Automotive Deals Summer Reading Shop Women's Clothing Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Pink Floyd Fire TV Stick Happy Belly Coffee Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis STEM Segway miniPro
Customer Discussions > Music forum

..finally watched Charlie Is My Darling...


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-16 of 16 posts in this discussion
Posted on Dec 29, 2012 9:12:30 AM PST
Exile says:
Just got my copy in the mail...Won't be able to view it until New Year's Eve day.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 7:13:15 PM PST
DK Pete says:
Actually, this film reminded me (moreso in look than content)
very much of The Beatles' First U.S. Visit DVD (which was actually renamed from the film's original title, What's Happening).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 7:10:16 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012 7:12:16 PM PST
Bernard J. says:
I get what you're saying about the black and white, and how color would have made a difference.
It just struck me as being old fashioned, behind the times, even for then.
It looked like a country that was still living in the 40's or 50's.

Either way, it's a fine DVD.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 6:52:31 PM PST
Dee Zee says:
I loved this blu-ray as well. And the redited version is better than either original cut of the film in the past. The restoration is good, audio good although I found the stereo mix had more low end punch that the 5.1 surround. The sheer excitement of the 2 performances captured is worth the price of admission.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 5:32:18 PM PST
ED S. says:
That's because it was shot in black and white and in cloudy conditions. You have no idea what colors were present. It looked old fashioned because 1965 was 47 YEARS AGO. And it was shot with hand held cameras with probably no lighing other than ambient. Houses aren't black or grey. They come in colors and shades of brick and morter colors. Guarantee you, the inside of the dineing car was any thing but black and white. "A hard Days Night" looks that way also. If a "Hard Days Night" were shot in color, you would see it in a different way. We also want to see The British Isles in the past as austere, grey, and old fashioned. After all, it was a fairy land to many a youth back in 1965.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012 11:12:29 AM PST
Dr. Mikey says:
Pete, true words about Brian. Three guys who had it figured out for themselves: Mick, Macca, Dylan.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 5:31:23 AM PST
DK Pete says:
Hinch, I agree. In all my years as a Stones fan between watching film clips, reading books and, of course, listening to his contributions on the records, not until this film did it hit me how-if he was of a different temperament of some sort-this guy could have gone on to great things with or without The Stones. He was truly one of those "street-punk" music guys that had it all: musical brilliance, intellectuality and a disarming charm which he was able to turn on and off like a light switch.

What he lacked, unfortunately, is what either nearly killed off or succeeded in killing off many of the potential shining lights of our time-an overall lack of self-discipline. It's in that area more than any other, in my opinion, that Jagger really beat him out on. This was the main thing I got out of Philip Norman's book on Jagger where the Jagger-Jones dynamic is very effectively brought out and analysed. Mick knew what he wanted, how to go about getting it and what it required of him, as a person, to get it.

While Mick used his self-awareness to achieve his goals, Brian allowed HIS self-awareness to smother him. All that said, this does not diminish, in any way, his brilliance as an artist or insightful articulator he proves himself to be in this film (again, much more naturally so than the highly controlled, self-conscious Jagger).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 4:59:50 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012 5:00:54 AM PST
Bernard J. says:
I've watched all the cuts of it and I enjoyed the DVD a lot.
I mentioned on another thread ( can't remember which one), about how old fashioned, austere, grey, the Ireland of 1965 seemed to look.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 12:47:39 AM PST
Hinch says:
I own all The Stones' videos except this one and the recent release with Muddy Waters. I'm not a big fan of rock documentaries and have been hesitating to get 'Charlie' but you may have me convinced. I'm a big fan of Brian. I think he was the genius of the group.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 7:07:00 PM PST
Exile says:
Its been on my wishlist for awhile and it's due to arrive New Years Eve day. Sweet!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 5:51:33 PM PST
DK Pete says:
Exile, you'll be smiling end to end as you watch a very vibrant, happy, eloquent Brian in this thing....makes it all the sadder knowing what was to come.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 5:49:41 PM PST
DK Pete says:
onsekuma..you're welcome...one real interesting thing I forgot to add. In watching this film, one gets no impression whatsoever that these guys were the so-called, "bad boys of rock and roll". They come off as quite a pretty straightforward, intelligent, sincere group of guys (with some very well expressed insights into their lives, their fans and the culture they sprang from). Their comments during the interview portions contain no hint of threatening arrogance as the press and their manager dutifully "painted" them to posess.

Have a good, healthy new year, Onsekuma.

Posted on Dec 27, 2012 5:47:04 PM PST
I got a copy for Christmas but I haven't had a chance to watch it yet.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 5:44:34 PM PST
Exile says:
Much to anyone's surprise, I haven't ordered this yet. Being the Stones fan that I am and the respect I have for DK's opinions over the years, I think its time to load up the Amazon cart....right NOW!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 5:38:16 PM PST
onsenkuma says:
DK,
Thanks for a great review and some insight into an item I've been interested in but knew little about. Maybe you should get some kinda small royalty here 'cause I think you just made the Stones a sale! Cheers...

Initial post: Dec 27, 2012 5:28:54 PM PST
DK Pete says:
Hi everyone. I got it for Christmas and just got to watch it.

For some odd reason, I hadn't placed too much hope in this film but, man, was I very pleasantly surprised!! Getting to watch more concentrated footage than ever of Brian Jones was, in and of itself, worth "the price of admission". It becomes amusingly obvious here what a "showman" Brian really had the talent to be when he wanted to.

The "showmanship" I'm referring to, though, is his brilliance at being an interviewee..he knew what to say, how to say it, how to LOOK while saying it-these are not putdowns by any means. I was loving every split second of it; the guy was truly a natural star in front of the camera-moreso, at times, than Mick, I might add. The thing is, Mick LOOKED like he put effort into seducing the camera. Brian, without trying, swallows it up and spits it right back at you...and you fall in love with him as he's doing it.

As far as Jones on stage...talk about a joy to watch. What a shame things ended as they did (both for HIM and The Stones, in my opinion).

As always, Bill Wyman comes across as the honest, level headed "George Harrison" of the group..at least that's how he came across to me...no put ons..just told it as he saw it and very directly and eloquently so.

While Charlie Watts isn't quite as eloquent, I also got to see the side of him represented which I've always read about: the down to earth, family guy who basically saw nothing special in his "line of work" (or his talent for that matter) and was happiest at home with his wife. And I'll tell you, of ANY Rock star who I've ever heard say even anything remotely like this, Charlie is the one and ONLY who means it.

...lots of fun footage of Keith and Mick either working on potential new songs or goofing on others (including a couple of VERY funny drunken Elvis and Beatle mocks).

The musical highlight (ALL of the live performances sound great and energetic as hell, by the way) for me, was the all time BEST live performance of Satisfaction I ever heard by the band. It's done straight off the recorded version, powerful, sincere, well straight-forwardly sung without any of the contrived add libbing to come in future years...

The overall quality of the film in it's restored form is, all taken into consideration, quite good; to appreciate just HOW good, the entire thing is also featured in it's original 'film" state as well as a frame by frame restoration demonstration feature.

If you're a music fan, in general, give some serious thought to getting this; it's an excellent documentation of the mid-sixties Stones at their "peak powers", as they say.

If you're an actual Stones fan to any significant degree and you've more or less followed them "all along", just go get it. This thing NEEDS a home in your collection.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Music forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  9
Total posts:  16
Initial post:  Dec 27, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 29, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.

Search Customer Discussions