you don't really understand the last 35 years of movie history)

It is because of statements like that which is why Star Wars is so over-rated, and why people unfamiliar with it expect it to be the greatest thing since the wheel.

I like the 1977 and 1980 movies: good fantasy moviemaking, that's all. It didn't drastically influence cinema.

Posted on May 7, 2012 2:00:17 PM PDT
Fascinus says:
Baron,
It was hugely influential. It changed the Hollywood industry paradigm. After the renaisssance of AMerican film in the 70s, where directors were often given more freedom than they had been since Irving Thalberg came along, the huge profits of Star Wars and Spielberg's films created a casino mentality. Fewer films were made, at greater expense, looking for the big summer score. Most films were geared to a male juvenile demographic - the lowest common denominator. It was a malign influence- but still.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  139
Total posts:  1803
Initial post:  May 4, 2012
Latest post:  Jul 25, 2012

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