Customer Discussions > Music forum

"Elvis and the Beatles stole from black music."


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 126-150 of 562 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2011 5:35:38 PM PDT
dallas says:
W.Robertson

Ray Charles and Willie Nelson did an album so yes Ray Charles did a Country album.And why did you feel the need to bring up race?

I don't care about an artist race it's all about the music.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2011 6:25:10 PM PDT
WR

Indeed he was.

Posted on Sep 8, 2011 7:00:30 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
Ray Charles did *two* country records. There was a Volume 2 of Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_Sounds_in_Country_and_Western_Music

And country music has black roots as well as white. Country music as "white music" is only a modern notion.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 9, 2011 9:29:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 9, 2011 9:35:42 AM PDT
W. Robinson says:
Well dallas, I WASN'T exactly the first to bring it up. Refer back to my own opening post please, .. what do I say there again ?

D. Mok, that may be true, .. but still, modern notions do prevail.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 6:18:29 AM PDT
There was a tradition of covering black music. That was part of the resistance to rock and roll by parents the source of that music; especially in a segregated society. That view had a certain context and it is easy to look back without understanding and judge that opinion.

Here is one example -
http://youtu.be/QFq5O2kabQo

http://youtu.be/Vv-LAbMbEn4

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 7:09:47 AM PDT
Most people who make this argument about the Beatles point to Twist and Shout.

Ironically the song was originally Shake it up Baby by the Top Notes and it was not soulful. One of the songs writers, Bert Russell, felt that Phil Spector ruined the song.
http://youtu.be/LsDpc-8iR8g

In 1962 the Isley Brothers decided to do the song and Russell produced the single and it was renamed Twist and Shout. The Isley Brothers-Russel remake changed the arrangement and those changes made this a soul/dance classic. This is the version the Beatles covered.
http://youtu.be/NhN-GhH5oxU

The Beatles and most British artists of the era loved, imitated and covered soul music. Here are the beatles performing twist and shout (their version of the single was released in 1963).
http://youtu.be/iS0wuN_6wyw

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 7:24:46 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2011 7:26:32 AM PDT
Marc says:
"But today, because whites are forced to copy black rap music to a certain degree in some cases to make it, who has class in music of any kind today, period? Isnt that sad? "
======================

What is really sad is that you think black music is only rap.

You seem to have missed jazz, smooth jazz, r&b, funk, rock and neo soul. There are many newer artists who are doing something other than rap.

Try listening to Prince, Lenny Kravitz, Kirk Whalum, John Legend, Brian McKnight, Lalah Hathaway, Joe Sample, Herbie Hancock, DeAndre, Musiq Soul Child, Angie Stone, India Irie, Maxwell, Eyrakah Badu, Alicia Keyes and Jill Scott.

Black music does not = rap, it has more breadth and depth than you seem to comprehend.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 7:39:56 AM PDT
Mistercd103 says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 7:57:24 AM PDT
Thank you for your thoughtful commentary and your wide ranging descriptive vocabulary with respect to the artists I mentioned. I also appreciate your assumption that I have never listed to Richie Havens.

I especially like Havens sample of the classic Negro spiritual "Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child" in one of his most famous songs "Freedom" made famous at woodstock in 1969. Listening to a spiritual set to bongos was interesting.

In my opinion Havens version is a pale imitation of Paul Robeson's deeply spiritual version of this deeply spiritual classic. It is a spiritual and best experienced that way.

http://youtu.be/Y3xT-Wyi0lo

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 9:16:28 AM PDT
Mistercd103 says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 10:36:19 AM PDT
Gino says:
Ok, first off, I have no link or specific source to quote here. The word's were John Lennon's, so I'm sure that they can be found among the reams of recorded speech he did.
Somebody (back around the break-up) asked John the question about his influences. Lennon made specific reference to "I'm crying", from Walrus, as lifted from Smokey Robinson.
He told the interviewer, "If you're going to steal, steal from the best." I don't think that Lennon or Robinson took that "steal" too literally.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 10:39:58 AM PDT
M. JACKSON says:
Indeed and I don't like the term stolen, more like exploited, which is still true about the music industry itself.

it's a byproduct of Human Behavior and Capitalism.

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 11:32:23 AM PDT
Does any of this really matter? Greek philosophers and ancient Indian philosophers defined music as tones ordered horizontally as melodies and vertically as harmonies - way before any 20th century 'black' or 'white' music .... and before the ancient philosophers? birds, and nature ..... By all accounts there is no single and intercultural universal concept defining what music might be.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 12:46:37 PM PDT
Mistercd103 says:
"Go listen to your garbage then"
=======================

Your comments suggest you are a bitter judgemental person. Good luck with that and prayers to those who know you.

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 12:47:51 PM PDT
Maclen says:
"I Am The Walrus" from Smokey Robiinson? What the heck are you smoking there Gino, come on man don't bogart that joint.......

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 1:29:31 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
>> "Go listen to your garbage then"
> Your comments suggest you are a bitter judgemental person. Good luck with that
> and prayers to those who know you.

Just take a quick look at his profile. He listens to Styx.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 1:50:00 PM PDT
Seven

For some reason you left out straight blues, electric and acoustic. Buddy Guy, Luther Allison, Magic Sam, Corey Harris, Otis Taylor, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Robert Johnson, Big Bill Broonzy, the 3 Kings, T Bone Walker, on down the line.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 4:20:36 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2011 4:21:22 PM PDT
Yes plus I also left out John Lee Hooker, Sam Cooke, Otis Redding, Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Etta James, Arthur Prysock, Al Hibbler, Joe Williams and many many others.

I don't know about you but I try to keep it brief. I know I would rather read a post instead of an encyclopedia.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 5:07:53 PM PDT
Seven

I wasn't as concerned about the names, but that you missed the blues.

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 5:34:24 PM PDT
George Carlin said it best. "White people can't sing the blues. White people give the blues."

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 5:44:05 PM PDT
MiBoDoCa says:
I think it's The Bonzo Dog Band who actually said it best. "Can blue men sing the whites or are they hypo-crites for singing?"

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 5:57:52 PM PDT
JO

Actually, Carlin is wrong about the first half. You would have to say 'they sing them differently'.

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 6:24:58 PM PDT
Beatles and Elvis cerainly listened to Black music they certainly were influenced by Black music in varying degrees but at the end of the day both artists were hugely unique and most people would do anything just to have 1% of their talent...so you might accuse an artist of having an influence but then you say okay this sound is unique and doesn't sound quite like anything else i've heard...50 and 55 years repectively for the Beatles and Elvis and we're still listening to them wouldn't be possible if they weren't unique...granted most of us weren't around when they broke in but still they started out a long long time ago...Elvis, John Lennon and George Harrison are long dead...so really this conversation is mute...who cares if they listened to black music? what does that matter for anyway? only thing that matters if the music is good...to accuse someone of ripping off another's sound is way out of line.

Posted on Sep 14, 2011 6:53:06 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2011 6:56:07 PM PDT
The great Willie Dixon quote answers this topic perfectly when he said; "The blues is the root, everything else is the fruit". Amen, brothers & sisters!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2011 7:05:17 PM PDT
Spyder B says:
The Irish stole their music from Bach, who stole it from English madrigals who stole it from the Druids who stole it from....
What a useless arguement.
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  162
Total posts:  562
Initial post:  Aug 17, 2011
Latest post:  Jan 4, 2015

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 13 customers

Search Customer Discussions