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Posted on Jun 2, 2011 1:58:03 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 2, 2011 1:59:53 PM PDT
If any one is interested in a different take on "Nutcracker" try the Australian Ballet version "Nutcracker, The Story of Clara".Nutcracker- The Story Of Clara.....There are a couple of different venders for it. The first 10 minutes are a little slow, but the overall ballet is very, very good. Tells the story from an aged ballerina's point of view. Very heartwarming. It's not for kids, however, The mice are too scary, and made to look like Russian Red Army solders. The dream shows Clara in training, her competitions, dancing in the Imperial Theater, her world travels, and ending up in Australia at the beginning of WWII. Some truth to that. One of the best "Dance of the Snowflakes" I've ever seen. All of Tchaikovsky's music is used.

Posted on Jun 2, 2011 3:53:09 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Richard Rawls- Graeme Murphy

I agree. I own Graeme's Nutcracker & it's enjoyable.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 2, 2011 8:16:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 2, 2011 8:30:46 PM PDT
I might as well continue adding to this thread.
I have two of the Trockadero DVDs, and they are fun to watch. It's unbelievable how good those guys are. Not many women are better, and I think that if they ever got serious, few primas would be able to out perform them. The first time I saw Ashton's "The Dream" by the ABT, was the first time I ever saw a man dance on point. At first I didn't believe it was a man, and tried my best to find a woman trading places with him, but that was Brigado-Young dancing the part of the ass. You see, I was new to ballet when I first saw "The Dream".
One thing though, the parody of "The Dying Swan" by the Trocks is pure sacrilege. I wonder what Maya Plisetskaya thinks of that. Has everyone seen Maya Dance "The Dying Swan"at the age of 68 on the DVD "Essential Ballet"? By the way, Maya Plisetskaya is undoubtedly the ultimate dying swan, but the first ballerina I ever fell in love with, Nina Ananiashvili, has arms just as boneless as Maya's. Nina is also the first Russian ballerina whose name I learned to spell w/o having to look it up. Maya Plisetskaya was second. I fell in love with HER too. At my age, I can have as many lovers as I want w/o raising eyebrows.

Posted on Jun 2, 2011 8:26:46 PM PDT
I'm not really a balletomane, but can any of you tell me if a DVD of any reconstruction of the Nijinsky choreography of "Le Sacre du Printemps" has even been made commercially available? I taped the Joffrey revival YEARS ago, but it looks grainy and the final dance is ruined by broadcast dropouts.

Posted on Jun 2, 2011 10:36:28 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Dace Gislard

Yes, it's called Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes: The Firebird/Le sacre du printemps, available on both DVD and Blu-ray. it came out about a year and a half ago and got nice reviews. The Sacre is a reconstruction of the original choreography. I saw that telecast, too, years ago and I ached all over by the time it ended. Such contortions of the human body! This disc is sold by Amazon and you can find it here on the Movies/TV page. Just enter Le Sacre du Printemps ballet and there is it. Good luck.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 10:56:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 10:57:00 AM PDT
Dear Cavaradossi,
Many thanks for your reply. After posting my question, I found two YouTube videos (one of which is clearer than the other) and downloaded them. I followed your suggestion, and found the AMAZON reviews of "Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes" were VERY variable! It's a shame Joffrey won't release the video commercially, and it's also a shame that I can't find the very informative documentary that accompanied it--guess I'll have to rely on my old VHS tape for that! Again, many thanks, and give my regards to Tosca.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 11:10:02 AM PDT
C McGhee says:
Richard Rawls- Essential Ballet

Own it.

>>Nina is also the first Russian ballerina whose name I learned to spell w/o having to look it up.

Well Maya is as easy as Nina & spelling either correctly is hardly a claim to fame. ;>)

>> At my age, I can have as many lovers as I want w/o raising eyebrows.

Is there one sneaking up behind you? OK, I apologize for that one.

I do believe that the Trocks would smile at the sacrilege comment. I love the Pas de Deux.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 11:13:35 AM PDT
C McGhee says:
Dace Gisclard- Nijinsky

this?

Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes: The Firebird/Le Sacre du Printemps

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 11:25:46 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 11:28:09 AM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Dace Gisclard

I believe I also have that Joffrey Ballet reconstruction of Le sacre on video tape somewhere in my huge collection of things taped off the air over the decades, but I'm not sure where it is. i'ld really like to see it again. BTW, in case you may be wondering why my name isn't spelled correctly(and thanks for spelling it correctly), when I was entering it for use in Amazon's forums I didn't notice until after I had entered it that I left out the third "a". I've never figured out how to correct it and have actually grown a little fond of the misspelling. Embarrassment about it, though, keeps me from posting on the opera forum, a real trial for me since opera is my favorite art form. Floria sends her regards.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 11:30:04 AM PDT
C McGhee says:
Cavardossi- Floria sends her regards.

How about faunia?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 11:36:40 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 11:43:00 AM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
C McGhee----Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 11:56:36 AM PDT
Dear McGhee,
Yes, I looked up the AMAZON reviews and they are WIDELY variable--some love it, some hate it. To be honest, I'm ambivalent about Gergiev, but then I'm a strong advocate of not taking performers' names as an automatic guarantee that I will like something they've done. Re Gerviev's video of Prokofiev's "War and Peace," take a look at the dancing in the ballroom scene--the tempi are so fast I'm amazed the dancers could keep up--NO ONE does social waltzing THAT fast!

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 11:58:48 AM PDT
Dear Dilger,
You raise in interesting question--has there ever been a video of Nijinsky's choreography for "L'apres-midi"? If I remember correctly, there were some excerpts in the film "Nijinsky," but it wasn't complete.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 12:02:25 PM PDT
Dear Cavaradossi,
What's a letter or two among friends? Yes, try Googling "Joffrey Sacre" and see what comes up. I downloaded the better-looking one of the two with ROXIO. True, it jumps at the joins of the 10-minute fragments, but it's still preferable to my grainy old VHS with incessant dropouts in the final Danse sacrale. There is a site offering the full 30-minute film unbroken, but they require opening an account--heaven knows what sort of invasions of one's privacy THAT entails!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 12:06:55 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Dace Gisclard----[On the missing videos] A good question. Just like we were discussing on the lack of a DVD for "Nutcracker the Movie", there are too many excellent films somewhere that are being withheld for public viewing. Malice, apathy, poverty? In the documentary "Dancing for Mr. B", over a dozen clips were shown from performances of the NYC ballet. Where are the complete productions?

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 1:50:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 1:52:00 PM PDT
Dear Dilger,
Very true! Not to get TOO far off the subject of the thread, but Universal botched its initial release of "McCloud" which is only NOW being released by MADMAN in Australia! And WHEN are we going to get "Raintree County"? I don't get it. Surely there are videos of important Balanchine productions--Agon, for example--why aren't they available for study?

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 2:05:13 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Gisclard and Dilger

Years ago, the early eighties I believe it was, PBS aired a 90 minute dance special in which Nureyev payed tribute to Nijinsky by dancing the older star's choreography to Petrushka, Invitation to the Dance, and Afternoon of a Faun. It was riveting hour - great music and great dancing. The costumes, scenery, and dance looked as though they had "stepped" out of the old photographs of Nijinsky in the roles. I thought I once saw a VHS available of this program listed slmewhere, but it may not have been a legit copy. Anyway, I video recorded it when it was broadcast and, about once a decade it surfaces in my stacks and stacks of things taped off tv over the decades. When I come across it, I drop everything to watch it again. The next time I come across it I must copy it to a DVD. BTW, when it came to the infamous moment near the end of Faun I doubt I would have caught what it was if I hadn't previously known about it from reading about Nijinsky. I remember thinking, THIS caused a scandal at the premiere? But then, maybe Nureyev toned it down from the way Nijinsky did it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 2:12:24 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Cavardossi----I just finished listening to "The Firebird (original 1910 version)" and am getting ready to put "Petrushka" followed by "The Rite of Spring" on. Synchronicity?

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 2:25:23 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
B.A. Dilger

As one who fervently believes it's never possible to hear too much Stravinsky, I say, right on and time splendidly spent!

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 2:43:10 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 2:47:31 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
I want to mention two other very fondly remembered tv complete ballet telecasts. Again, we have to go back the eighties for these. PBS aired a evening length production of a ballet on Shakespeare's The Tempest with music by Paul Chihara. It was a production of the San Francisco Ballet and a splendid thing it was. Naturally, I have looked for a video or DVD of it, or a production of by any other company on video, with no success. Fortunately, I video taped it, but the sound, pre hi-fi ( remember those days?) is wretched. The other, believe it nor not, was an original ballet choreographed to Mahler's longest symphony, the Third. There was no discernible story line, other than suggesting the
Birth of Man on to maturity. There was a male lead and the whole ballet called for a fairly large group of dancers who assumed more or less importance in the various movements. The production utilized Leonard Bernstein's early 1960's NYP recording of the symphony, which was played in full. The ballet was actually longer than the symphony as the choreography called for dancing in the lengthy silences between the movements. The dance was more modern than classic and the whole two hour performance left me stunned, yet exhilarated. Other than that it was danced by a German company, I knew nothing more about it. That, too, exists on one of my video tapes with wretched sound. Sigh. Did anyone else experience these or know if any commercial release of them ever existed?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 3:26:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 3:27:19 PM PDT
Dear Dilger and Cavaradossi,
For that matter, I remember a beautiful ballet telecast danced to Holst's "The Planets"--the whole thing looked like a Maxfied Parrish painting. I've never been able to turn it up anywhere--not even YouTube.

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 3:44:35 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 3, 2011 3:47:47 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
That's the thing of it, my memories of PBS and our local artistic center Queen's College had a greater variety of dancing then today. While I didn't watch much television in the eighties, there was a constant influx of high culture. This was before cable was widespread and the arts channel Ovation existed. And the dancing, chamber music, and art events at Queens was always active and affordable. Nowadays it seems concentrated into high-buck venues.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 5:07:08 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
B. A. Dilger- I used to know French much better

I'm not sure if your referrring to a spirit (which I think you are) or if your referring to a medieval music festival. You can forget me typing French. Je suis meurent lentement.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2011 5:12:21 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Dace Gisclard- NO ONE does social waltzing THAT fast!

well I used to be a meth head (speed freak) & we danced quick. It didn't feel really fast while we danced but I watched once & it was a blur of motion. Worked great for cleaning, not so much for dancing. :)

I don't have anything of War & Peace.

Posted on Jun 3, 2011 5:12:24 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
B.A. Dilger

I discovered just before last Christmas that Comcast in my area had brought back Ovation just in time for broadcasts of multiple versions of The Nutcracker. While that was fun, there hasn't been anything comparable since, and I check it every day. No operas, or ballets, or concerts. What happened to that channel?
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  35
Total posts:  1067
Initial post:  May 24, 2011
Latest post:  Feb 8, 2014

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