Customer Discussions > Movie forum

What persons of color would you like to see a film about?


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1026-1050 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on May 17, 2012 9:51:24 AM PDT
KatieHepburn says:
Well th-a-a-a-a-nks.

In reply to an earlier post on May 17, 2012 10:26:57 AM PDT
Ms. Brentano says:
@Hikari - Because some white people are racist and want to dominate everything, including what gets shown onscreen. I just wanted to maintain the focus on this topic since those individuals that you mentioned have been amply discussed elsewhere.

Posted on May 17, 2012 5:43:48 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Samuel L. Jackson as Nat Turner.

Posted on May 17, 2012 5:46:58 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
I want to see a film about the great vaudevillian Bert Williams.

I ain't never done nothin' to nobody.

Posted on May 17, 2012 5:56:25 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Williams is a very important figure in the history of entertainment. He was the most famous, highest-paid black entertainer of his time. He bridged the gap between the minstrel-show era and more modern entertainment, making many recordings. He starred in the Ziegfeld Follies for several years, which was the height of show business at the time, regardless of race. "Nobody" was his signature song.

Posted on May 17, 2012 9:05:36 PM PDT
D. Bennett says:
Carma Chan: Good...please write the story and tell it to the world. I know I would see that. Bless him.

Mr. Stith: Wayne Williams...ah yes...I would love to see a movie made about him and the child murders juxtaposed with how kids came up missing for years in the South and they were taken and killed by Klan members...this was why so many people worried that someone from the Klan had taken/killed all those missing kids in Atlanta. An interesting twist (for the movie) would be if the klansman didn;t have just a racial motive but was like a serial killer. That might make it "thrilling" enough to be "box office".

Posted on May 17, 2012 9:09:36 PM PDT
D. Bennett says:
Mickey Ryan: Summer of Sam was good. He did another movie about New York "happenings" too, I believe the 9th hour or something. I usually have a sharp memory but I have been burning the candle at both ends, so I can't remember it. It had a backdrop of the 9/11 tragedy.

My FAVORITE Spike Lee movie is CROOKLYN, with Clockers being a close second. I have honestly never seen Girl 6 or (gasp) Do the Right Thing. I was in high school then and just beginning my love affair with science fiction.

Posted on May 17, 2012 9:15:40 PM PDT
D. Bennett says:
yes mickey, if I had scrolled further (argh, this lack of sleep) the 25th Hour...please everyone I am not really an imbecile, I am just in need of sleep

Posted on May 17, 2012 9:16:40 PM PDT
D. Bennett says:
Bert Williams is a great person...

Posted on May 17, 2012 9:19:31 PM PDT
D. Bennett says:
thomas stith: dreamchild sounds like my kind of film, too....Ian Holm is amazing....and yes, being nice is a problem in writing - especially biographies.....the more insane someone is, the better it is....

In reply to an earlier post on May 18, 2012 1:13:34 PM PDT
dbennett: re "this was why so many people worried that someone from the Klan had taken/killed all those missing kids in Atlanta."

One wonders if Wayne William mightn't have been railroaded because it was in the interest of so many people that the killer NOT be white.

In reply to an earlier post on May 18, 2012 1:17:15 PM PDT
dbennett:

Dreamchild has been released relatively recently on, I believe, the Warner Archive series. Its worth checking out. Iam Holm is really heartbreaking in it.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 4:09:56 PM PDT
C. Palmer says:
all of the Swampers were white - they sure sounded like they weren't, though!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 4:15:40 PM PDT
C. Palmer says:
Etta will get coverage in the documentary "Sweet Home Alabama: the music of Muscle Shoals"

Posted on May 21, 2012 4:49:01 AM PDT
Just discovered Sessue Hayakawa. Considered one of Hollywood's first sex symbols of the silent era, and he was Japanese. You probably remember him most from Bridge Over the River Kwai, but he led a very interesting life.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 7:35:11 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 21, 2012 8:54:32 AM PDT
Though I don't think the majority of the people who've bothered to comment on this thread are racist (a charge I only level upon people after long observation), many people are completely oblivious to the plight of people of other than European persuasion when it comes to media portrayal. So to them it makes perfect sense to ask stupid things like "What would you say if I was to start a thread called what white people would you like to see a film about?" as if it would make me take offense. The answer is I wouldn't think anything, in fact I could probably name quite a few, and I wouldn't feel the need to be high-handed about it. The point is I could watch well-made Hollywood films about and starring white people for several years. The films made about or starring other groups would take considerably less time, and this is in a country where race, religion, and all that isn't suppose to matter, or mean anything, but it certainly seems to be relevant when it comes to who gets screen time. The fact that people look at movies everyday and try to pretend there is no inequity, or even try to justify it is what really irks me more than anything. The point that they say we should all be colorblind in one breath and still try to justify the lack of films about people of other races and cultures just proves that they're expecting those groups to follow some ideal that they themselves aren't attempting to follow.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 8:39:26 AM PDT
KatieHepburn says:
Well said, James...

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 10:27:56 AM PDT
" The fact that people look at movies everyday and try to pretend there is no inequity, or even try to justify it is what really irks me more than anything."

I think you have missed the point, as I tried to say a while back. The core issue is not what films are made about, but the quality of those films. The subject is secondary to the quality.

However, within your hypothesis, the problem is not the intentions, good or bad, of these filmmakers, who generally--with some exceptions--make films about what they know best, as that is what interests them. White middle class males--which most filmmakers are--are not going to make a lot of films about cultures they are not a part of.

The problem is the system, in that it, for the most part, is geared toward the same kind of filmmakers. Expand the kind of people hired to make films and you expand the content of those films--hopefully.

There have to be some Ang Lees out there somewhere, they just aren't given a chance.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 10:29:10 AM PDT
"and this is in a country where race, religion, and all that isn't suppose to matter, or mean anything"

Your entire thread here should tell you the amount of truth in this concept. Its one of those things America gives lip service to, knowing darn well it isn't so.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 9:14:57 AM PDT
D. Bennett says:
Thomas A Stith: Hiya. Didn't introduce myself..

"One wonders if Wayne Williams mightn't have been railroaded..."
This so hard for me because I don't know what to believe. At the time, I was a very young child. My famiy was convinced that Williams didn't do it, because of things that had happened in the past. Believing them and not having access to the Internet and other "discovery" tools available now, I thought he didn't do it either.

Later, I read and saw a documentary and thought he probably did do it.

Now, I am not sure of any of it. I have no idea. I know it is possible, if not probable, but I know it is equally likely that he was propped up as the killer. Look at that mayhem with the Central Park rapist and now we all know (or at least anyone paying attention to the minor coverage it got in comparison) that those boys in the park didn't do the actual rape and beating of that woman.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 9:18:03 AM PDT
D. Bennett says:
James Smith: Yours was a great post. My belief is that what we seek, accurate portrayals and diversity, will not come from those outside our communities,at least not on a large scale. A more militant friend of mine once told me (as I was circulating a petition for something to do with a television show) that these things were created for the majority and they want to see what they want to see. The older I get, the more I think about that. I think most of it will come from the theater but people of color will have to show their own portrayals and keep certain traditions alive.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 9:23:29 AM PDT
D. Bennett says:
J N Smith:

What my grandest hope is for technology to be developed that would reduce costs to make films. If I had the capital, I would work on this on a massive scale. This would greatly improve the ability for anyone to make films, for studios to produce and distributors to distribute. It would really help a lot of people.

Unfortunately, as I am sure you know, there are other "strongholds". There are unions that have goals that must be satisfied. I am actually pro-union, in most cases. However, what bothers me about all the various movie industry unions is that they cannot recognize that independent and lower budget productions simply cannot afford all the staff and such. I thought about bringing about litigation that would lower the staff quotas for lower budget productions or those productions that have "educational" value, but I could studios using this to get around their own quotas - which is why unions have a problem with this, in the first place.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 10:32:58 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 23, 2012 10:35:20 AM PDT
Unions are a big hindrance to black independent's on the two coasts, because it prevents both actors and crew from becoming actively involved. I live in the South in a right to work state so I don't have that problem, but unfortunately I don't have access to all the facilities available to indies on the west coast either. Even so, I still believe that for independents this is the best of all possible times to be a filmmaker, both from the production end and the ability to get your work seen. The only snag is how to break even, or make a decent profit so that you can keep doing it.

I just started another thread titled: Do Mainstream Audiences Only Go To Films about Ethnic Cultures If They Are Directed By White Directors? Weird topic, but when you look at the highest grossing films that star, or are about minorities (in the U.S. at least) they have always been helmed by white directors, Slumdog Millionaire being probably the biggest foreign non-foreign film out there. The playing field is definitely uneven, but it never has or never will be. You just have to be aware of the lay of the land. When I was working in Alaska, I played pool in a bar on the docks. I saw many a game won because a player knew how the tables leaned in a high tide. Ethnic filmmakers are going to have to be just as savvy.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 12:40:25 PM PDT
d bennett re Wayne Williams

I think the bottom line here is that Williams did not get a fair trial. He was tried in the media and the judge allowing "evidence" of crimes he wasn't even accused of to be admitted is almost unbelievable. Most people wanted him to be guilty, just to put it behind them--and for it not to be a white person.

He may well have been guilty, but he didn't get a fair trial. We have a nice history of this. Bruno Hauptmann, Sacco and Vanzetti and the Rosenbergs may have all been guilty--but we know now that evidence was suppressed or manufactured to insure their conviction.

As far as criminal 'justice' goes in this country, convictions are more important than arriving at the truth.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 1:03:24 PM PDT
You know, I'm beginning to see a very good big-screen film about Williams that is also about our justice system. This is the kind of film that could really be "universal" in a way that everyone says black themed films lack, in that it is about something bigger than the obvious subject.
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Movie forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  158
Total posts:  1197
Initial post:  Dec 22, 2011
Latest post:  Jan 31, 2014

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 14 customers

Search Customer Discussions