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What is your favorite Clint Eastwood directed film?


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Showing 251-275 of 368 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:05:23 PM PST
zoopraxiscope re Payday

I just found out that its available on dvd and its amazingly inexpensive. I just ordered it the other day. I haven't seen it in many years, but I really liked it at the time of its release. My impression is that its about Hank Williams, but they just didn't use the name. Rip is another actor who can play just about anything and doesn't get a lot of credit for it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:07:39 PM PST
zoopraxiscope: re: "Those who think they can judge the depth of people by the quality of one or three or fifty movies they like"

Its a gift...and a curse.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:12:16 PM PST
kh: re Oscar Wilde

Wasn't he jailed for perjury, for giving false testimony in a slander case?

I have no doubt he was a very clever man, but I don't derive much pleasure from his plays, a lot of aphorisms strung together.

And isn't this an interesting quote: "our enjoyment of being manipulated by films such as Gran Torino"

Personally, I don't enjoy being manipulated at all. As you say you do,you must have a wonderful time at the movies--indeed in life in general. More than enough manipulation out there to go around.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:14:23 PM PST
zoopraxiscope : "movies you watch (sometimes more than a few times) for pure enjoyment, no special knowledge of movies require"

Oh, junk. Why didn't you say so?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:19:32 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Stith: >"Its a gift...and a curse."<

No, it's an illusion, Mr. Monko.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:20:31 PM PST
Jonathan says:
No, not junk. More like soul food. Good from time to time, not all the time.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:23:39 PM PST
Jonathan says:
>Thomas A. Stith says:>"Personally, I don't enjoy being manipulated at all."<<

Because you're not aware of it when you are. All films are manipulation. Some deft and expert, some bruising and painful.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:36:10 PM PST
zoopraxiscope: "No, it's an illusion"

Not if it works--and it does. I can't recall ever being wrong--I might have had to re-evaluate but if so I have forgotten it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:37:12 PM PST
zoopraxiscope" "More like soul food"

Gives me diarrhea, kind of like The Big Lebowski or In Harms Way.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:40:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 2, 2012 3:39:19 PM PST
zoopraxiscope:" Personally, I don't enjoy being manipulated at all."<<

"Because you're not aware of it when you are"

Of course I am. That's what its all about, this movie thing. The best filmmakers take you into their confidence and invite you to make the journey with them, your eyes wide open, and not being manipulated. Have you forgotten so soon the criteria: (1 Being told the truth and (2 not having your intelligence insulted.

Those are the non-manipulative guys.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:42:52 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 31, 2012 5:45:04 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Thomas A. Stith says:>>"I can't recall ever being wrong"<<

I change my word choice from "illusion" to delusion, then.
But I believe you are being honest, in your way. You're one of the last people I'd call a hypocrite or liar on these boards.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 5:47:38 PM PST
"But I believe you are being honest, in your way"

How many ways are there of being honest?

I learned that shortcut to figuring people out a long time ago, at least in college and maybe before. It has saved a lot of time wasted on the wrong people. In fact, its kind of the equivalent of the "ignore" button on these pages. I have had occasion to use that too--haven't you? It cuts down on the frustration levels dramatically. The same can be said of life.

And, by the way, what would be the point in lying HERE, of all places? What could be gained by that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 31, 2012 9:19:32 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 31, 2012 10:26:03 PM PST
KatieHepburn says:
Mr. Stith: All film is manipulation, silly guy. Manipulation of our senses, sight, hearing, indirectly our smells and touch... in order to facilitate some kind of response. Otherwise, why create them for anyone else? The creator would simply be happy to generate them for self. Additionally, without said manipulations, leading to our pleasure, the creator of such 'tripe', as you call it, would not make any money. I have no problem with being 'manipulated' by the films, if that's what you want to call it. When I see a Disney film with my grandchild and enjoy it, I have been ENTERTAINED (or manipulated, as you say) by creative minds and artists, right along with my grandsons. Great! Open your mind, child, enjoy life... Or, don't. I am not ashamed, but I AM intelligent by standards set by our educational system and our Government. I do sincerely feel sorry, at this point, that your mind perceives the human mind and spirit on such a small scale. Enough of this, though. Done.

As far as Oscar Wilde is concerned: I find it interesting that you were hard-pressed to get this information but here are some facts regarding his imprisonment. The father of Alfred Douglas, Wilde's lover, was interfering with one of Wilde's plays to such a point that a legal suit was necessary,which unfortunately, because of their illicit relationship, was turned against him. For that reason, eventually, Wilde was imprisoned. Very easy information to access. Peace out, Stith.

http://www.catholiceducation.org/articles/arts/al0010.html
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jwilde.htm

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 12:45:53 PM PST
Well the same can be said for successes in Film Art Form that continue to crank their groundbreaking style over and over again. Being deliberately different without a sense of how the "new technique" adds or enables new insight (which is what innovations in special effects do...just as innovations in mise en scene is the film school version) is just as hollow, and more annoying, than being a hack.
In other words, whatever shot the original auteur into fame sometimes ruins their later works.
Godard and Brando, for instance.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 12:49:17 PM PST
But who then denounce him for such awful works like Beowulf are definitely with my "in" crowd.
We are still not sure about you Baker.
And Stith will have to read his Finnegan's Wake, while we watch Melodrama films; a subgenre of drama films, characterised by a plot that appeals to the heightened emotions of the audience. They generally depend on stereotyped character development, interaction, and highly emotional themes. Melodramatic films tend to use plots that often deal with crises of human emotion, failed romance or friendship, strained familial situations, tragedy, illness, neuroses, or emotional and physical hardship.

Posted on Feb 1, 2012 12:55:45 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Apr 27, 2012 3:52:21 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 1:08:05 PM PST
Or an anti-populist bias!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 4:48:34 PM PST
sad clown: "Or an anti-populist bias"

Along with egalitarianism, I am nothing if not a populist.

I just don't like bad movies. Hardly a character flaw.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 4:52:43 PM PST
sad clown: " And Stith will have to read his Finnegan's Wake, while we watch Melodrama films"

Its a deal. Let us see who gains the most from the experience.

(Actually, I am surprised to learn that I had ever mentioned Finnegan's Wake here.)

"Melodramatic films tend to use plots that often deal with crises of human emotion, failed romance or friendship, strained familial situations, tragedy, illness, neuroses, or emotional and physical hardship."

And, deal with them in a trite and,uh, Melodramatic way.

Every single one of those elements is effectively and movingly dealt with in, say, "Long Days Journey Into Night", and there is nothing the least melodramatic about it--just shattering drama.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 5:01:22 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2012 5:02:29 PM PST
kh: "As far as Oscar Wilde is concerned: I find it interesting that you were hard-pressed to get this information but here are some facts regarding his imprisonment"

Hmm. Maybe because I find him a minor-league writer, I wasn't really interested in the reasons for his imprisonment. I don't know why O.Henry was imprisoned either--not much care.

"When I see a Disney film with my grandchild and enjoy it, I have been ENTERTAINED (or manipulated, as you say) by creative minds and artists, right along with my grandsons"

Good for you. You and most of America and the world have dutifully plunked down your money and made Uncle Walt and those who came after him filthy rich for propagating a totally false version of Life onto the public. Disney films consistently lie about the world around us, pretend that a dream is a wish your heart makes, pat you on the head and send you home from the theatre telling you that god's in his heaven and all's right with the world. Making themselves rich by telling the masses exactly what they want to hear--whether it has an ounce of truth in it or not.

If you enjoy being lied to, having your intellgence (by standards set by our educational system and government--certainly we can't imagine THOSE institutions to be wrong!) insulted, and being treated like a moronic child, well, enjoy. There are no end of con men out there ready and willing to take your money. And tell you everything is just fine while they do it.

"No one ever went broke by underestimating the intelligence of the American people."--H.L. Mencken

When I was a child I spake as a child..now that I am a man, I put aside childish things. Do I need to quote the source of that?

Posted on Feb 1, 2012 5:30:36 PM PST
KatieHepburn says:
Mr. Stith:

We could go there all day. My life had led me face down in the dirt too many times to discount my tendency towards an affiliation of both fine and foolish things. So I will leave you with this quote from one of my favorite sources: Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him.
(Proverbs 26:12)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2012 10:36:55 PM PST
Jonathan says:
>the sad clown says:
"But who then denounce him for such awful works like Beowulf are definitely with my "in" crowd."<

Alright? I never said I liked 'Beowulf', so...

>>"We are still not sure about you Baker."<<

Good?
Are you with Stith in the Anti-'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' club? I'm not at all sure about what you're not sure about.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 3:37:53 PM PST
kh re:"We could go there all day. My life had led me face down in the dirt too many times to discount my tendency towards an affiliation of both fine and foolish things. So I will leave you with this quote from one of my favorite sources: Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him.
(Proverbs 26:12) "

I think my head is hurting again. And I'm getting queasy trying to figure out what an "affiliation of both fine and foolish things" means.

I guess even your your "favorite source" can be used to justify bad taste. I think there is some irony there that will remain unstated.

Where is my tylenol?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 3:43:19 PM PST
JPB: "Are you with Stith in the Anti-'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' club"

I didn't say I was 'against' it, did I? I said it has some nice use of metaphor--and the calculated destruction of the L.A. trolley car system is accurately lamented and the blame properly placed. But its too pointless to be "anti" it. There isn't enough there to dislike. I do recall that old friend Felix the Cat got short shrift--just a passing glance.

Please! Where is Zoopraxiscope when we need him!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 3:55:34 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Thanks for the longer shrift devoted to explaining your indifference toward 'Rogger Rabbit'. I thought it was another in your growing list of "Anti-Art" specimens.

>"Where is Zoopraxiscope when we need him"<

This is the first I've heard of a desire for me to return to that moniker!
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  50
Total posts:  368
Initial post:  Dec 31, 2011
Latest post:  May 20, 2012

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