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Movies that did NOT age well...


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Showing 126-150 of 738 posts in this discussion
Posted on Jul 27, 2012 5:41:50 AM PDT
Not to deviate from the forum's subject but I just saw Criterion's new Blu-ray release of Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" (1945) with Rex Harrison, Margaret Rutherford, Kay Hammond, et. al. which I've been waiting for for a hell of a long time. It's a beautiful rendering of the film and includes a generous piece about Coward's life and career. One cannot help but say that he was exceptional -- in every way.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 5:57:32 AM PDT
D. Duarte:

Well you knew that the two men of the cloth were both going to have to be sacrificed to save the possessed little girl. That was a must and the theme of the picture. I suppose the film is more effective if you actually believe in any of that sort of thing.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 6:10:11 AM PDT
Plan 9 is as good as it ever was :)

Glen or Glenda is better.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 6:18:22 AM PDT
"...knows the solution to their problem about 15 minutes in and spends the rest of the movie wondering, "Just how stupid *are* these people, anyway?" "

***spoiler***
Abandon ship and blow it up. And then have The [Weyland] Company garnish your wages for the rest of your life to pay for the ship (plus the Alien that they wanted.)

Well, I guess being a slave is better than being dead (?)

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 6:50:18 AM PDT
most of Garbo's movies have not aged well

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 7:37:02 AM PDT
Michael J. Mason

I find "Grand Hotel" and "Ninotchka" still quite watchable.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 7:55:14 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
The Matrix sequels were always bad.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 8:10:00 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
I don't think VERTIGO has aged well. The romance between the main characters seems ridiculous.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 8:45:58 AM PDT
KinksRock: Saying that the romance is ridiculous in Vertigo is like saying the romance was great in Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 8:47:41 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
Not sure I'm following . . .

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 8:51:45 AM PDT
Look at any list of the greatest films of all time. Vertigo is almost always placed near the very top. And why is this not a surprise? The dialogue is phenomenal, the suspense is as good as any film ever made, and the romance draws you into the characters, especially once you know that Scottie is being tricked.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:08:23 AM PDT
Pastor of Muppets: "Vertigo" ".... dialogue is phenomenal,...."

Really? For one example, at the inquest after Madeleine's phony suicide, the judge makes such unbelievably disparaging, unkind and biased remarks to Scottie that would have gotten any real judge bounced off the bench that day. I call that very heavy-handed script writing.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:11:52 AM PDT
Bruce G. Taylor: They didn't have any proof that Scottie committed any kind of murder.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:12:27 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 27, 2012 9:13:09 AM PDT
KinksRock: (Vertigo)

Many people, including Hitchcock apparently thought James Stewart was simply too old be in a romantic involvement with Kim Novak. "Vertigo" was the last time Hitchcock partook of Stewart's services.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 9:13:02 AM PDT
"The Blues Brothers" makes me wonder not only how did I find this funny but how did ANYBODY find it funny? If it's been more than 20 years since you've seen it I dare you to try to sit through the whole thing now.

I think people were so hypnotized by television in the late 1970's and early 1980's that they wanted all of their movie experiences to have those exact same conventions.

Now it's pretty much the opposite and even half hour shows aspire to have a more cinematic look and tone.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:13:23 AM PDT
And Stewart's performance was marvelous.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:26:13 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 27, 2012 9:34:21 AM PDT
Pastor of Muppets:

Of course they didn't, but the judge repeatedly and sneeringly remarks on Scottie's weakness and fear of heights that would be, in real life, considered condescending, biased and downright cruel that would possibly be grounds for legal action against him or at least a formal complaint on Scottie's part. The audience already knew how miserable Scottie felt after what he believed to be Madeleine's suicide and his inability to prevent it and we didn't need to have it drilled into us with an unrealistically scripted statement by a judge at an inquest.

It's rare moments like that in Hitchcock films that sometimes make me question their feeling of authenticity.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:31:54 AM PDT
Bruce: A fear of heights doesn't make him responsible for her death. And it was a much different time back then, almost 60 years ago.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:35:29 AM PDT
Pastor of Muppets:

You seem to be missing my point.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:36:50 AM PDT
Not really.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 9:40:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 27, 2012 9:41:16 AM PDT
I agree Bruce and Queen Christina,if one believes in Past Lives,Garbo sure was like Queen Christina

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 10:11:03 AM PDT
Not to subvert the question, but what decade in films seems to be the least dated to modern audiences.

I'd say stuff filmed in the 50's and 60's look extremely dated. The 70's is hit and miss, but a lot of stuff filmed in the 40's is extremely watchable. The 80's stuff is fun, but is dating badly, and the 90's were just meh.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 10:21:04 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 27, 2012 10:22:01 AM PDT
MJEH says:
I have to agree with "James N Smith" about the eighties. "Fast Times at Ridgemont High", even though it was a very cool movie in 1982, (makes me feel old when I watch it) seems dated. And as much as the first "Back to the Future" is in my top 5 movies of all-time, it is certainly retaining its 1985 feel.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012 10:55:23 AM PDT
Yeah, Back to the Future as much fun as it was, was very much a product of the 80's. It just seems there was a kind of mind set about the tone of films (especially comedies )that just screams 80's. Then there was all the John Hughes stuff, which now seems to me very 80's in that kind of "I'm speaking for a generation" vibe that I didn't care much for when I was watching it in the 80's. I kinda' like the Breakfast Club though.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2012 11:00:04 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 27, 2012 11:01:30 AM PDT
Dee Zee says:
Although I love the film and was very glad it was restored and issued on Blu-ray, How the West Was Won is very dated in so many ways.

I haven't read all 150 posts so maybe this film was already listed.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  80
Total posts:  738
Initial post:  Jun 13, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 29, 2013

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