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Top Ten Movies To See Before You Die


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Showing 1751-1775 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jul 19, 2012 5:54:06 PM PDT
stevign: ""I was being respectful of Lev whilst addressing him"

Yeah, thanks g-dd****t.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 19, 2012 5:55:02 PM PDT
live from Mars:

Robards isn't in it much, but he steals the film, and his aura hangs over it even when he's offscreen.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 19, 2012 6:08:47 PM PDT
Top Cat says:
I always thought Robards was best in minor roles. The one exception I'd make is 'Long Day's Journey...'
Always better than George Peppard!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 19, 2012 7:14:16 PM PDT
re: Shutter Island

I really liked the whole desolate, cavernous mental asylum on a craggy island setting. The story was fine but the sinister ambience was what kept my attention.

The ending was not something I predicted but made total sense to me.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 2:20:38 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jul 20, 2012 2:22:07 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 2:26:37 AM PDT
Balok says:
@Lev:

>> "A nasty remark in response to a honest one. That's pretty
>> contemptible."

> My goodness, man! Take our names out of it and simply read it as B's
> response to A. I make no claim to be the next Jonathan Swift, but do
> you not see any glimmer of wit in the response at all? Sheesh!

Actually, his comment was "honest" only in the sense that he may honestly believe that there is something that he doesn't know. Given that he only has one response to any actual demonstration that there is something that he doesn't know, one is forced to the conclusion that he believes that while there are many things that he does not know, you do not know any of those things (for any value of "you").

> If you're really serious, why are you issuing a threat that I have only
> ever heard come from Daffy Duck

Actually, it was Bugs Bunny who tended to say, "This means war."

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 2:27:48 AM PDT
Balok says:
@Baron Sardonicus:

"It might be a good idea to not even respond to those people who seem rude or condescending or pompous-- instead of sparring with them (which is the attention I suspect they enjoy)."

I would voice my agreement with the sentiment, but that would be responding to someone who is "rude or condescending or pompous."

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 7:53:20 AM PDT
Lev: You don't have the chops for Jungian analysis. It's out of your league. "You are expressing you low opinion of your own projections" makes neither logical--nor grammatical--sense.

Actually, I understand exactly what you are saying--in particular the rhetorical device of excusing rude behavior by saying "It's only a joke".

And I think iI will leave it at that, at least until you come up with the next howler.

Posted on Jul 20, 2012 8:04:02 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 20, 2012 8:05:35 AM PDT
And so to--perhaps not ten films you must see before you die, but a few films that one could call genuinely surrealist:

Un Chien Andalou and L'Age D'Or (love those bishops!)
Institute Benjamenta
Street of Crocodiles
Three Crowns Of The Sailor
Last Year At Marianbad (borderline, I admit, but the dreamlike quality perhaps justifies it)
The Saragossa Manuscript (see above)
Careful
Twilight Of The Ice Nymphs
That Obscure Object Of Desire
The Phantom Of Liberty
The Discreet Charm Of the Bourgeoisie (actually, one could populate the entire list Bunuel and Maddin)
Emak-Bakia (or any other Man Ray film of your choice)
Destino

And yes, I am deliberately ignoring the purely decorative pseudo-surrealist gestures in Fellini's work.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 10:14:32 AM PDT
Lev says:
Balok says: . . . while there are many things that he does not know, you do not know any of those things.

Lev: You leave me thunderstruck--I must know nothing at all!

Balok: Actually, it was Bugs Bunny who tended to say, "This means war."

Lev: I bow to your knowledge of the classics.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 11:34:18 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
TAS:an underrated actor> the quintessential neurotic post-war American male.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 11:35:04 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
JB: Cable Hogue?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 12:13:09 PM PDT
Fascinus says:
TAS: You would like Dahlia - a Raymond Chandler original script.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 1:52:14 PM PDT
LEV: Just read the posts! Do not get into the sand-box and play with these guys!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2012 9:38:12 PM PDT
Top Cat says:
Fascinus says:
>JB: Cable Hogue?"<

Aye, yes, hiding in plain sight as they say too much. That's true. Very good starring character role. Robards was good in other leading parts as well, but I still prefer him in small parts.

>Re: "TAS: You would like Dahlia - a Raymond Chandler original script."<

No he wouldn't. He just threw out the DVD in disgust, favoring the purchase of 'Melancholia' or some such. Any other good George Marshall films by your record? From 1916 to 1969, Marshall ground out an incredible amount of film. I've seen about 8 of them. I like 'Blue Dahlia', 'The Sheepman', and 'Murder, He Says' the best.

Posted on Jul 21, 2012 3:25:19 AM PDT
Top Cat says:
___Top Ten Movies About Terrorism to See Before ...___

1. That Obscure Object of Desire (drct: Luis Buñuel; wrtr: Jean-Claude Carrière; 1977)
2. Illustrious Corpses (d: Francesco Rosi; book: Leonardo Sciascia; 1976)
3. The Little Drummer Girl (d: George Roy Hill; b: John le Carré; 1984)
4. Week End (d & w: Jean-Luc Godard; 1967)
5. Homicide (w & d: David Mamet; 1991)
6. Children of Men (d: Alfonso Cuarón; b: P.D. James; 2006)
7. Battle of Algiers (d & w: Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)
8. The Third Generation (w & d: Rainer Werner Fassbinder; 1979)
9. Munich (d: Steven Spielberg; w: Tony Kushner, others; 2005)
10. The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum (d's: Volker Schlöndorff & Margarethe von Trotta; b: Heinrich Böll; 1975)

[I didn't list 'La Guerre est Finie', for one, because that masterpiece is only tangentially about terrorism...which I guess you could argue the same thing about for the Buñuel; ah, what the hell....
...and this is not counting documentaries; westerns; gangster movies; or all-out War movies, hence no 'Army of Shadows' or 'The Birth of a Nation']
__ _ __ _ __

____Bottom Ten Worst Movies Featuring Terrorism____

Collateral Damage (Andrew Davis); The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan); Face/Off (John Woo); Fight Club (David Fincher); Iron Man (Jon Favreau); Live Free or Die Hard (Len Wiseman); The Sum of All Fears (Phil Alden Robinson); True Lies (James Cameron); V for Vendetta (James McTeigue); Vantage Point (Pete Travis)

[note: I haven't seen 'Swordfish' or 'Invasion U.S.A.', which I've heard are beyond bad.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 21, 2012 3:31:39 AM PDT
Swordfish was good mainly because of Hugh Jackman dressed in a towel............ (was anyone else in the film?)

Posted on Jul 21, 2012 9:01:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 21, 2012 9:01:42 AM PDT
Actually, let me put in a good word for Swordfish--over and above the obvious of Hugh Jackman and Hallie Berry in various states of undress. (As I recall, Ms. Berry got a significant boost in compensation for showing her breasts. The viewing public wuz robbed. Not worth it.) Swordfish does have at least one obvious howler--Jackson breaking a key encryption in a few seconds--and trust me, that cannot be done. However--the idea of Travolta as a non-governmental anti-terrorist was actually pretty interesting. On the whole, a moderately entertaining watch.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2012 5:17:45 AM PDT
Balok says:
@JB:

If "That Obscure Object of Desire" is about terrorism, then so is "Brazil."

"Weekend" isn't about terrorism: it's about "how boring does a movie have to be before it becomes Art?"

Almodovar's movies "Labyrinth of Passion" and "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown" don't feature terrorism, but they do feature terrorists.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2012 2:40:56 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 23, 2012 2:48:23 PM PDT
I always thought Robards was best in minor roles. The one exception I'd make is 'Long Day's Journey"

He carried some films, like Tender is the Night and A Thousand Clowns, but was never a lead like he was on the stage. But he sure stole a lot of films from the nominal stars.

Actually, I don't think Long Days Journey has a lead or a supporting role. All the characters have just about the same number of lines.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2012 2:45:20 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 23, 2012 2:47:17 PM PDT
FAS "TAS: You would like Dahlia - a Raymond Chandler original script'

I owned a dvd copy of it. Its not bad,but I am put off by pretty much anything with William Bendix in it, and Veronica Lake. I just meant that Ladd wasn't asked to do anything special in it. I actually find the most interesting thing about it is not so much the mystery as the downbeat portrayal of the treatment of returning war vets, something most movies were ignoring, or glossing over. But I didn't find it interesting enough to keep. I got a pretty decent price for it though. Was that George Marshall? Pretty uninspired.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2012 11:49:13 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
JB:Five more onthe plus side of good "terrorist" films (and as my uncle who was responsible for anti-IRA work for the British police said 'My terrorist is your freedom fighter and vice versa".) Marianne and Juliane (Time of Lead in German)(also von Trotta);Circle of Deceit (also Schlöndorff); Blow to the Heart (Gianni Amelio); Carlos (Olivier Assayas);The Baader-Meinhof Complex (Uli Edel).

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2012 11:51:26 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
TAS: That strikes me as a qualified positive which is what I would give it.

Posted on Jul 24, 2012 11:52:13 AM PDT
Good terrorist films (sounds like an oxymoron): how about State of Siege?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2012 11:56:24 AM PDT
Fascinus says:
JB: Jerry Lewis was not initially impressed by Marshall but Stan Laurel spoke to him praising Marshall's excellent comic instincts. Lewis eventually revised his opinion. In addition to the comic work , Houdini is mildly entertaining and How the West Was Won is great in Cinerama.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  139
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Initial post:  May 4, 2012
Latest post:  Jul 25, 2012

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