Customer Discussions > Music forum

"Purple Haze" or "Purple Rain"?


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 90 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 5, 2013 11:24:35 AM PST
J. Coco says:
"Purple Haze" or "Purple Rain"?

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 11:34:32 AM PST
No contest at all for me-Purple Haze.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 11:51:11 AM PST
No contest--Purple Haze, it is!

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 12:59:40 PM PST
B L T says:
Purple Haze

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 1:09:42 PM PST
- says:
Purple Haze

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 2:12:38 PM PST
Purple Haze and its not even close. Purple Rain is a boring song.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 2:50:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 5, 2013 2:51:20 PM PST
Johnny Bee says:
Jimi, although Purple Rain is a fine song.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 2:53:58 PM PST
ulijon says:
Purple Haze by a million miles , althougth Phish do a fine version of Purple Rain

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 5, 2013 8:46:01 PM PST
Working Man says:
Purple Haze without a doubt for me. I was never much of a fan of Prince.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 9:00:38 PM PST
This is turning into a slaughter!

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 9:28:55 PM PST
J. Coco says:
I didn't vote in my original post, but I have to go with "Purple Rain" - the title track of my all-time favorite album by my all-time favorite artist.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 6, 2013 3:19:20 AM PST
club 7 says:
purple rain is a great song but it's not as explosive or as otherworldly as purple haze. hendrix came out of nowhere and made music that was like nothing before or since though their have been imitators.
kind of in the same ballpark as the Velvet Underground. truly groundbreaking and mindblowwing. prince though is a genius in the league of hendrix. but yes i choose purple haze.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 6, 2013 10:17:12 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Apr 18, 2014 9:08:04 PM PDT]

Posted on Mar 6, 2013 11:07:56 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 6, 2013 11:08:39 PM PST
@Jevrick: "Whereas most people interpreted Purple Haze to just be about purple microdot or whatever other drug Jimi was talking about, Purple Rain's call for unity, love, and healing holds up better over the long run, so I'd pick Purple Rain."

Believe it or not, but "Purple Haze" was not about drugs, and Hendrix hadn't even tried LSD yet when he wrote the song. The original lyric sheet was about ten verses longer than the released version and the refrain was "Purple Haze, Jesus Saves". Hendrix was not overtly Christian or anything, but the song was in fact meant to be about a transformative spiritual experience. So I would say that it was as deep and profound as "Purple Rain", if not more so. Not to say that "Purple Rain" isn't a classic, because it certainly is. Let's not forget that Prince idolized Hendrix, however, and all of his guitar work--including his work on "Purple Rain"--is influenced directly or indirectly by Jimi.

Posted on Mar 7, 2013 5:31:10 AM PST
Blues Junkie says:
Purple Rain is to Purple Haze as Rosanne is to Halle Berry

Posted on Mar 7, 2013 6:27:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 7, 2013 6:28:37 AM PST
vivazappa says:
Or as Grace Potter is to the broad in Alabama Skakes...HAZE!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 9:00:01 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Apr 18, 2014 9:08:26 PM PDT]

Posted on Mar 7, 2013 9:51:23 AM PST
gusula says:
I'm with Jevrick on this one -- the true test of a powerful song is that it can mean any number of important things to different listeners. I'm sure Bruce Springsteen gets ticked off every time they play "Born In the USA" to get the crowd pumped up at a high school football game somewhere in America -- but if he never intended for "Born" to take on such an anthemic character for the casual listener, why did he write a song with such an anthemic, catchy chorus?

No question, then, that "Purple Haze" fits the definition of a great song. "Excuse me while I kiss this guy?" Hey, it even works as a GLBTQ anthem! Not to discount the power of "Purple Rain," of course. That song works best as the culminating statement in Prince's criminally underrated film of the same name; as part of the movie soundtrack on CD, it's not nearly so moving.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 11:01:36 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 7, 2013 11:15:08 AM PST
@Jevrick: "It doesn't matter what Hendrix says its about, it's about how most people interpreted it."

If you want to interpret it as a drug song, like most people did, that's fine. But people misinterpret songs all the time. If I misinterpret "Day Tripper" as a song about a prostitute (as some people did at the time), and then go on to say that's the reason I hate it compared to, say, "In My Life", does that now factually make "Day Tripper" a weaker song than "In My Life"? Ridiculous!

"Also, oftentimes artists purposely write songs that are ambiguous and they know most of the public will interpret it a certain way, then they give this whole spiel like no, no, no, it's not about THAT, when in actuality in most cases it IS about "that.""

Did you read my post at all? Not only had Hendrix not tried LSD when he wrote PH, but the *original lyric sheet* for the song proves it was about something other than drugs. That's why I mentioned those things, to counteract any assertion (which you decided to make anyways) that he meant it to be about drugs and then backtracked on it when asked. The *original rough draft* of the lyric was about *Jesus*, for chrissake!

""Purple Haze" was a three minute song and most people got the drug reference out of it and any spiritual aspect was overlooked."

LSD and spirituality were strongly linked in the 60s, so anyone interpreting it as an "acid" song back then would have most definitely got the spirituality aspect of it. It's only today where people think that acid use equals some kind of meaningless brain fry. So even if I concede to your (IMO inaccurate) point that the song's meaning can only be taken from the way people interpret (or misinterpret) it, it's still at least as deep a song as "Purple Rain", to my mind. Read the lyric--whether it deals with drugs or not, it's clearly about something transformative and life-changing happening to the narrator.

"Far from being a Hendrix clone, he took all those influences and came up with his own original stuff."

I didn't say he was a Hendrix clone. That bit was just an incidental side point to my argument; I realize it's certainly not "proof" that PH is better than PR but then again nothing is "proof". It's ALL opinion, right?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 11:10:52 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 7, 2013 11:16:26 AM PST
@gusula: "Excuse me while I kiss this guy?" Hey, it even works as a GLBTQ anthem!"

Another misinterpreted lyric--the actual line is "scuse me, while I kiss the sky". However, Hendrix was aware of the misheard line and would sometimes jokingly point to Noel in concert and sing it as "kiss this guy".

"but if he never intended for "Born" to take on such an anthemic character for the casual listener, why did he write a song with such an anthemic, catchy chorus?"

What annoys Bruce isn't that people are taking it as an anthem, it's that they think the song is blindly patriotic when it is actually very critical of America. Anyone giving even a cursory listen to the lyric would realize this--but the fact that millions didn't only proves how brain-dead most Americans are when it comes to listening to music, and why in fact common popular interpretations of songs are NOT to be considered the standard by which a song is considered "meaningful" or not. IMO the example of "Born In The USA" only bolsters my case, not Jevrick's.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 1:16:21 PM PST
Mike EB says:
The same thing would happen at Grateful Dead shows when they played "All Along the Watchtower"...people would cheer for "There are many here among us that feel that life is but a joke"

but the next line "But you and I we've been through that and this is not our fate" would just sail right over their heads ...

Posted on Mar 7, 2013 1:39:43 PM PST
Laust Cawz says:
What about "Purple People Eater"??--

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DL1ZH0Ke92A

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 2:08:00 PM PST
gusula says:
FYI, I'm well aware that the actual lyric is "'scuse me while I kiss the sky" -- just pointing out that individual listeners tend to hear what they want to hear, not what the artist intended.

I heard Bruce play in Salt Lake City in the late 90s. He came to the front of the stage and played "Born In the USA" in a minor key, unaccompanied on an acoustic guitar. The song took on a whole other contemplative flavor. Because it was slowed down and in a minor key, it invited the listener to play close attention to what he was saying in the lyrics, and to "read" those lyrics as being highly critical of the America he grew up in. Bruce isn't stupid. He had to have known that, given the anthemic musical quality of "Born," not to mention its inclusion on an album that was up-tempo and wistfully reflective throughout ("Glory Days," anyone?), that listeners would likely read something into the song that wasn't explicitly there in the lyrics. Of all his albums, "Born" is arguably the most unabashedly commercial. Bruce was about moving product with "Born," and by that standard, he was monumentally successful. But there are costs to be paid for selling one's soul to the bottom line. All of a sudden there were legions of listeners sucking up "Born In the USA" and other hits from the album who had absolutely no context for listening to Bruce -- legions who knew him for dancing with a young Courtney Cox in a music video, and not for the dozens of hard-scrabble narratives he had produced for previous albums. So can we really accuse listeners of "misreading" the lyrics to "Born" when they pump their fists in the air and say, "Darned right, I'm an American and proud of it!" when the song plays? I have a different read of things. I would argue that the anthemic music actually transcends the lyrical content. Yes, there's a lot wrong with the country, but when we can all sing together "Born in the USA!" we've united to move past those problems.

Apologies for the rant -- it just drives me nuts when people argue that the producer of a message is the end-all expert on what that message "means." Green Day's "Wake Me Up When September Ends" is a prime example. Within the context of the entire "American Idiot" album, the song carries one message; as a music video with images of a young man fighting in Iraq, the song takes on an entirely different meaning. And in an interview, Billy Joe Armstrong revealed that he wrote the song about his father and his battle with some life-threatening ailment or another -- which gives the song a third meaning altogether. The song is obviously lyrically vague enough to communicate in three different ways, depending on the listener's orientation -- so which is the "actual" meaning of the song?

Sometimes artists themselves have no idea what they're trying to communicate when they compose a song. Back to Green Day. On the surface, at least, "American Idiot" is about a young man's struggles to grow up. But soon after the album came out, some critic decided to read into the album an indictment of the George W. Bush presidential administration. When asked if that was, indeed, the meaning of the album, Armstrong said, "Well, uh, yeah...." Billy Joe Armstrong isn't dumb either -- he figured an album condemning GWB in that particular political environment would move product, and he was right.

So what's the actual "meaning" of "American Idiot?"

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2013 3:31:28 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 7, 2013 3:32:11 PM PST
@gusula: "He had to have known that, given the anthemic musical quality of "Born," not to mention its inclusion on an album that was up-tempo and wistfully reflective throughout ("Glory Days," anyone?), that listeners would likely read something into the song that wasn't explicitly there in the lyrics."

Maybe so, maybe not. He may have thought the listeners who had been following him for years, would know he was more multi-faceted than that and would make an attempt to hear the lyrics. He also might have overestimated the ability of new listeners to do so. Or he might have known what would happen and went for the big commercial bucks anyways, but that still doesn't change the fact that the lyrics to the song are *not* about what many people thought they were. Artists can do what they want, and if they want to match uptempo, anthemic music to a social critique, they are free to do so, and it's *still* not their fault if the audience misinterprets the intent.

"Yes, there's a lot wrong with the country, but when we can all sing together "Born in the USA!" we've united to move past those problems."

That is how I would interpret it, as well. It's critical, *and* it's meant to bring people together. Too bad it's just so grating and obnoxious-sounding! IMO. ;)

"...it just drives me nuts when people argue that the producer of a message is the end-all expert on what that message "means.""

Now, hold on a sec--I wasn't going that far. I am all for somebody's individual interpretation of a work of art--be it in music, film, or literature--being legitimate, even if it's not precisely what the original artist intended. It's especially relevant to artists who deliberately leave their work open-ended to interpretation. However, while I'm open to there being legitimate separate interpretations of a work, there are some interpretations that are just *wrong*. But what I was really trying to say in my reply to Jevrick was that *his* interpretation of the lyric (ie the common one) wasn't the be-all, end-all, either. That there *was* a different meaning intended by the original author and while the "drug" interpretation can certainly fit the lyric, it would be wrong to dismiss the lyric based on that interpretation alone.

So in other words, the original author's meaning may not be the end-all be-all of a lyric, but neither are common/mass interpretations. So we should simply be wary in dismissing a lyric out of hand based on one interpreted meaning, when in fact as you note, there are multiple meanings that can usually be found in a song.

Posted on Mar 7, 2013 5:08:32 PM PST
If Prince got the idea for "Purple Rain" from "Ventura Highway", then that lowers my opinion of it. "Purple Haze" all the way.
JC
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Music forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  32
Total posts:  90
Initial post:  Mar 5, 2013
Latest post:  Mar 16, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.

Search Customer Discussions