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In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 4:06:02 PM PDT
T.A. Stith:

We first got a 17" TV in 1952. In our location we received one VHF channel. On Saturday mornings the programs didn't start until 9:00 AM. The first thing they ran was a half-hour film called "The Johns-Hopkins Science Review" -- very exciting stuff. Sometimes I watched the test pattern for 15 minutes before the programs started. "Watch Mr. Wizard" (the wonderful Don Herbert) started at 10:30 which I watched religiously. Strange, watching a science program religiously. Bob and Ray did a hilarious take-off on Mr. Wizard called Mr. Science: "Today, Sandy, we're going to look at the miracle of gas refrigeration!" I have several Bob and Ray recordings that I treasure. They were often on NBC's weekend broadcast, "Monitor." That broadcast, Today, Tonight and Home (with Arlene Francis and Hugh Downs) were all the developments of Pat Weaver who was, or would be, the president of NBC. He was the father of actress Sigourney Weaver. I just discovered that her uncle was Doodles Weaver, an actor/comedian who participated in several of Spike Jones' comedy recordings. He played a small part in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" as the man who rents the motorboat to Tippi Hedren.

The foregoing is what is sometimes called a stream of consciousness (or insantity, I'm not sure which.)

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 4:52:11 PM PDT
cavardossi:

I have given up trying to figure out why some things get released and other do not. Seems stupid to me. I mean, if sales weren't what they expected, how many sales are they going to get with the episodes sitting in their vaults! Its hardly even on repeats any more.

Actually, I thought it went downhill-Dennis Franz got tiresome after a while. He was better at supporting than the lead. I don't think I even saw the final season.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 4:56:25 PM PDT
bgtaylor

WATCH Mr. Wizard. How did I forget the real title? You know a few years ago--3 or 4 maybe--Don Herbert showed up on the Science Channel and hosted a marathon of episodes--introduced each on. He was in his 80's and looked great. Sadly he passed away not long after. But, that voice! Man, in some ways that voice IS the voice of my childhood.

Can you imagine kids today watching a science show? But, it was interesting! (He said they got some things wrong, but an awful lot right.)

I think it was followed by Sky King and Annie Oakley!

I must confess (don't tell anyone) that a couple of years ago I bought a boxed set of Howdy Doody episodes. And I enjoyed them immensely!

I remember Doodles Weaver. Another suicide I am afraid.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 5:31:10 PM PDT
Bruce: I had a 1965 red Ford Mustang. Like any idiot I traded it for a 1970 Chevy sedan and from then on nothing but lemons until somebody
told me to buy a Honda or Toyota. Since 1987 just two Honda Civics.

Paid 600 bucks for my first VHS player,all metal with the pop-up holder,paid 300 bucks for the second one.

I can remember when people fixed things or gave them to people who could,now you just throw something away and get a new one.
Did not know they were holding the episodes of NYBD Blue,come to think of it never did see a box set.
Looking for some old Warner Brothers film noir,see on Amazon they are bootlegs or OKed by Warner Brothers. That is what I call them,DVD-RW
or whatever format.
Any body for a box set of the "The Biggest Loser" !? or "The Apprentice" what is considered quality TV today.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 5:39:43 PM PDT
Dennis Weaver; FeeedleBomb the race call take-off with Spike. Then somebody did an R-rated take off that was even funnier.
You can see some of Spike on You-Tube. His band had to be great musicians to keep up with all that craziness going on,a lot of people
don't realize what concentration it took to do those routines.

Posted on May 25, 2012 5:40:07 PM PDT
"Any body for a box set of the "The Biggest Loser" !? or "The Apprentice"

Oh! OH! OH! I can hardly wait! I'll start saving my money now.

How about a boxed set of the complete Judge Judy?

Posted on May 25, 2012 5:50:24 PM PDT
Hikari:

Just bought a copy of Beautiful Boy. Got a good price too, but I passed up the John Thaws to get it.

Wouldn't this make a great double bill with "Elephant"?

In reply to an earlier post on May 28, 2012 2:53:14 AM PDT
Balok says:
@Bruce G. Taylor:

> "Today, Sandy, we're going to look at the miracle of gas refrigeration!"

Today, Johnny, we're going to see what happens when we boil water right here in the laboratory!

In reply to an earlier post on May 30, 2012 8:08:08 AM PDT
Warren:

Actually the word was "Beetlebomb" used by Doodles Weaver who did the take offs on race track announcers on the Spike Jones records.

I remember, when I was around twelve, my uncle taking his son and me to see a live performance of Spike Jones' stage show. As I recall it was a lot like the Olsen & Johnson zany style of stage shows with members of the cast running through the audience, etc. It a pity that neither of the the Olsen & Johnson Universal films, "Hellzapoppin" and "Crazy House" are currently available on DVD.

Posted on May 30, 2012 9:34:40 PM PDT
Balok says:
@Bruce G. Taylor:

> Actually the word was "Beetlebomb" used by Doodles Weaver who did the take offs on race track announcers on the Spike
> Jones records.

Are you sure? It always sounded like "Beeblebaum" to me.

In reply to an earlier post on May 30, 2012 10:29:24 PM PDT
According to Wikipedia, the name of the nag that wins the race on the Spike Jones parody recording of Rossini's William Tell Overture is spelled as "Beetlebaum." Never having seen the word in print until now, I always heard it as "Beetlebom" or "Beetlebomb."

Posted on May 31, 2012 5:47:29 AM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
I always heard "Beetlebaum", pronounced "Beetlebowm (as in the pained exclamation Ow!), in those hysterically funny recordings.

In reply to an earlier post on May 31, 2012 9:49:58 AM PDT
brucegtaylor:

Speaking of which, what has happened to the movie version of Hellzapoppin? It was all over tv when I was growing up but seems to have vanished. It would be interesting to see if its still funny.

Never thought Spike Jones was funny (nor Ish Kabibble) but do you recall the Stan Freberg comedy albums? We used to play his spoof of Lawrence Welk over and over. ("Someone turn off the bubble machine!")

What was the comedy team one member of which slit his throat? Wheeler and Woolsey maybe?

Posted on Jun 4, 2012 2:08:40 PM PDT
Regarding Amazon orders from Goodwill: I thought I would take a chance and ordered three dvds in the last couple of weeks from Goodwill Southern California and Goodwill Arizona. They were marked as 'acceptable' and 'good'. Each one of them was at least "very good" and one better than that.

So I have few qualms now about ordering from them. They probably intentionally list at a lower quality as not to disappoint anyone. All things being even, I'd rather buy from a Goodwill anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 2:52:00 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 4, 2012 2:52:36 PM PDT
Hikari says:
TAS--
I purchased a 'used' (very slightly) copy of Sherlock Season Two and it arrived today in record time!

My seller will be getting an excellent rating from me. Apparently they watched Disc One and didn't even take Disc Two out of the case. Guess it wasn't their cuppa! I can see how Irene Adler would put the fainter-hearted viewers off a bit.

Glad to hear your Goodwill experience was a . .good one. I bought a couple of CDs once from my local Goodwill and they were still in the cellophane. It's a crapshoot . .but maybe they only list the best items they have online and leave the scuffed ones in the store for a nickel.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 3:32:02 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 4, 2012 3:33:46 PM PDT
Hikari:
Goodwill is doing their bit to help me catch up on Morse episodes I missed--or do not remember that well. So far, so good anyway. Another arrived today, along with Into the Blue.

"Wolvercote Tongue" was almost as good as "Deceived by Flight". I tried to answer the guy's question about Midsomer Murders on the other thread, but it really doesn't measure up to either of the Dexter series. Its lightweight in comparison, but I didn't want to say that.

Actually, your now-beloved Sherlock is lightweight in comparison.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 4:23:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 4, 2012 8:00:12 PM PDT
Hikari says:
@TAS

Despite my recent enthusiasm for the new Sherlock, I agree with your assessment--enjoyable as they are (to me, with your criticisms noted, and not totally dismissed, either), "Lewis" is still my gold standard. I like it the best of all the British series on Mystery! that I have thus far seen, and that is saying a lot, because I have seen and enjoyed many. "Lewis" is even better than "Foyle's War", and yes, "Midsomer", too. "Wire in the Blood" is a close second, perhaps . . .but if I had to pick one, it'd be "Lewis". "Blue Murder" is also a strong contender, but in a showdown between Manchester and Oxford, Oxford gets the nod.

"Sherlock" is a bit of a stunt in comparison, yes . . . but having waited 2 years for more episodes, I see they were (mostly) not wasting their time while they were away. It is doubtful that Sherlock will have as long a run, even. I look for 6 more episodes at the most. This decidedly youthful take on SH has a limited shelf life as it is . . .with 2 years between series, I can't see the two leads hanging around Baker Street forever, and the producers have already displayed that they didn't intend a slow burn for the the series, coming out of the gate with Sherlock's Biggest Three in only the second season. Sherlock 3 will go into production in January and after that, who knows . . .?

Neither do we know what they will do with "Lewis". I am hoping for at least a season 6 . . .7 is a nice ecclesiastical number. It all depends on how long Kevin Whately is still having fun, I guess. I will miss our 'other' dashing detective duo when they pack it in--hope it's a better goodbye than Morse got.

I watched a number of seasons of Midsomer via Netflix several years ago--I got all the way through Sgt. Troy's tenure and I believe a couple years worth of his successor. Then I was bored with them. The rapport with our two detectives was always what I tuned in for, and honestly it's the same with Lewis and Sherlock, too--character and dialogue are always more interesting to me than sheer plot alone. After the departure of Sgt. Troy from Midsomer, I felt like DI Lewis would feel if he lost Hathaway and had to make do with a series of replacements. Maybe still good moments, but not the same. And while Mr. Smith thinks the plots far more complex than "Lewis" or "Morse", I didn't really find them so. When they were good, they were compelling and when they were less good they were . . .cosy. "Foyle's War", while I love the meticulous recreation of the period & the inimitable subtlety of Michael Kitchen tends to veer toward the tediously cosy in its less stellar moments . . going for 'cutesy' a bit too often, particularly where Honeysuckle Weeks is concerned.

I never lose sight that Hathaway and Lewis are urban coppers (as urban as Oxford gets, anyway). In the pastoral landscapes of Midsomer and Hastings, that gets a bit blurry sometimes. Both have more of that 'TV' quality as opposed to the feature-film quality I get from the "Lewis" productions. Say what you like about "Sherlock"--it has really great production values . . and "Lewis" is that shiny and cinematic for me in a way the others aren't, quite.

I'll always be fond of DCI Barnaby and Sgt. Troy, but they have been supplanted. No going back now.

Posted on Jun 4, 2012 4:43:42 PM PDT
Peridot says:
I do wish they were all available for streaming. *sigh* It takes such a long time for discs to arrive. We're down to watching PSYCH now. Oh, for INSPECTOR MORSE or something else juicy while awaiting my medical appointments. At least my son's having fun.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 5:51:17 PM PDT
Mona: You can always watch reruns of Monk. I still watch them, third of fourth time now. I always get a laugh out of them! I still have not watched Psych. I can't get past those interminable Corbin Bernsen flashbacks!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 6:00:27 PM PDT
Hikari:

Did you read what I wrote about Morse on that other thread? After I read what you wrote about Lewis, I didn't think I could add much to that part of his question.

I must remember to answer this on Wednesday. I am out of here now and have to have a consultation with the surgeon tomorrow. You should watch more Morse, really. I just watched Wolvercote Tongue and its as good as Promised Land and Deceived by Flight. These are really in depth, well written episodes. And John Thaw is just superb.

(I meant to mention that between Max and Dr. Hobson there was another female pathologist who I had forgotten. I think I got the two of them confused.)

So strange seeing Kevin W. so young! And so guileless.

Foyle's War seems to veer from year to year in quality. Yeah, sometims its too cozy, but I guess that in an odd way, those years are fondly remembered by elderly Brits, the camaraderie and all that. But when it gets serious and dark, it can be very powerful. And there's always Michael Kitchen.

Shame on you for being down on Honeysuckle while raving about messers Fox, Parker, Cumberbatch and company. She is awfully, awfully cute you know. I didn't see you complaining about Julian Ovenden!!! How sexist of you! (How's Anthony Howell anyway?)

As for Sherlock's production design, I did mention that it looks spectacular in HD.

As for your friend's comment about the plots of Midsomer being superior, I think I had better comment on that in a personal email. Sometimes people's preferences become transparently not for the reasons they say.

Hey, I guess I did answer this after all.

I have a new Morse to watch tonight, I am glad to say.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 4, 2012 8:17:52 PM PDT
Hikari says:
>>>Shame on you for being down on Honeysuckle while raving about messers Fox, Parker, Cumberbatch and company.

Well, hardly 'down' on Honeysuckle. She is a refreshingly original find--a modern girl, sort of a grown-up, human-sized Tinkerbell who looks quite at home in the 1940s. She's had some good scenes. Quite often, and you cannot dispute this, they give her little to do than to be all bright-eyed and 'tup, tup and cheerio!' The perkiness sometimes gets a little twee. In the last episode I watched, Sam confronts a despondent soldier in a bar who has brought a gun and is waving it around. After identifying herself as 'with the police', she gets the gun away from him, only to end up shooting out the lights accidently. Driving DCS Foyle doesn't exactly make her a sworn member of law enforcement, and she's obviously had no training around firearms. If DCS Foyle is going to keep her on, perhaps gun saftety lessons are indicated. She's rather skittish to be handling weapons.

Please don't call it 'shame'--it's known as 'heterosexuality', thank you very much. I'm a girl; I notice the boys . . .go ahead and shoot me for that, but you'll have to get in the second round after Mr. Smith. He now hates Benedict Cumberbatch, and I feel responsible. ;-)

>>>She is awfully, awfully cute you know.

As buttons, I know.

>>>I didn't see you complaining about Julian Ovenden!!! How sexist of you!

Sure, DCS Foyle has a good-looking kid, but no shakes on the old man. And since you asked . . .

>>>(How's Anthony Howell anyway?)

I'd take the wounded warrior earnest sargeant over the brash, cocky flyboy, thanks very much. That was cold, the way his wife abandoned him after his injury. I've got a weakness for those earnest, put-upon sargeants. I could see Anthony Howell doing Sherlock, actually---a Victorian version. He's got the look. Does Sgt. Milner ever get a promotion? He is too bright to keep on laboring forever as a DS.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 9:16:46 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 10:39:06 AM PDT
Hikari re Honeysuckle:

In the contemporary interviews she looked really pretty, much nicer than in those forties uniforms.

Yes, Milner gets a promotion,but, its at the end of the war, after Foyle retires, as I recall. Milner appears very little in the last season. But there is one episode when Foyle runs into him and Milner treats him rather cavalierly and allows his sergeant to be rude to Foyle and Foyle gives him heck for it too. Very interesting take on their relationship.

In discussing the differences in mysteries, its curious how Foyle falls somewhere between Morse/Lewis and the Prissy Murder She Wrote type series. Its definitely serious, but its leads are such solid people that they serve as a buffer between the stories and the audience.

Interesting example of what I feel is the strong type of mystery. In a Morse episode "Absolute Convictions" Morse and Lewis are investigating a murder in a minimum security prison. After some initial snarkiness with the attractive (of course) lady governor who complains that the investigation is undermining her tenuous hold on her job, Morse confesses that he admires her attempts to rehabilitate rather than merely incarcerate.

In the end, the case is, of course, solved, but the killer is a rather sad, even sympathetic character, much more so than his victims and, as the warden predicted, Morse's revelations will no doubt result in her losing her job and a stricter, crueler regime taking over. Morse is helpless to do anything about it.

This is a perfect example of what these series do so well. Yes, the murder gets solved, but, unlike genre clones, that doesn't really solve anything. The world stays the same.

Life on planet Earth, not on Planet Fiction.

Posted on Jun 6, 2012 12:53:27 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 12:54:13 PM PDT
Hikari says:
>>>Yes, Milner gets a promotion,but, its at the end of the war, after Foyle retires, as I recall. Milner appears very little in the last season. But there is one episode when Foyle runs into him and Milner treats him rather cavalierly and allows his sergeant to be rude to Foyle and Foyle gives him heck for it too. Very interesting take on their relationship.

Interesting. I guess earnest Sgt. Milner grew tired of doing Foyle's scut work & not receiving what he felt was a fair portion of his boss's attention and commendation. Foyle dispatches Milner hither and yon doing (ironically) most of his legwork, and Milner gets around admirably on his artificial limb. He even got to go undercover in the last episode as a building supplier. But more often than not Milner's left on his own at the station while Foyle and Sam go gallivanting 'round Hastings in the car. She fulfills the confidant role for her boss that would normally be filled by his junior officer, ala Lewis to Morse, or Hathaway to Lewis or Sgt. Troy to Barnaby. Sgt. Milner is on the outs of the 'circle of two' that is Foyle and his driver, and so there has not been a developing relationship of cameraderie that we usually see between a DS and his guvnor. Foyle is very hands-off with Milner, even more so than Morse was with Lewis. It is a businesslike relationship, professional without being collegial, and perhaps Milner carried resentments over being so marginalized in his boss's regard. Sam is very likeable, but she does overstep her bounds in the power structure. Milner gets the shaft as a character because of their overreliance on Foyle's Girl Friday.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 1:12:22 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 1:13:28 PM PDT
hikari re Foyle

I have been rewatching Foyle's War every Sunday night on PBS here and you are correct. I hadn't thought about it before but Milner is increasingly given short shrift inthe stories. Even Sam got to go undercover before he did.

Anthony Horowitz said in an interview that it was after the series started that they decided to beef up Sam's role because Honeysuckle and Kitchen just worked so well together and were improvising the camaraderie anyway. I guess this came at the expense of Anthony Howell.

We are in 1942 now, the Americans have arrived, and poor Julian Ovenden hasn't been in a single episode all season! Oh, he did a voiceover for his 'dear John' letter to Sam, but that was it.

To Milner's credit,he does apologize to Foyle for not treating him with enough respect. It was interesting because we like both characters so much and they usually were so good with each other. It wasn't a key plot element or anything, but an interesting character sidelight to the story.

One disappointment in the series this time around is its lack of perspective on the era. They seem to completely buy into the stiffupperlip emotions of the time.

And, as you might suspect, as little as we see Milner in the last few episodes, there is still plenty of Honeysuckle to go around. (that sentence sounds vaguely nasty.)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2012 7:31:08 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 6, 2012 7:35:45 PM PDT
Hikari says:
Yes, as appealing as Honeysuckle is, Milner got rather screwed over on her account. Her scenes with Kitchen are delightful, and it's obvious that he regards her as a sort of substitute daughter, since he is rather estranged from Andrew, and besides being a girl, Sam is as opposite from his son as it's possible to be--sunny and open and solititous where Andrew is guarded, moody and spends as little time with his old dad as possible. Sam's a great character, but a real-life counterpart to her wouldn't insert herself into police business with such regularity as they allow her to do--after all, her job is drive Foyle around, not discuss ongoing investigations or get involved in them. She got the job because she was good with machines, not because she's a trained police officer. I have no idea of the size or relative importance of Hastings at the time, but actually, as Detective Chief Superintendent, Foyle would not as a rule get so personally involved in the investigations, were he a real-world holder of this title--his job would be to stay back at the station and administrate, hearing the reports of the officers under his command--like his counterpart DCS Innocent. I know Hastings is probably smaller than Oxford and environs, but Foyle acts like a DI, with Sam as his lieutenant. If the station at Hastings is so small that they can spare DCS Foyle to go walkabout to crime scenes personally, then wouldn't it make more sense to partner him with Milner and have Milner drive him around? Sgt. Troy always got stuck driving, didn't he? And Lewis drove Morse if they weren't in the Jag. Driving one's guvnor around is part of a sargeant's duty. Obviously titles are fast-tracked there in the country. They should have made Milner a DI, with his own sargeant and then it would have made more sense for him to be on his own for so much of the investigative work.

But if Foyle were stuck back at the office administrating, there wouldn't be nearly enough for Mr. Kitchen to do. It's definitely more dramatically interesting to have him as active as possible, but the Foyle-Sam relationship is central and everyone else is merely afterthought. No one suffers this more than his sargeant, who should by rights be his right-hand man. Foyle has a right-hand woman instead. They should have had Sam take the police exam and made her a DC at least if this was the route they were pursuing. Then she'd technically report to Milner, too, and as it is, he's rather in no-man's land.

I was unfamiliar with Anthony Howell before this project. He has a very avid, intense look that would make him perfect as a more traditional Sherlock Holmes interpreter, and his body type is right, too. He might be a little too soft-spoken and accomodating to be Sherlock, but then, "Foyle's War" didn't really give him a great range of opportunity to show what he could do, other than wear period clothes sharply.

In the first episode, when he comes home wounded from the front and Foyle visits him in the hospital, I figured we were at the start of another great DI-DS partnership. It didn't really turn out that way, because Sam stole the show away from Paul, quite literally. Anthony Howell is a good sport, but perhaps he, and not the writers, decided to make himself scarce the last season, due to lack of meaningful scenes. I saw a joint interview with Howell and Weeks and they seemed to get on fine . . but there is a bit of professional respect involved if one's character gets dissed to the degree they did with Anthony's.

To be frank with you, I don't buy the Andrew-Sam romance. She's very cute, but one wouldn't think--alluring enough--for our cocky flyboy. Their vibe together is more brother-sister than romantic. They're of an age and all, but I could more easily see her nurturing side being attracted to Milner, the abandoned amputee. His wife was a real piece of work. I feel like the producers had so much good stuff there with Paul and his backstory and they didn't really do anything with it.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  42
Total posts:  826
Initial post:  Mar 6, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 7, 2012

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