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Was Magical Mystery Tour the Beatles red-headed stepchild?


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Showing 26-50 of 118 posts in this discussion
Posted on Dec 3, 2012 6:46:40 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 6:46:59 AM PST
vivazappa says:
Funny that someone should bring this topic up.
I was never a big fan of MMT until the mono box set.
I play it often now.
I flows and has a battery of great songs.
Wish I'd figured that out sooner...

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 7:12:54 AM PST
Geezerguy says:
Last edited by the author 23 minutes ago
vivazappa says:
Funny that someone should bring this topic up.
I was never a big fan of MMT until the mono box set.
I play it often now.
I flows and has a battery of great songs.
Wish I'd figured that out sooner...

Yeah... I love this album also. The actual concept and resulting film may have been half-baked (or wholly-baked as the case may be). But the songs are wonderful.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:52:27 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 9:01:09 AM PST
Baby You're A Rich Man is my favorite Beatle song and I put Magical Mystery Tour in my Beatle top 5.
Your friend should have already heard the entire second side on the radio before he even bought the album. If he liked what he heard, why return it?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 8:54:28 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 12:06:55 PM PST
No, not Meade. Disses Limbaugh and Hannity. More rational than EF, not as cloying as Meade.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 9:42:21 AM PST
zlh67 says:
For an album that's not really an album, I thought MMT was pretty damn good! It's a collection of songs that don't appear on other albums, so however haphazardly or patchwork it was assembled, it is a Beatles album. It doesn't flow like Sgt Pepper or have the consistency in sound/flavor like Rubber Soul or Revolover, but based on the strength of just the individual songs, it's essential Beatles to me.

I rank it behind The White Album and possibly Rubber Soul and/or Revolver, but I listen to MMT more than most other Beatles albums, including 2 other highly acclaimed releases (Sgt Pepper & Abbey Road).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 9:58:45 AM PST
Michael Topper says: "There's no sub-par Beatles product, IMO. Even "Yellow Submarine" (well, the group portion on side one) has "Hey Bulldog" and "It's All Too Much"!

I agree with you, Michael. It's just that if I was FORCED to pick the least excellent Beatles album, the 'Yellow Submarine' soundtrack would be it, if only for the side two stuff that the Beatles weren't really involved in.

"Hey Bulldog" is a great song -- it almost sounds like Lennon going heavy metal !

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 10:37:17 AM PST
Dare I say I enjoy MMT more than the majority of Sgt. Pepper???

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 10:40:57 AM PST
Everyone's entitled to their own preferences. I personally feel that 'Revolver' is a better album than either 'Sgt. Pepper' or 'Abbey Road'.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 10:50:02 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 1:43:35 PM PST
Any band that puts out records in the league of: "Revolver" "Sgt. Pepper's" and "Abbey Road" and songs such as: "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" may be thought highly of four decades later. The Beatles bashers such as: Meade Skelton/ELVIS FAN/ Haufe wouldn't know a decent song or album if it fell on them/him from the skies.

And don't forget the: "One Direction is better than The Beatles" thread was one way this nutbag pushed his point. What you guys have posted up there proves The Beatles produced a large quantity of great music that is timeless. Wanna be living in a world that doesn't have "Revolver" or "Abbey Road" in it?

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 10:57:05 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 11:00:40 AM PST
Exactly - great point, Philip. What continues to amaze me is that the Beatles wrote, recorded and released their entire A+ output in seven-and-a-half years, whereas it takes most bands today 2-3 years just to put out ONE album (and even then, the album usually has a couple of duds on it).

Bands like the Beatles, the Stones and the Who worked their collective asses off in the '60's. If they weren't recording, they were touring and appearing on both stage and TV, then it was right back into the studio. And yet, the material stayed superb. The Beatles didn't begin to get a break from the back-and-forth routine until the recording of 'Sgt. Pepper'.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 11:05:29 AM PST
Robert ~

What knocks me on the ground about this band is the GROWTH that happened to them in that seven and a half years from "Love Me Do" to the closing notes of the medley that closes down "Abbey Road." The Beatles are four men that have gone through a hundred years of changes in those years and look at the wealth of great music they made in such a short time. Wanna bash this band? Good luck!

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 11:16:03 AM PST
Besides the excellence of Lennon and McCartney as a songwriting team, they were also fortunate to have a genius producer in George Martin, who was like a fatherly figure that guided them along each step of the way.

It simply couldn't happen again. Every element of the Beatles came together in the perfect way: four personalities that complemented one another; three terrific singers; one of the best songwriting teams of all time; a manager who truly cared; a producer who knew what greatness he had on his hands; excellent timing with the social and cultural environments of the day. Talk about four guys who were truly blessed during that decade !

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 11:26:57 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 11:48:01 AM PST
November 1963 JFK is shot down in Dallas, Texas and in February 1964 The Beatles are on Ed Sullivan's TV show and THEN the 1960's begin in force. America is lifted up from despair by four guys from a British seaport that bring back Chuck Berry and The Everly Brothers with a twist of their own new music that is fresh and very fun. The culture of the World was changed by John, Paul, George and Ringo as young boys were growing their hair long like Moe Howard and gazed at shiny electric guitars sitting inside windows of music shops.

"It simply couldn't happen again" THAT is the posting of the week and I do agree that the events of late 1963 early 1964 will never occur again and so many of us out here do want some of these kids to pick up the torch and stick a middle finger in our faces and do something new. Forget the corporations and the crappy no-talent shows on the TV and auto-tune and all that other garbage...It's time for Junior to ROCK!

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 11:31:53 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 11:35:57 AM PST
Unfortunately, not only do the bands of today not have the talent of the Beatles, but they also don't have the work ethic.

Can you imagine how horrible Pete Best must have felt after the Beatles struck it big ? Talk about someone who probably needed long-term therapy !

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 11:46:14 AM PST
The 1930's had Bing Crosby
The 1940's had Frank Sinatra
The 1950's had Elvis
The 1960's had The Beatles

I am lucky enough to remember the sixties.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 12:29:57 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 12:30:07 PM PST
vivazappa says:
For me the 60's went from the day JFK died (11-22-1963) to the day Nixon resigned (Aug 1974)...
MUSIC WAS NEVER BETTER than during that 10 years and 9 months.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 12:31:44 PM PST
Each of the other decades you named also had other great artists that had a cultural impact:

The '30's also had Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington and all of the big swing bands
The '40's also had Biilie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and the beginnings of great jazz artsts like Charlie Parker and Miles Davis
The '50's also had Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis
The '60's also had Dylan, the Stones, the Who, Hendrix and many others

What dominates today ? Rap an hip-hop. I'll take a pass.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 12:50:08 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 1:23:36 PM PST
Vivazappa & Robert ~

(For me) The 60's ended at the "Charlie Manson Love Festival" that was called Altamont about thirty miles to the east of my home in December 1969. The 1970's had big stars (Elton John, David Bowie) and rock got corporate and the untity of the 1960's really was pulled apart into many directions and it was now tagged: country-rock, folk-rock, hard-rock, stadium-rock, singer-songwriters, prog-rock, glam-rock, blues-rock, heavy metal, punk rock, retro-rock ETC. and by 1976 with Peter Frampton and Fleetwood Mac changing it it into a mega-bucks business that has since gotten worse and worse. Disco, was the first result of a people and culture in serious decline and the 1970's was all of that and more.

The greed and the stupidity of today's music business is the reason you hear such crap on the radio (and crap is not a new thing!) Not a one of those corporate suits loves music those crumb-bums love M O N E Y!!! But, as in the 1970's I enjoyed music of The Ramones and Kansas. Today I can listen to Yo Yo Ma then next year (2013) I will be listening to the new disc from Toad The Wet Sprocket (they start recording it this month) so there is still mucho good stuff for my ears to hear.

"Rock is dead they say....LONG LIVE ROCK!!!"

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 1:00:26 PM PST
Dr. Mikey says:
@Robert B. Your two references to the Beatles' work ethic are right on the mark. I have read than while they were in Hamburg, even after playing 6 hrs or more a night, when they got up the next afternoon they were on stage rehearsing. I'm not sure our young folks today can relate to that. I enjoyed my 30-yr teaching career, but one reason for "early" retirement was the students' increasing sense of entitlement.

On another note, I think your comments on "Revolver" are also being borne out in surveys. It has overtaken Pepper, Abbey Road, and a few others others (I like Rubber Soul) as the Beatles' best album in some polls.

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 1:22:59 PM PST
Geezerguy says:
I heard Todd Rundgren interviewed about the second Woodstock Festival. I probably won't get it exactly right, but I think he said something along the lines of, "At the first Woodstock, everybody at least thought they believed in something. At the second Woodstock, nobody believed in anything." Apologies to Todd if I got that wrong. But the Beatles came along in the aftermath of JFK's assassination when we still clinged to hope that it was OK to dream. Music could be about the basest drives, but with the Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Who, etc., it was also about expanding our concepts of what the world could be. At some later point nihilism and despair became potent viewpoints in music. I dunno... just rambling, but MMT was from the time of dreams and hope. What says it better than All You Need is Love and The Fool on the Hill?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 1:25:58 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 1:27:35 PM PST
Bands today don't really seem to hone their craft. And I do think to get better you have to continually write and record new songs. Nowadays it's record an album and take 3 years to tour. Most bands in the 60's released an album per year, at least. The Stones in the late 60's and early 70's would play two concerts a day..A doubleheader of sorts. Can you imagine an artist doing that today?

This, of course, isn't true of all bands. The Drive By Truckers had a strong work ethic.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 1:29:37 PM PST
John Lennon said it best in the early seventies: "I am proud of the music that The Beatles made as it was about love and peace and there was a positive message in all of that music."
And that is all you need...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 3, 2012 1:31:39 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 3, 2012 1:32:06 PM PST
Yes, Happiness is a Warm Gun, Run For Your Life and Yer Blues make me feel fuzzy all over...LOL

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 1:34:46 PM PST
Makes you wonder if John had a sense of humor as well....

Posted on Dec 3, 2012 1:38:24 PM PST
Geezerguy says:
Happiness is a Warm Gun is another way of saying All You Need is Love... If I'm understanding the metaphor.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  31
Total posts:  118
Initial post:  Dec 2, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 6, 2013

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