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What do you consider the single greatest film ever made, and why?


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In reply to an earlier post on May 19, 2012 5:51:18 PM PDT
Burnt Offerings? That's funny.

In reply to an earlier post on May 19, 2012 5:54:27 PM PDT
You prefer The Princess Bride and the Green Mile to the Good, the bad and the ugly? Wow, way off.

In reply to an earlier post on May 19, 2012 5:59:51 PM PDT
Special effects secondary toe the story? Yeah, right.

Posted on May 19, 2012 6:29:42 PM PDT
P. D. Grove says:
American Graffiti because no film has ever captured a period of time ,especially for teens ,better than Graffiti did. Nearly every teenager lived for real what took place in that movie within a time frame from about 1957 to 1964.

Posted on May 20, 2012 5:46:38 AM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Actually, "American Graffiti", George Lucas' homage to his own youth, is set during a single night in 1962. As such, the musical soundtrack isn't exactly accurate; "All Summer Long", for example (over the closing credits), wasn't released until 1964. But, right, it also represents a more general era. A favorite.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 10:10:34 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 20, 2012 10:11:37 AM PDT
Cavardossi I have more DVD's of Harlow and Stanwyck,then Shearer,have two great nudes of Stanwyck ,her body looks like something Michaelangelo chiseled from stone,they are of her at about 19yrs,when she was still Ruby Stevens,as for Garbo.I don't quite know what to make of her!

Posted on May 20, 2012 10:28:25 AM PDT
JANET NAST says:
Hands down best movie ever made "GONE WITH THE WIND."

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 4:47:41 PM PDT
That be a bold statement, laddie.

Posted on May 20, 2012 9:12:13 PM PDT
Ms. Brentano says:
This question is almost impossible to answer because there are so many great films. However, if I had to pick one it would probably be Lawrence Of Arabia (which has to be seen on a big screen in order to be truly appreciated). Why? Because it was wonderfully directed, has great acting, great cinematography, a great score, and it's an interesting character study. What more could you ask for?

Posted on May 20, 2012 9:48:04 PM PDT
N. forrest says:
In a perfect tie for first place- Ben-Hur (Billy Wilder) and Jesus Of Nazareth.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 8:02:33 AM PDT
BIGJAMFAN says:
american beauty

forrest gump

Posted on May 22, 2012 9:37:14 AM PDT
Just thought I'd post this question: What's the best version of Apocalypse Now? I still haven't seen the movie, and I know there are several versions. Which one is recommended?

Posted on May 22, 2012 9:44:25 AM PDT
2001: It changed the way I looked at movies forever.

Posted on May 22, 2012 9:48:06 AM PDT
The Third Man was impressive,I loved Picnic at Hanging Rock

Posted on May 22, 2012 2:22:58 PM PDT
Pastor: I suggest the Redux version--Coppola's final thoughts on the film.

Posted on May 26, 2012 6:18:07 AM PDT
Bill King says:
Apocalypse Now Redux (an hour longer) is on Turner Classic Movies tomorrow, Sunday night in America, including HD TCM. Got my DVR set (never seen it before)...

In reply to an earlier post on May 26, 2012 9:00:44 AM PDT
stevign says:
PD:

re: "American Graffiti because no film has ever captured a period of time ,especially for teens ,better than Graffiti did."

If Big Wednesday didn't, it came damn close.

In reply to an earlier post on May 26, 2012 9:26:52 AM PDT
The Roaring Twentys with Cagney,Bogart captured that period pretty good."He use to be a Big Shot"

Posted on May 26, 2012 10:19:53 AM PDT
American Graffiti is certainly a film that stands the test of time. Still a favorite. Probably time to watch it again.

Posted on May 26, 2012 10:24:18 AM PDT
F. Ubertini says:
Without any hesitation, The Godfather. A second one would be 8-1/2. A third: Godfather II. A fourth: Gone with the Wind!

Posted on May 26, 2012 4:28:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 26, 2012 4:29:31 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
RE The Roaring Twenties

That closing line is given to Panama Smith, the Gladys George character. Tremendous entertainment. Cagney and the lovely Priscilla Lane got billed above Bogart. Mark Hellinger was a chronicler of that dizzy decade in American history; this was based on his "The World Moves On". Cagney's Eddie Bartlett is based on a real-life character named Larry Fay, who became a millionaire from illegal booze, and lost it all, dying January 1, 1933. (Panama Smith is based on Texas Guinan, who Fay knew.) Expert direction by Raoul Walsh.
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Posted on May 26, 2012 5:20:45 PM PDT
Noah says:
I choose F for Fake, directed by Orson Welles. While I do find the film incredible, and love it dearly, the real reason I chose it is because it defies detractors of the film by showing the worthlessness of experts. The film is, in a single word, untouchable.

Also note: the whole is more important than the sum of the parts.

Posted on May 26, 2012 5:25:12 PM PDT
Citizen Kane

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 4:18:11 PM PDT
Fascinus says:
NF: Looking forward to seeing Billy Wilder's Ben-Hur. Is that the one where Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis dress in drag and race chariots?

Posted on Sep 3, 2012 7:02:33 AM PDT
Anthony L. says:
I believe what you are looking for is clear: Raiders of the Lost Ark is the greatest film ever. Period.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
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Initial post:  Jun 10, 2011
Latest post:  Sep 3, 2012

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