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The Beatles : American Music and The British Invasion

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In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 3:59:26 PM PST
Joyce says:
Dear Lawrence:
yes, there are many 'used to be' teenage idols....
thanks for the EJ song link! it is good! nice lyrics, and true enough! :)
love,
joyce :)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:02:57 PM PST
H&L says:
So I went to the teenage God of Rock:)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:31:06 PM PST
Severin says:
You're right, a lot of people don't read the fine print when they sell their soul.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:35:03 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 4:40:27 PM PST
My point was a counter to your point as it pertained to marketing... I had never seen or heard of the Beatles before so they were never marketed to me.

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 4:38:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 4:43:24 PM PST
Hinch says:
Fats Domino is an American artist I didn't mention. The piano playing in 'Lady Madonna' was inspired by Fats, who covered the song in 1968. Today I got a 2004 cd from the library titled FATS IS BACK. He did a new recording of L.M. as well as 'Lovely Rita' and 'Everybody's Got Something To Hide....'.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 5:23:23 PM PST
Re: MiBoDoCa says:

"The Beatles were one of the FIRST to compose their own original material." That is not counting Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran, Little Richard, Fats Domino etc.

I DID say "one of" and besides, I was referring specifically to the British Invasion Groups we were discussing, not 50s Rockers.

This was in response to the suggestion that any other British Group might have achieved the same "Initial Burst" with similar marketing & promotion.

"BIG part of their appeal was their unique SOUND" An update of The Crickets sound

Not to take anything away from the Crickets, who I really like, but they weren't employing the "fresh' "new" sounds I specifically mentioned, i.e. McCartney's creative Bass melodies or Ringo's "Merseybeat" Drumming that revitalized the Music scene during a period of musical stagnation.

Besides, Buddy Holly and the Crickets had ALREADY appeared on Ed Sullivan and failed to ignite "Cricketmania".

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:43:53 PM PST
Dear Don

I like your concise take on the Beatles' staying power. I'm not alone in my feelings, but I fell in love with them when I first heard 'I Want to Hold Your Hand' and never was swayed from those feelings. Sure, alot of groups would come along, I'd love their music, buy their albums, go to their concerts, but in the end I my heart was always with the Beatles. I don't know that I can define it without going on forever, but there they were for those magical years. And now? They are still with us. New books, gallery exhibits, re-releases of films, re-mastering again of their work. I know we only have Ringo and Paul with us physically, but George and John still exert their powerful work on all levels. Several years ago Ringo presented Vince Gill with a Grammy. Kanye West had been a jerk with some of the other artists winning, but Vince had the presence to look at West and say "Have you ever been presented with the Grammy from a Beatle?" That only reinforced the feelings I've had all these years.
Thanks
Bonnie

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:45:38 PM PST
Stephen, I like a version of 'Love Till the Sun Shines' from the BBC.
It's rougher in sound, but good, played faster, more energetic.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:49:10 PM PST
Dear Joyce
I've got those Donovan albums.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:57:58 PM PST
Dear Joyce
Just happened to be going through songs stored on my computer at 2:00AM - couldn't sleep - and those songs, just happened to be the first I listened to. I've always like 'Young and Innocent...' for the acoustic guitar and Ray didn't do a bad job with the harpsichord. Nicky Hopkins wasn't playing with the group any more at that stage.

After that I listened to 'San Francisco Girls' by Fever Tree, love that song.
Listened to some songs by The Incredible String Band. Anyone heard of them?
I like some of their stuff a lot, but they're not for all tastes.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:59:11 PM PST
Dear Joyce
Me a hero?
Aww, gee...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:08:06 PM PST
Severin says:
Bernard, I do have 1 album by them, "Wee Tam & The Big Huge" but I don't play it much. Actually it's been so long that I only have an impression of it as too precious. I'll have to give it another try. My tastes change even without me knowing it so it's possible for me to discover something great in my own collection.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:13:54 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 7:15:25 PM PST
Donald
That's the album I was listening to.
They were great musicians and songwriters, but not great singers. They had strangely off key, out of tune vocals from time to time. "Wee Tam...." is a product of its era and some of it's twee, but I don't mind.
Paul McCartney was a big fan of their 'Hangman's Beautiful Daughter' album.
The albums they released after "Wee Tam.." weren't as good, they seemed to show signs of running out of ideas. As I said before, they're not for all tastes.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:16:07 PM PST
ronct says:
I disagree. No other group had the depth of lead singers or songwriters as the Beatles. No one could really match the level of diversity found in their musical talent.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:19:13 PM PST
Eddie...thanks.. "Young and Innocent Days" is one of best tracks from the 'Arthur' album.
Perhaps my very favorite.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:37:52 PM PST
ronct says:
Cyberian Husky,

Nice list and great to see someone recognized the Mamas & Papas.

I would include the 4 Seasons before the Monkees. I saw a PBS show the other night "The Making of the Monkees" and it confirmed all my beliefs of this group. They didn't even really like each other that much and Mike seemed very difficult and reminded me somewhat of Mike Love in behavior. They seemed to have pissed off a lot of people along the way and it made for an interesting show. I think the show was created a few years ago. I believe the early 2000's but don't quote me. :-)

I'm having a hard time thinking of 10 American artists I really , really respected for a long period of time. There are many I liked that were fun but through the years I don't feel they made music that made a difference. Like the Grass Roots for example I just feel for me they were only a fun listen and never went any deeper or took any chances musically. I like them but I don't feel they created music that had any significance. Now a group like the Mamas & Papas for me did create music the was something above the norm and made an impact on other artists.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:37:53 PM PST
Severin says:
Thanks, Bonnie. I hope you're still having nice weather on the west coast, we've got a nor'easter going on tonight. Just a dusting of snow along the coast.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:40:16 PM PST
@Hinch
Did you see Fats Domino on HBO's Treme last week? He did a little Blueberry Hill! Fantastic music on that show!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:43:34 PM PST
ronct says:
Eddie,

I agree Bowie is up there with other great creators of music!

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 7:53:42 PM PST
ronct says:
I don't agree with the inclusion of the Bee Gees since they didn't invade here until 1967 after "Sgt. Pepper" hardly during the "British Invasion". I still don't think the Who made much of a splash here until the latter part of the 60's, but I do agree they were releasing music trying to break through to the American audience.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 7:58:48 PM PST
Bernard,
I love 'San Francisco Girls', great song. I saw Incredible String Band once, didn't care for them.
John

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:06:26 PM PST
ronct says:
Not true at all. "I Want to Hold Your Hand" was a sound we never heard before and was #1 long before the Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan (when we got our first official look at them). Famous musicians quote all the time hearing their music and being totally blown away at what they were hearing. Was there marketing sure but isn't every artists marketed? In 1963 Lennon and McCartney were earning songwriting awards in England before they even arrived here. Their songwriting skills was the 1 point that immediately put them ahead of all out artists coming out at the time. There was something special that was recognized immediately. Their hair was a novelty the music was real.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:13:45 PM PST
ronct says:
John,

Right on! Very well said and Mitch is actually a few years younger to really understand what music was like at the time.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:14:56 PM PST
ronct says:
Donald,

Very nicely put!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:24:10 PM PST
Joyce says:
Dear Lawrence:
yeah! i guess you did!
love,
joyce :)
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  49
Total posts:  10000
Initial post:  Nov 6, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 24, 2013

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