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Elvis Presley


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Posted on Aug 10, 2012 7:56:39 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
> If he was such an astute 'film maker' he would be busy perfecting his craft

Oh, so you're such an expert on filmmaking? Look up the word "rendering". If you had worked in film, instead of messing with your little Windows USB video rippers, you'd know what it means.

Posted on Aug 10, 2012 8:18:06 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 10, 2012 8:55:34 PM PDT
S. Stalcup says:
RE: Market Square Arena Final Show.
Those of you on this thread who are deeper into Elvis' recordings than I obviously am (still, that's two more Elvis CDs than I have compared to Michael Jackson and Madonna who both clock in with . . . bugger all in my collection. Not even a download of the Freddie Mercury demo of "State of Shock" to speak of), was that show at MSA ever legitimately or semi-legitimately released? If so, what's the title or titles if it's seen multiple releases? Also, does one have better fidelity than another? I'm not expecting '68 Comeback Special or Sun era as I know he was riding off into the Percodan tablet setting in the sky, but as a native Hoosier, it'd be nice to have, I think. Any info would be brilliant. Asking primary sources are better than going online and looking for dodgy downloads.

Cheers!

EDIT: I got an unhelpful for asking a question about Elvis on a thread dedicated to Elvis? WHY!!!!!????!!!!!!

Posted on Aug 10, 2012 8:35:39 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 10, 2012 8:39:15 PM PDT
Brian says:
D.Mok and Elvis Fan should get together - they deserve eachother. At least Elvis Fan's posts occasionally make me laugh. But hey, it's D.Mok, just click 'unhelpful' and move along.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2012 9:09:23 PM PDT
barbW says:
Hi DK,
I wonder what you think early rock and roll was a reaction against?

As more decades pass it's getting blurry in my mind. I appreciate hits from both sides of the divide, and early rock seems so tame to me now.

It's easy to forget how raucous it seemed to the average music consumer. Because, few of them wanted more than soothing sounds and pretty, clever melodies, they didn't want sex or rebellious statements (or they didn't KNOW they did..). lol Only a narrow segment of the record-buying audience were pushing for the provocative or the indelicate.

Posted on Aug 10, 2012 11:34:14 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 10, 2012 11:34:27 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
> just click 'unhelpful' and move along.

Learned a thing or two from your Meade Skelton trolling, huh? Had his baby yet?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 12:58:24 AM PDT
Music Luver says:
I did not say I was an expert. You implied you were. So? Show us where to see some of your stuff..you must have something online.

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 3:54:24 AM PDT
Severin says:
I just saw an awful commercial for Eleminate 'Em, a pest control company. They have a singing rat dressed like Elvis, white jumpsuit, overweight, big hair, wiggling his hips and saying, "Thank you very much." Reprehensible. How can they demean the King like that?

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 4:51:57 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 4:56:18 AM PDT
D. Mok says:
> How can they demean the King like that?

Don't see how. It's a parody. It doesn't affect what the real Elvis Presley did or looked like.

> Show us where to see some of your stuff..you must have something online.

Why would I bother? You're not worth showing anything to. I'd get smarter responses showing my work to a gerbil.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 5:14:01 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 8:14:57 AM PDT
S. Stalcup says:
Never mind Elvis, what of The Nutcracker? That seems more a slam on King Rat, doesn't it?

Still no answer on the MSA recording. Shame. If there is something out there that's above the fidelity of Rerun's Doobie Brothers bootleg, any info would be smashing.

EDIT: Two unhelpfuls? Yes, perhaps the Nutcracker comment was a bit off-base, but still, hardly merits a down vote or two, does it?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 7:12:45 AM PDT
I recall a Warner Bros. cartoon about dog breeds, and a mutt named "Elvis" came out and shimmied, said, "I ain't nothin' but a Hound Dog." 1956, I think....

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 7:38:47 AM PDT
R&B/rock 'n' roll came out of a bunch of folks armed with portable magnetic tape recorders (the new thing we stole from Nazi Germany, I think it was called a Magnetophone, but I'm not positive of the name. The Allies tried to bomb Hitler and his henchmen, following the radio signals to what they thought were the studios, but could never "get" anyone. In 1945, the Allies found tape decks and were ASTONISHED at the fidelity sound quality, so we stole it, packed it home, and back-engineered the reel-to-reel tape recorder, just like we stole our NASA space rockets) who rented office and studio space, put mattresses up on the walls, and recorded anything they thought they could sell that the major labels (who used disc recording, which required a bigger $$$ industrial machinery operation) ignored. So podunk little out-of-the-way towns like Los Angeles, Chicago, Memphis, Nashville, Cincinnati, etc..., with some kind of local market became recording centers outside of the major labels, more or less based out of New York City. The major recording companies (major meant they owned their own distribution warehousing and record plants) dropped black and hillbilly acts during WWII due to a shellac shortage (78s were made from Burmese beetles offal slathered on trees, and the Japanese invaded Burma during WWII, hence no shellac imports to the U.S. Think of 78s as a kind of record made from glorified cockroaches infesting 3rd world trees.... In the U.S., starting in 1942, you had to trade in "old" records to recycle the shellac for "new" records, and the record companies started adding sand to the mix to stretch what supplies they had), hence the major labels concentrated on white pop records. After WWII, the majors picked up some hillbilly acts, but ignored the black audiences (NY city folks didn't like low people; it was demeaning to sell that stuff). The fly-by-night operators (Capitol Records, Dot Records, and King Records were expanded out of record shops who caught onto a pent up demand not being serviced by Bing Crosby...) recorded local talent to tape, took their recordings to centralized pressing facilities that sprung up to service the trade, and then Mr. Fly-by-Night record company shipped out his records to independent warehousing operators, who distributed to what accounts would stock/play these noxious, lousy, not-polite recordings with code words for sex, booze, and drugs, and the Fly-by-Night record owner would have to figure out how to get the independent warehousing fly-by-night operator to cough up the money he owed placing early Fats Domino and boogie woogie dance hall recordings at whatever wrong-side-of-the-tracks retail dives would sell the things, and any radio station that might spin them at 3AM when no one was listening. A fly-by-night record company could literally go broke after making a BIG hit: owner spends and spends and spends to press 500,000 78s/45s, racks up a big bill to press and ship the records out, the indie warehouse places the records, they sell BIG, mom&pop pay indie warehouse, who closes up shop and skips town with the money.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 7:49:41 AM PDT
"Because, few of them wanted more than soothing sounds and pretty, clever melodies, they didn't want sex or rebellious statements (or they didn't KNOW they did..). lol"

The Andrews Sister "Hold Tight" ("Want some sea food, mama") in the '40s isn't about fish. Roy Brown's "Butcher Pete" isn't about a grocery counter.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 10:35:00 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 10:37:56 AM PDT
DKPete says:
werranth, I don't think it was as much a concious reaction against anything as much as it was a natural musical evolution. I think the media made it THEIR mission to point out to the "older generation" just how "threatening" an influence it was to their kids because it became very obvious that kids took to it in ways that bewildered their parents-hence, it became THEIR music.

Once this became a focal point, I don't doubt that certain rock and rollers took advantage of it and ran with with it to promote their careers and image. I really don't believe Elvis to be among them.

That's a very loaded question and a good one; my answer is by no means complete. We can discuss it back and forth; it's quite a topic.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 11:42:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 11:43:31 AM PDT
Music Luver says:
So you can't even give me a temporary Adultfinder passcode???

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 1:51:26 PM PDT
Severin says:
Children need to break away from their parents at some point so often they rebel with music. Swing music upset people, then early rock 'n' roll, then the Beatles and the British invasion then the psychedelic rock, hard rock, etc.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 2:34:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 2:42:55 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Or someone like you who posts inflammatory comments with no intent other than starting an argument.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 2:35:39 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Good question. There is no other way.

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 2:41:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 11, 2012 3:11:10 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Someone mentioned the Sun recordings. I love all of those recordings......Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Elvis, Carl Perkins and all the others.

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 3:04:06 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
> Or someone like you who posts inflammatory comments with no intent other than starting an argument.

And yet you keep responding. Who's the idiot?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 3:26:28 PM PDT
Brian says:
You.

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 3:28:43 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Early Elvis Performances

http://youtu.be/2MnmIVBSZYM

http://youtu.be/l1Obxq3kvnc

http://youtu.be/B-OMScSK_rM

http://youtu.be/8sS9zuIi470

http://youtu.be/mLSgqH2BOeg

http://youtu.be/6G6oDwm_WFo

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 5:15:15 PM PDT
D. Mok says:
A Meade Skelton flunky doesn't get to make comments on anything.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 5:21:39 PM PDT
Brian says:
>Had his baby yet?

I'm a man, I can't have a baby. Still in your creative slump I see.

Posted on Aug 11, 2012 5:35:24 PM PDT
Brian says:
I'm anticipating seeing some of D.Mok's masterpieces. Will they be available here on Amazon?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 11, 2012 6:18:30 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Aug 11, 2012 7:24:41 PM PDT]
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  84
Total posts:  2078
Initial post:  Aug 4, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 18, 2014

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