Customer Discussions > Music forum

Elvis Presley


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 526-550 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:41:44 PM PST
RVACountryLover, man do you and your music creep me out!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 7:53:45 PM PST
Severin says:
Daniel, I agree although I think Bob Dylan may have written a few more songs. It's close though. Dylan has more unreleased tracks (they've come out on the Bootleg Series) but Paul has recorded several classical pieces.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 7:28:57 PM PST
ELVIS FAN says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 7:30:49 PM PST
ELVIS FAN says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 10:16:13 PM PST
ELVIS FAN says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 11:01:14 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 1:30:10 AM PST
A. Strong says:
Another stupid Meade Skelton thread....
Elvis, died on the crapper...Poetic justice.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 3:09:18 AM PST
ronct says:
Lets be real. Elvis was simply a rock'n roll marketing tool. He had a decent voice, handsome which was great for attracting young teenage girls and swag to carry it off. What Elvis didn't have is a hand in the development of rock'n roll. Elvis didn't write songs or play an instrument very well. Elvis was unique in that he was a white guy that brought rock'n roll to the mainstream households. Rock'n roll (the devil's music) was being performed by the black guy long before Elvis came along. Unfortunately, after Elvis returned from the army all those qualities of excitement about him unfortunately had mostly dwindled. People love to quote artists mentioning Elvis as their inspiration to getting involved in music. It is true Elvis was the first big teenage idol. What people rarely mention is quotes like when an artists as John Lennon asked Elvis in 1964 "why did you stopped making rock'n roll?" The label King of rock'n roll is a joke and "first" is more appropriate.

Posted on Nov 20, 2012 6:29:48 AM PST
vivazappa says:
ronct:
Allow me to re-write your open thought from above...
"Let's be real. Elvis was simply a tool!"

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 8:20:24 AM PST
ronct says: "It is true Elvis was the first big teenage idol."

Maybe where rock and roll is concerned but before him was Frank Sinatra with his effect on the bobbysoxers. And in a previous era, it was Rudy Vallée and the flappers.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 6:06:12 PM PST
I agree with those who said they liked Elvis' early music....those on Sun Records,
and some RCA. When I didn't like his music is when he went "Las Vegas" and did
all those over-the-top songs.....to say nothing of his ridiculous white jumpsuits,
huge collars & belts, scarves etc. The music became bogged down and 'moaning'.
Give me his early music anyday....I still listen to it.

Posted on Dec 13, 2012 6:36:40 PM PST
D. Mok says:
> Fact, Lennon and McCartney were the most prolific songwriting team ever.

No, not a fact. Lennon-McCartney wrote about 230 songs that have been released. George Gershwin wrote over 500 songs, and Elton John and Bernie Taupin have several hundred. Bob Dylan and Neil Young probably have hundreds of songs and only half may have seen the light of day. And professional songwriters such as Mann-Weil, Goffin-King, Diane Warren, Leiber-Stoller and Holland-Dozier-Holland probably number in the thousands for each songwriter/songwriting team, because they write a lot of material that doesn't get chosen for the final release, a far higher ratio than artists or bands who write.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 9:12:12 PM PST
DKPete says:
Would "prolific", in the case of songwriting, mean the amount of songs overall or the amount of songs put out in a limiited given time period? I could be wrong, but I would have thought it means the latter. I still don't know if that would put L and M at the top of the list...but it would help determine where they stand if this could be clarified.

Posted on Dec 13, 2012 10:45:13 PM PST
Elvis was the biggest cash cow to ever come out of a cabin.

Never has one man managed to waste so much talent whilst simultaneously accumulating so much wealth for those in his orbit.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 12:23:31 AM PST
I've got The Complete E.P. Masters collection (30CD/814 tracks) -- there's some good stuff there, but also lots of crap.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 12:41:29 AM PST
Hinch says:
Wow! Some collection there!

I have quite a few of his albums on vinyl and cd, and several 'greatest hits' box sets on vinyl. I also have several dvds, including the deluxe '68 Comeback Special.

I like his 50s RCA recordings most.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 7:02:55 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> Would "prolific", in the case of songwriting, mean the amount [sic] of songs overall or the amount [sic] of songs put out in a limiited given time period?

Both. But 300 songs in 10 years -- and that's rounding up drastically -- is not that prolific by professional standards. Also, Beatles songs tend to be more complicated. My bet would be that Bob Dylan was far more prolific, because Dylan would be content writing 100 songs in I-IV-V, since his songs are really distinguished only by lyrics; the melodies are an afterthought. And if you're content with the same melodies and old blues/folk structures, you can write 12 songs a day, easy.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 9:17:08 AM PST
When I made my statement, I was not refering to lifetime numbers. I was refering to the time period in which they wrote. I should not have said fact as I can't back that up with any numbers as D Mok has done. I should have been more specific as to what I meant. In my opinion, Lennon and McCartney were the most prolific writers during th 60's. I also can't prove that McCartney has written more songs than Dylan, Young or anyone else so I will retract that statement as fact.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 4:27:47 PM PST
I agree. It seems like Elvis never really got entirely used to
the fame and fortune that he accumulated. He's not the first,
and surely not the last one that seemed to get himself swamped
in excessive buying of all sorts of things....wasting money...drugs..
etc. It's an old timeworn story of movie and rock stars who came to meteoric fame,
only to burn out.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 7:30:44 PM PST
I don't think it was his "burning out" that was the problem.

It had more to do with him putting his career totally in the hands of the "Colonel".

As an example, because of the "Colonels" illegal immigrant status, Elvis never left American soil except to join the army (also a "Colonel" approved idea).

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 10:04:44 PM PST
"He was just a simple country boy from Tupelo"

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 10:15:26 PM PST
One of Presleys great character triats was his loyalty, and it was this extreme sense of loyalty that was largely responsible for his ultimate undoing.

I highly recommend Elvis and the Colonel to get a better picture.

"While the authors do not attempt a psychobiography, they argue forcefully that Parker's carnival background made him a conniving money-grubber who eventually destroyed Presley's career."

From the product description.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 10:29:39 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2012 12:33:02 PM PST
The first year they were conducting tours through Graceland (1983) I rolled into Memphis on a ten day drive from San Francisco, Ca. to my destination in Norfolk, Va and I bought my ticket across the street from the mansion at a shop and took the tour (they won't let you upstairs due to privacy that the family wanted to preserve) and it was something to see and the jungle room told me that big E wasn't dealing with a full deck as this place was T A C K Y (to be nice) and it was a big playhouse from room to room. There was a handball court in the back inside it's own structure and the Cadillac with the gold records on it's ceiling and off to the right of the house in the back were the graves of E and his parents and there was a few acres in the back where he could have had horses (but it wasn't mentioned) and one guide kept rambling on about who the jet "Lisa Marie" that was going to be stationed across the street and that was going to be a separate tour. And I haven't been back but I do wonder how much crap is on Elvis Presley Blvd today built there to take money from E-fans.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 10:30:33 PM PST
Hinch says:
>amount [sic] of songs<

I'm trying to understand what's wrong with the use of the phrase "amount of songs".

Btw, you overlooked "limiited[sic] given time period".

You're slipping!

:-)

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 12:17:06 PM PST
Steelers fan says:
Vernon Presley died in 1979.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 12:44:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2012 12:48:27 PM PST
Well, it was almost 30 years ago and Vernon's name was mentioned about 300 times during that tour as living in there after big E died so that's a more then a fuzzy memory and I'm more clearheaded about the Jack Daniels Distillary as it is located out there in Moore County and it's a dry county so they cannot sell booze anywhere near that landmark so I was more sober in eastern Tennessee!
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  84
Total posts:  2078
Initial post:  Aug 4, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 18, 2014

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 9 customers

Search Customer Discussions