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Most Overrated Director


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Showing 176-200 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 9:27:59 AM PST
Hikari says:
That's right . .Reiner did direct a Few Good Men. Not his usual genre at all!

I tried to find "This is Spinal Tap" awesome since that's what I kept hearing about it. I failed. I think it's a one-gag bit that carried on way too long. The actors have it nailed down, but the 'plot' such as it is could have worked brilliantly as an SNL skit and that's about all.

On the other hand, I found "Waiting for Guffman" hysterical. Maybe, since I live in a town not unlike Blaine, the uncomfortable reality made me laugh from recognition.

Mr. Smith, I'd be tickled if you'd indulge me and get your hands on a copy of "The Big Tease"--not directed by nor starring either Christopher Guest or Rob Reiner. Mi amour is the star of the 'Guffman-esque' mockumentary set in the world of international hairdressing competition. Craig Ferguson plays 'Crawford Mackenzie', the Scottish hair diva equivilent of Corky St. Clair, except that Crawford is endearing and actually has talent in his chosen profession. It's pretty clever.

Posted on Jan 1, 2012 9:36:13 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
Man, I'm surprised. For some reason, I though Spinal Tap WAS a Guest movie! Where did I get that misconception?! I don't think I can get my head around the idea that Reiner did it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 11:46:53 AM PST
Tim R. Niles says:
Some films have to be given positives simply because they get made, and "Brazil" falls into that group. It's something like a ramped up "1984."

I liked "Spinal Tap" but it's not something that I would watch dozens of times, but it was Reiner's first film and because of the comedic talent on screen, you have to assume that a great deal of the dialog was done in the moment. The actors could not have done this film unless they had strong feelings about the music... and the inherent comedy of heavy metal lyrics, as well as the whole 'lifestyle.'

Reiner is another beast. "The Sure Thing" - always referred to as a remake of "It Happened One Night" - got it all. When Cusack was talking about that film he made an important statement, that Reiner was an actor's director, that he gave his actors the freedom to improvise, encouraged it. "The Princess Bride" was a great book and I doubt that anyone could have made a better film of it than Reiner.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 11:49:43 AM PST
Cav: Probably because Guest is in it (as Nigel) and because it looks like a first draft of Waiting for Guffman.

Posted on Jan 1, 2012 1:34:27 PM PST
Cavaradossi says:
William A. Smith

Thanks for giving me an out!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 3:56:36 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Cavardossi says:
"Man, I'm surprised. For some reason, I though Spinal Tap WAS a Guest movie! Where did I get that misconception?!"<

It WAS a Chris Guest movie in a considerable way: he and Harry Schearer were the main masterminds behind it, and it is very much the same mine of "mockumentary" improve humor that Guest would make such of in 'Waiting for Guffman', 'Best in Show', et al.

>>"I don't think I can get my head around the idea that Reiner did it."<<

He had his name on it. He helped decide where some of the cameras were positioned, and he acted in it as The Interviewer. That's all. Whatever is good, and great, about 'This is Spinal Tap!' is to be credited to the 'band members' not the interviewer!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 4:14:34 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Tim R. Niles says:>"Some films have to be given positives simply because they get made, and "Brazil" falls into that group."<

Interesting. So if I go out and make the world's first lesbian cannibal superhero movie, it's automatically to be given a free pass and considered a positive? Alright.

>"I liked "Spinal Tap" but it's not something that I would watch dozens of times, but it was Reiner's first film and because of the comedic talent on screen"<

Not counting a couple TV movies he made in the 1970s.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 5:10:50 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 1, 2012 5:23:16 PM PST
Obion1884 says:
Spielberg hands down. Can't stand his sentimentality, his cloying portrayal of children as miniature adults and under-lighting of his earlier movies. I have to use the qualifier early movies as I stopped watching him a long time ago. The only movie I have any appreciation for is the box office bust, 1941. Seems like he took a chance, flopped and resolved to never again do anything but pander to both critics and viewers who recoil at any film where you have to dig a little to understand. Ebert is a classic example of the critic who never tries to find out what the director is doing.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 5:15:23 PM PST
Tim R. Niles says:
Your lesbian superhero film would only be the first IF it had a budget over $20K.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 5:24:16 PM PST
Tim R. Niles says:
When Spielberg dropped by the UCLA class in 1978 (after his "3rd Kind" was released, he mentioned "1941" as his next project and stated that he was looking forward to working with Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi. He was asked what kind of film it was going to be and said: "A comedy... but if the comedy doesn't work then we'll sell it as Action."

I would disagree that he has taken no risks: "The Color Purple" would never have been considered "Spielberg material" nor would have "Schindler's List."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 5:34:33 PM PST
Tim R. Niles says:
Ahh yes, the critics. There is a line in the 1947 film "Lady in the Lake" where the editor of a string of pulp fiction mags says to the Raymond Chandler character Philip Marlowe: "If the people who read our magazines knew the facts of life, Mr. Marlowe, they wouldn't read our magazines."

Critics of films have to kiss enough director/industry butt to keep on the good side of the 'names' and yet speak to anyone who reads/watches in another more limited vocabulary... and sadly, those who often take the main TV critic positions are rarely knowledgeable of the details involved in filmmaking, only how it looks on the screen (which is how the casual viewer responds.) Siskel used to chide Ebert for being too chummy with the stars and directors.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 5:44:39 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 4, 2012 5:53:26 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 9:43:33 PM PST
Balok says:
@Jonathan P. Baker:

> So if I go out and make the world's first lesbian cannibal superhero movie, it's automatically to be
> given a free pass and considered a positive?

That depends on whether the lesbians are the cannibals, the superheros, or both.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2012 10:27:42 PM PST
Jonathan says:
Re: "That depends on whether the lesbians are the cannibals, the superheros, or both. "<

When I typed that, I thought it was sufficiently implied that the lesbians were cannibal-superheros. Either way, can we name another movie with all three elements? Surely they have been made, but have they been seen by an audience of more than a dozen?

Posted on Jan 1, 2012 10:40:15 PM PST
Miami Nights says:
Oren Peli, the director of the Paranormal Activity movies. The first movie wasn't scary at all, and I had no interest in seeing the other two. I think people went wanting to be scared, and thus they were. The movie was very telegraphed and the so-called scary moments consisted of making things calm and quiet and then delivering the cinematic equivalent of going "BOO!!!"

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 10:40:35 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2012 10:41:27 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
Here's a name out of the past, a director who's films automatically generated interest and box office, Otto Preminger. Yet, even his most famous films could be riddled with oddities, from simple camera mistakes, costuming and hairstyle mistakes in films set in definite periods, script improbabilities, etc. Still, the movies were the topics of conversations and ticket sales, soundtrack albums were released for almost all of his movies. Some remain interesting viewing even today and among my favorites are: The Man with the Golden Arm; Anatomy of a Murder; Exodus; The Cardinal; and In harm's Way. I think after Way he began to lose his touch and too many of his movies no longer seemed like Preminger films.

I neglected to mention that one of the principal reasons Preminger's movies generated such interest was because of his focus on then controversial topics: drug addiction in Man with the Golden Arm; a sexually charged murder trial with words that and descriptions that were probably receiving their first big feature exposure - Anatomy of a Murder; the founding of Israel after WW 2 in Exodus; abortion in The Cardinal; racial prejudice in Hurry Sundown. Actually, that list gives one of the reasons for Preminger's decline. He was the first to put these things on the screen in respectable movies, but the times overcame him and the things that he would have honed in on were no longer controversial. He was big, though, and several of his pictures are still worth viewing.

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 10:48:13 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
On Preminger

How could I have forgotten Advise and Consent, still mandatory viewing for people with a rose-colored glasses view of our government? Advise is Preminger's most acidic and, in many ways, most unpleasant film. I suspect it will be the one most likely to live on after the others are forgotten.

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 10:55:35 AM PST
Cav: I quite like many of Preminger's films: Advice and Consent is the necessary antidote to Mr. Smith Goes To Washington--a personal favorite. Bunny Lake is underrated, I think. I'm not fond of Anatomy Of A Murder--too long and that score is like fingernails on the blackboard. His Saint Joan is quite good, and let's not forget Laura.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 5:39:41 PM PST
David says:
Surely Orson Welles should be on the list. He was a Hollywood wunderkind who made only a single movie of importance, not appreciated in its time, and now vastly overrated.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 5:53:41 PM PST
Welles, if anything, is underrated. Citizen Kane, by any reasonable standards, is one of the greatest films ever made, and one of the few that consistently can be consider THE greatest film ever made. Given the trouble that Welles had with studios from The Magnificent Ambersons onwards, it's a wonder that he ever managed to finish a film, let alone manage the number of fine films that followed--Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Touch of Evil--let alone those wonderfully quirky independent films like F for Fake and Mr. Arkadin. Then there are the Shakespeare films, and The Trial....

Overrated? I don't think so.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 6:00:16 PM PST
W. Grieve says:
The opening shot in Touch of Evil is visual poetry.

15 films from 34-78..not bad.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 6:06:20 PM PST
Unquestionably Howard Hawks. The man never made an intelligent film, just one after another filled with cliche after cliche. Brainless. And he totally ruined two good books: The Big Sleep and To Have and Have Not. He was so uninspired he made the same film three times under different, but similar, titles.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 6:13:40 PM PST
Just when I thought I couldn't see anything more idiotic from TAS.

Happy New Year, everyone.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 6:17:30 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 3, 2012 6:17:50 PM PST
WG: 116 as actor, 42 as director, according to IMDB. And at his best--one of the very few who fundamentally changed the way we make and see films.

Yeah--underrated.

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 6:40:10 PM PST
W. Grieve says:
I think you will find your figures include complete and incomplete films and roles.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  93
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Initial post:  Dec 20, 2011
Latest post:  Apr 20, 2012

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