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Customer Discussions > Music forum

Will CDs Become Valuable Collector's Items many years in the future?


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Showing 1-25 of 102 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 2, 2012 6:55:02 PM PST
Rob1965 says:
Will CDs like vinyl become big collectors items years down the road in the future if they become completely antiquated? The asking prices for early LPs by Elvis and The Beatles and others on Ebay are in the hundreds. Will the same happen to CDs? It seems like their going to be the last physical format for music unless something better comes along.

Posted on Feb 2, 2012 6:59:29 PM PST
A customer says:
They already have, some of them. I've gone over $100 for a CD more than a few times.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 7:21:22 PM PST
DKPete says:
Only CD's of specific pressings will go for that much such as the 24 karat gold and the MFSL versions..many of these already go for quite a buck as they are no longer in print. The same applies for the vinyl...the "regular" pressings of Beates albums, for example, don't go for all that much (unless they happen to be in all-round mint condition)...it's the "special" pressings which demand the most money, maybe some with special, rare label variations and, depending which country you live in, the rarity factor of certain foreign pressings-especially if they are originals as opposed to latter day pressings.

Posted on Feb 2, 2012 7:26:40 PM PST
Miami Nights says:
Perhaps only for albums that are out of print in the future, and unavailable anywhere else.

For a good look into the future, just think of which LPs are highly sought. Which ones will people shell out a lot of money for?

Even though LPs aren't sitting there filling rows and rows in the remaining music stores out there, new LPs are still pressed from time to time.

Posted on Feb 2, 2012 7:34:07 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 2, 2012 7:34:36 PM PST
Jeffrey M. says:
Heh, I hope so. I'm sitting on a goldmine if that happens.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 8:03:49 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 2, 2012 9:11:05 PM PST
Yes. If it's a limited pressing and/or out of print, CDs can go for big bucks. You can't find this one for a reasonable price these days, for example:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMSAT-ANGELS-FICTION-CD-Out-Print-RPM157-SOUND-CHAMELEONS-/170775505218?pt=Music_CDs&hash=item27c3036942

I have one but I ain't selling it, so don't ask. LOL.

Posted on Feb 2, 2012 8:37:18 PM PST
A customer says:
Not bad, Venus.
The Holy Grail of my collection is Demigod - Slumber of Sullen Eyes on Drowned Prod. If anyone really wants it, I *might* give it up in exchange for a kidney.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 9:10:15 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 2, 2012 9:13:43 PM PST
Thanks. This is sad, and I mean nothing derogatory here because I know you're joking, but I had an ex-boyfriend who became seriously ill and had to sell off his valuable collection of rare vinyl and CDs. It's fun, I collect them myself, but it can be a lucrative investment as well. Pity he had to part with things that meant something to him, but living on SSD he had no other choice, unfortunately.

How much is the Demigod worth, incidentally?

Posted on Feb 2, 2012 9:18:37 PM PST
Mr. DjTenn says:
they already are..and have been for years. You can really thank Ebay for driving up prices so quickly (ie, the last 10 years), but the market does determine which ones are worth what's being asked. The down side is that since digital albums are the new CD, record companies are licensing out reissues left and right to small companies. Thus, even valuable items are being re-introduced to the market; thereby, driving down the value.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 11:07:16 PM PST
A customer says:
That is awful. Music is my raison d'etat, and I know I'm not the only one who feels that way, so such a tale is truly heartbreaking. Would I sell my entire collection to help save my life? Well, I pray that I never have to answer that question. It really makes you appreciate what you have.

I have to guess because I can't find a copy of that pressing listed on any site that I know of, but I would say around 350 USD for a mint copy. It's not the Yesterday and Today "Butcher" album or anything, but for an underground death metal CD, it's 3 feet high and rising.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 2, 2012 11:11:39 PM PST
Rob1965 says:
I think that the value of the CD version of an album will go up if it's out of print even if they re-issue it as a digital album because digital abums are not tangible and the original pressing from the original label will increase the value.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 3, 2012 12:19:27 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 3, 2012 12:20:17 AM PST
I tend to agree with you. The CD I posted above, for instance, is the original label's issue. It was re-issued (again in a limited pressing) on another label since but the sound quality is reportedly not quite as good, so the original RPM label release is still highly sought after. Sound quality w/MP3s is iffy sometimes, so CDs will probably retain their values at least until an improvement is made, maybe longer. Such is the case with vinyl, particularly with albums that have never been released in any other format.

Posted on Feb 3, 2012 9:42:50 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 15, 2012 9:46:38 AM PST
vivazappa says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Feb 5, 2012 8:07:13 PM PST
Rob1965 says:
If Justin Bieber becomes as big as Elvis Presley maybe the CD versions will go up in value in 20 or 30 years since many of his teenage fans are buying the digital download versions of his albums. How rare a CD or LP is among collectors is also what makes them valuable.

Posted on Feb 5, 2012 10:29:37 PM PST
Certain CD's have become collectible Look on ebay. I have some that have gone up quite a bit as they are out of print.

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 9:30:25 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 15, 2012 9:46:54 AM PST
vivazappa says:
0 for 9 on my above post???

OK kiddies open up your CD's and see what they fetch...
If you have a real collecters item keep it sealed and go buy a regular copy to listen to...
Otherwise you get a low return should you want to get top $$$
I open everything and play it so my CD's won't be very expensive...

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 9:35:06 AM PST
Savage Lucy says:
Opening something doesn't make it totally worthless. Yes it does decrease the value, but many collectors want to enjoy their collections anyway. I collect toys, and yeah there are some things where the price difference is ridiculous for in or out of the box. But a lot of things now come with "collector friendly" packaging which allows us to put everything back the way it was. I'm always honest when selling, and I've rarely made a lesser sale due to unboxing. (Provided the item and box are in good condition.) I'm sure the same logic applies to almost any sort of item people collect.

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 9:37:11 AM PST
vivazappa says:
You're right...

Also denting the corners of boxes can be fatal...same with the corners on baseball cards!

Posted on Feb 9, 2012 3:16:57 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 9, 2012 3:17:13 PM PST
The Cloud 9 promo CD had a picture of George facing away on the disk itself - it was going for over 100 when I was looking at it, but then it came down some because it wasn't moving. I ended up getting it, but I don't remember what I paid. Less than 100 though.

Posted on Feb 9, 2012 3:34:32 PM PST
B. Stockwell says:
One thing that downloaded MP3s lack is resale value. You can't resell, for instance, a downloaded Sinatra collection. But posh, multi-disc deluxe items in cases with booklets - and sometimes actual books, as with "Sinatra: A Voice in Time" - are potentially VERY desirable items. I mean, if they are desirable NOW, I'd expect them to be even more so as the years pass. Complete Reprise Studio Record - Deluxe Edition The Sinatra box set Complete Reprise Studio Record - Deluxe Edition- 20 CDs - is $2,500 new. As a download, who cares? The thing is, packaging makes an item worth something, too. Try to sell an MP3 collection and see if you get any takers.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 9, 2012 5:13:20 PM PST
onsenkuma says:
Toward the end of the '80s I dumped quite a bit of my prime import vinyl collection for little more than peanuts (I needed the money at the time), and many of those titles are VERY rare now worth a small bundle on eBay. I don't think it's too big a stretch to imagine that the same may happen with many if not most CDs at some point. As others have suggested many titles have already gone OOP simply because the current economics of the music business mitigate against keeping so much music in circulation in 'hard copy' format.

Most people under 35 are slack-jaw fixated on their smart phones in the same way they might have been hooked on CD stores 10 or 15 years ago, so the current demand for CDs has taken a beating. Lower demand leads to lower production and lower production leads to lower supply. The flimsiest of pop cultural pretexts can easily lead to increased demand - again, consider the current demand for vintage vinyl - and increased demand in the face of low supply equals a seller's market.

Obviously, the big interest will be in 'first' and 'limited' editions for some time, but as even relatively obtainable titles go OOP and get harder to find, they too will command higher prices. I've already taken the step of boxing up a lot of CDs I had intended to sell to a local used shop - a lot of which fit the first/limited edition bill because that's usually all I've bought in the last 20 years - with an eye to checking out how they move on eBay in a few years. Anyone think I'm off base on this? Well, we'll see...

Posted on Feb 9, 2012 11:51:30 PM PST
J. Hand says:
It depends on how people will feel about ownership of music. Right now many who download are quite happy to lease their music. They don't mind the lack of covers and cases, artwork and goodies that used to be packed in with records and a lot of CD box sets. Even then, the consumer can only buy what the companies offer for sale. No product means you can't buy it. Look at what they save from production costs in making the physical CD, to packaging from the case to artwork to the wrapper and stickers, the warehousing and transportation costs... So, if it gets to the point that "all" music is in the 'cloud' somewhere and a person can access it all and maybe even get video content from album art and liner notes maybe the whole concept of music ownership will change and nobody will care if they can hold it in their hands if they can push some buttons and hear what they want. maybe that's my thing with wanting to buy and own my music; it's how I have done it my entire life.

I'm sure some people will continue to collect CDs, however I expect way down the road that those numbers will continue to shrink. it may become collecting in the way some people collect license plates, marbles, or bottle caps. Listening to them may not be a part of collecting them. Stereo gear has already seen a market shrinkage with the rise of the personal music player. Cost-wise there is no comparison. I have the equivalent of the price of a good mid-sized car invested in my system and under $300 in my mp3/video player and good ear buds. There used to be a dozen stereo specialty stores withing 50 miles of me. Not a one remains. When I upgraded my system some years ago I had to buy everything over the Internet. When I need one of my Carver amps services I have to send it to Washington state or Oregon because there are no repair shops around that do that kind of thing these days. (I have a very nice Nakamichi receiver and a JVC AX7-A integrated amp that need serviced and I can find neither parts to repair it myself nor ANY place anywhere that has the stuff to do it.) As the audio gear market has gotten smaller, I think affordable quality audio is largely gone. What's out there seems to be either low end component systems or over priced mid-fi stuff. The good gear is expensive even for low powered minimalist systems. These days especially, who has the kind of $$$ to drop on a system, especially on the most vital part: great speakers.

In a high-end audio catalog I just got today over half of it was all equipment designed for audio files played from flash drives, USB connections, Internet based streaming audio, and the like. There was as much equipment to interface to a computer including some very nice (and pricey) DACs. With the nature of the equipment to play music over evolving away from traditional formats, CD and LP, can the gear to play them on become as specialized and niche marketed as cassette decks? Sure, any total demise of the CD is still a loooooong ways off and there is still some superb gear being made (some of the new Vincent and Parasound solid state/tube hybrid stuff make my ears itch to hear them). People said records were obsolete but ever since the arrival of the CD in the early 80s, LPs never really went away. They seem easier to find now and turntables and the associated hardware to integrate them into audio systems are plentiful.
I imagine CDs will have a long presence past any declaration they are dead and gone.

I never sold my albums and I don't think I'd sell my CDs either. I hope I can make some future collector very happy when times comes to part with a lifetime of a loving endeavor.

Posted on Feb 10, 2012 7:42:41 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 10, 2012 7:42:59 AM PST
vivazappa says:
What does everybody think of the current state of CD's???
Everytime I go into a place that even has them (Best Buy...Barnes and Noble) they have less and less...
Record stores no longer exist...(well there are a couple which usually have used product)...RIP Tower Records!

It's down to website purchases...Amazon and CD Universe are my best sources...
And band sites...especially good for buying "live" shows...

CD's are doomed...
"We've got five years my brain hurts a lot,
Five Years and that's all we got"--Bowie

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 10, 2012 10:33:14 AM PST
J. Hand says:
Look at eBay listings for new CDs- there are over a million. Look at used discs- just as many. Put CD retailers into Google- over 15 million hits. Don't forget the whole world is out marketplace, too. I already get about everything but groceries online. The stores like Best Buy and the remaining music store we have here are the most expensive places to buy CDs anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 10, 2012 11:32:06 AM PST
Dee Zee says:
Most bigger places have a few used CD record stores. I'm in the Washington DC area and we have several that stock new and used vinyl as well as used and new CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray.

Look for the local Record Reseller Store.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  29
Total posts:  102
Initial post:  Feb 2, 2012
Latest post:  Mar 30, 2012

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