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Customer Discussions > Music forum

Looking for the WORST country music


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Showing 176-200 of 250 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 5:27:16 PM PST
You are being very kind Hinch...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 5:30:24 PM PST
Seriously? This serves as more proof that you don't have a clue...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 6:56:54 PM PST
RE: ...ryhm...

Stop drooling when you type.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:05:43 PM PST
SouthernGent says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:07:40 PM PST
SouthernGent says:
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Posted on Nov 18, 2012 7:12:44 PM PST
>>>That is simply untrue.
Just because you say that with conviction, it don't mean shit to me!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:25:43 PM PST
Meade, this is your opinion of your own music. You can't be objective...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 10:15:11 PM PST
Kind of like musical masturbation then....

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 3:27:47 AM PST
Garth Brooks the Kiss of country.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 4:17:16 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> The song changes tempo purposely [sic]. Its [sic] something called "an arrangement".

Tempo and arrangement sound deliberate. And if it were deliberate, it still doesn't make it good, because Skelton was mangling the vocal phrasing just to keep up.

> Like in "Sweet Tea", it starts medium temp, then at the bridge it does slow down

Annnnnnd you can't even hear it when the rhythm is trashed, *right there in the intro* when Skelton/you obviously got nervous at the high piano fills and sped up. Then when the low chords come back in before the verse, he slows down again because he realizes how far ahead he is. What he doesn't realize is that the absolute worst place possible to slow back down is during the lull between chords. It causes a hiccup in the music, like a skipping record.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 9:13:11 AM PST
Golden Throats 3: Sweet Hearts Of Rodeo Drive { Various Artists }

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 10:06:34 AM PST
SouthernGent says:
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Posted on Nov 19, 2012 10:14:41 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> That is how he wanted to play it. That is his style.

First true statement from RVACountry Lover. Yes, crap is Meade Skelton's style. That's how he likes it.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 10:55:44 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 11:09:02 AM PST
First true statement from RVACountry Lover. Yes, crap is Meade Skelton's style. That's how he likes it. >>>

why the animus for bad reviews?
most people like what they like and let the reviews be damned.
bad reviews get people to check MS out for themselves (I know I did).
people just aren't interested in what he has to offer.

Meade's music speaks for itself louder than any review out there.

he is on the backside of his career. however pathetic his career was.
He has gotten more publicity for his despicable kroger blogs than he ever got with his music.

time for him to get a day job.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 11:22:45 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> why the animus for bad reviews?
> most people like what they like and let the reviews be damned.

Because reviewers are the only ones who would listen to Meade Skelton. So they *are* the sum total of his audience members.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 1:09:16 PM PST
SouthernGent says:
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Posted on Nov 19, 2012 1:23:07 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 1:34:34 PM PST
<<<I equate Meade as the Mitt Romney of Country music. >>
closer to Richard Mourdoc of country music, but that isn't even right.
Mourdoc had some success in politics before putting his foot in his mouth.

performing coffee shops for free, does not equate to being big enough in the country music to make any sort of statement like this.

Why isn't there more positive 'word of mouth' for MS? He has been doing this for a decade and one would think that his following would have more gusto.
It just seems the same one or two fanatics whose opinions are discredited by their fifth grade writing style talking like this guy is the greatest thing since Hank Williams(SR)..

then people check the youtube clips and find out the truth.

A big steamy pile of meade.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 2:20:41 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 2:20:58 PM PST
RE: That is how he wanted to play it. That is his style. The intro is fine! There is nothing wrong with his playing. The vocal phrasing is fine. There is nothing wrong with it. You are finding fault where there is none. He is original. His piano playing is different, but its not off. And his voice is good too.

If he's ever going to emerge from his musical crawl space, he needs to spend more time working on music rather than working on being the most ubiquitous, verbose Internet troll in the forum. So far he's a more established troll than a musician.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 2:21:50 PM PST
RE: People just want to have a smear campaign against Meade. I equate Meade as the Mitt Romney of Country music. He's a very ideal candidate, but everyone finds fault with him.

Major troll alert!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 3:46:06 PM PST
Twang doesn't mean nasally voice. It means a singer bends that last note (usually) up to the correct one at the end of a phase. The pedal steel guitar got famous in country because of it's distinctive way of bending notes to the correct one.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 4:51:16 PM PST
BubbaCoop says:
Wouldn't it be harder to find good Country music?

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 5:32:39 PM PST
Not a smear campaign, but open season on you Meade, you worthless human being.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 11:50:40 PM PST
Hinch says:
Music Luver

I agree. I always thought "twang" as having more to do with the sound of the musical instruments than voices. For example, Duane Eddy's twangy guitar. Some people on the forums seem to equate "twang" with a southern accent.

Here's a couple of tracks from the Duane Eddie album I own, HAVE 'TWANGY' GUITAR WILL TRAVEL, released in the late '50s, that used to belong to my grandmother.

"Rebel Rouser"

http://youtu.be/uGPG_Y-_BZI

"Lonesome Road"

http://youtu.be/fRZ2gaNgJTU

Posted on Nov 20, 2012 1:53:34 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> I always thought "twang" as having more to do with the sound of the musical instruments than voices.

Twang does have something to do with vocals. It has to do with a vocal quality country people often have, not restricted to the American South (eg. people from the Canadian prairies often have a "country twang" in their voice), and it has nothing to do with accents. Plenty of people speak with a Southern accent while having no twang in their voice. Willie Nelson, for example, has plenty of twang in his singing, but his accent is very careful, enunciated, jazz-influenced, not Southern. Years ago I also knew a woman from Saskatchewan who spoke with a *lot* of twang in her voice, yet had a thoroughly Canadian accent. It has to do with the resonance of the sound (timbre), not the accent.

In my opinion, Wikipedia's definition of "twang" is incorrect. Yes, the "twangy" sound in guitar is most associated with Fender and Gretsch guitars. However, it has nothing to do with "sharp vibrations" (which would be the result of using the vibrato bar, finger vibrato, or a vibrato pedal). It has to do with the depth of the sound, a result of using echo and reverb, and also because Fenders and Gretsches have that hi-fi, treble-heavy clean sound. Duane Eddy's record label was the one which had come up with this word in relation to music, but Eddy didn't use vibrato effects on most of his epic, rumbling, "Grand Canyon" guitar sounds, created by riffing on the low strings. Eddy used more tremolo than vibrato; people often don't know the difference between the two because of Fender Guitars' bastardization of the word "tremolo" in describing the bridge bar on its guitars, which achieves a vibrato effect, not tremolo. Listen to Eddy's "Rebel Rouser" -- it has no vibrato, very little pitch bending (just one phrase per repetition of the riff), but a *lot* of tremolo. And it's very, very twangy.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 2:24:35 AM PST
Hinch says:
Good post!

I didn't look at wikipedia, so I don't know what it's definition is, but I think you've got it right.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  41
Total posts:  250
Initial post:  Nov 9, 2012
Latest post:  May 14, 2013

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