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films about films or Movies about Movies


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Posted on Jul 2, 2012 1:36:38 PM PDT
Waking Sleeping Beauty (a documentary about several films)
Play it Again, Sam (Casablanca)
Fanboys (Star Wars)

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 1:50:32 PM PDT
Gene Bivins says:
One person has mentioned it rather in passing. François Truffaut's Day For Night (La Nuit Américaine) is among the very best movies about movie-making.

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 2:22:21 PM PDT
AJA says:
The Muse (Albert Brooks)
Waiting for Guffman (Christopher Guest)
Final Take (Yoji Yamada)
The Fall Guy (Kinji Fukasaku)

Extras (not a film but a TV series by Ricky Gervais)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 2:41:11 PM PDT
C. J. Vasta says:
... is a clipshow. There's nothing about filmmaking in it. Perhaps you should try Abbot and Costello go to Hollywood.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 6:09:08 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
Hey ABBBBBOOOOOTTTTTTTTTT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 6:09:24 PM PDT
Green Meanie says:
Blue Movie.

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 10:08:35 PM PDT
Balok says:
I mentioned _The Muppet Movie_ in passing as a movie that knows it's a movie. Now that I think about it, it's also a movie about making a movie -- Kermit's whole quest is to go to Hollywood so that he can make a movie, which IIRC ends up being the movie that you've just seen about him going to Hollywood to make a movie.

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 10:09:26 PM PDT
Balok says:
Do movies like _Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid_, into which clips of old movies are inserted as part of the action, count?

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 10:11:33 PM PDT
Balok says:
It's been a long time since I've seen it, but in _Last Tango in Paris_, isn't Maria Schneider's boyfriend making a documentary about her?

Which reminds me -- when I saw _Last Tango in Paris_ at the old UC Theater (may it rest in peace), it was on a double bill with _Inserts_, which is also a movie about movies (I think -- it's the only movie that I've ever walked out on).

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 6:12:13 AM PDT
Severin says:
Balok, I listed "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid" not because it's about making a movie but because it constantly throws other movies in our faces. It's stitched together with older movies so we're always aware that we're watching a movie as opposed to being drawn in to something original. The film is self-aware, it never lets us forget the medium.

Posted on Jul 3, 2012 12:12:01 PM PDT
Soap Dish was a funny movie. It was about a soap opera rather than a movie, but it was still funny.

Posted on Jul 4, 2012 5:27:38 AM PDT
CQ merits a mention.
Blake Edwards' "The Party" begins at a shoot on a remake of 'Gunga Din'.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 4, 2012 6:01:08 AM PDT
Balok says:
@JB:

> 'The Hudsucker Proxy' and 'Intolerable Cruelty' are probably semi-covert comments on Hollywood.

_Rear Window_ has been interpreted as being a movie about watching movies.

Posted on Jul 4, 2012 9:28:08 AM PDT
Severin says:
"Scrooged" is a movie about making a live TV special. It's full of movie and TV references and it skewers the mentality of the entertainment industry. Frank wants to own Christmas, he wants viewers to be scared to miss the Scrooge special.

Posted on Jul 4, 2012 10:36:20 AM PDT
Green Meanie says:
The Ray Harryhausen Chronicles.

Posted on Jul 4, 2012 11:04:10 AM PDT
D. Whicker says:
"Hugo" is a love letter to movies, based on a book by Brian Selznick. In my opinion, it is much better than "The Artist." At the end of "Hugo', which I found enthralling, I wanted more. At the end of "The Artist", also a love letter to movies, I was ready for it to be over. The makers of "The Artist" had done their homework, it looked and felt like an old silent movie, but "Hugo" was also a love letter to invention and creativity.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 4, 2012 4:49:27 PM PDT
Jonathan says:
@ Balok: "_Rear Window_ has been interpreted as being a movie about watching movies."

--------------

Then of course we'll have to make mention of Haneke's 'Funny Games', in addition to 'Peeping Tom', 'The Tenant', Bigas Luna's 'Anguish', et al.

Why are movies about watching movies so often about grisly murderers and other horrors?

Two of the very best movies about watching movies are: 'The Spirit of the Beehive' (two Spanish girls after their Civil War who become entranced by Whale's 'Frankenstein'.) And Terence Davies's 'The Long Day Closes'.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 4, 2012 10:55:44 PM PDT
Balok says:
@JB:

> Why are movies about watching movies so often about grisly murderers and other horrors?

I suspect it's at least partially because movies about watching movies frequently satirize the nature of the vicarious (but essentially passive) experience of the viewer's projecting himself into the action. Even if that action is a grisly murder. That's certainly part of the point of _Rear Window_ -- Jimmy Stewart is a voyeur, which is supposedly a bad thing, and yet we the viewers are just as much voyeurs as he is, and we the viewers sympathize with him and not the people whose lives he is monitoring (only one of whom has done anything criminal). (One advantage of having put homas Stith on Ignore is that I won't have to read the rant that inevitably follows any post that says anything positive about a Hitchcock movie.)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012 4:37:34 PM PDT
'The Bank Dick' is great - then there's "Never Give a Sucker an Even Break", most of which has Fields outlining his latest bizarre screenplay.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 10, 2012 3:38:38 AM PDT
Balok says:
@Vincent G. Macek:

> then there's "Never Give a Sucker an Even Break", most of which has Fields outlining his latest bizarre
> screenplay.

How could I have forgotten that one, which inter alia demonstrates beyond any possible doubt that Groucho Marx's famous comments about Margaret Dumont were clearly not meant to be taken seriously.

This thread was supposed to be in a saloon, but the censor cut it out.

Posted on Jul 10, 2012 10:15:30 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 10, 2012 1:07:05 PM PDT
7 & 7 IS says:
What's Up, Tiger Lily?

Posted on Jul 22, 2012 3:58:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 22, 2012 4:30:20 PM PDT
If animated cartoons can fit into this thread, over at Warner Brothers, Daffy Duck had at least four trips through Hollywood, most notably in 'The Scarlet Pumpernickel' where he pitches his script with him as an Errol Flynn-style hero. Director Chuck Jones in the '50s tended to cast him in traditional movie-hero roles, acutely self-aware and constantly failing to live up to the part.

Posted on Jul 22, 2012 5:44:00 PM PDT
Did I forget Who Framed Roger Rabbit? My mistake.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 22, 2012 6:38:55 PM PDT
Justin says:
@D. Whicker I could not agree more. I thought The Artist was one of the most overrated Best Picture winners in recent memory (and that's saying quite a lot). It just felt so...gimmicky and cheap.

Hugo, on the other hand, was such a visual achievement, plus the performances in the film were superb. I really, really enjoyed Hugo, and I'm convinced that if it weren't for the stigma surrounding "kids' films" at the Academy, it very well could have won Best Picture.

Posted on Jul 22, 2012 8:17:57 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 22, 2012 8:28:38 PM PDT
K. Rowley says:
I Was A Teenage Moviemaker - Don Glut's Amateur Movies (2-Disc Special Edition)

Rubber [Blu-ray] - sort of..

Awesome, I Shot That
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  29
Total posts:  60
Initial post:  Jul 1, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 22, 2012

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