Customer Discussions > Music forum

Vinyl or CD - Which sounds better


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 99 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 24, 2012 6:13:20 AM PST
stevign says:
re: "But play a CD done the correct way, one you can turn up, and that sound is pretty difficult to beat."

True dat. Not all CD remasters fell victim to the Loudness Wars, so a "fair" comparison needs to be made before one can decide which they like and if they actually care.

Posted on Nov 23, 2012 8:21:29 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 23, 2012 8:26:39 PM PST
I've been giving this some more thought as I was playing some CDs I really enjoy listening to because they sound so good and I've come to this conclusion: I like vinyl better and think it sounds better because of....The Loudness Wars. When CDs are mastered correctly and the dynamic range is kept intact, and you're able to turn your stereo up without it exploding, the sound comes through so full and clear. Unfortunately too many CDs aren't mastered properly and the sound just stinks. I even played some vinyl records that I have CD copies of and searching the DR database, came to this realization that it's more about the dynamic range than the vinyl itself (although I do love the packaging of vinyl, the size of it, and the physical act of playing a record). Compare any current recordings, CD vs vinyl and you'll see. But I knew this already because it's one of the reason's I began purchasing vinyl again to begin with.

So, maybe I don't really feel that vinyl sounds 'better' but it does sound different. But play a CD done the correct way, one you can turn up, and that sound is pretty difficult to beat.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 4:48:19 PM PST
<<<Ever AB mono/stereo for this behaviour>>>
no, it seemed just normal at the time..the 'playing the record flat' phenom just was more readily apparent in the softer passages.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 3:45:49 PM PST
J. Remson says:
Nice point made; classical. I will certainly take a hard look at the phenomena you mention; soft "ppp" disappearing. Ever AB mono/stereo for this behaviour?

Posted on Nov 15, 2012 11:28:00 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 15, 2012 11:41:47 AM PST
<<
I wonder about damage to vinyl from poor quality systems played over time>>>
The type of music one listens to also has to be taken into account.
I listen to mostly classical.... and the problems with LPs are magnified in classical.
things such as 'end of side' distortion, music with lengths longer than 25 minutes just seem to become more annoying.

Soft passages('pppp') just 'wore out' in LPs more of often no matter how 'high end' my system was or how well kept up my vinyl records.
after a dozen listenings the sound had degraded.

I just recieved Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen (Super Deluxe)
I had this puppy on 19LPs, that is a lot of flipping discs in the middle of the music.
cleaning the LP and stylus and all that stuff just to hear the next note that composer intended to be heard without a pause. Sure since four of the 'tracks' are greater than 80 minutes, there are still 4 mid music breaks on the 14 cds, but that certainly beats the 31 that were there in the days of LP.(and I don't miss the loss of clarity of the loud passages at the end of the side either.

there is even a blu ray audio disc that has all 15 hours on a single disc.

balance your tone arms, clean your records as best you can, listen to your discs that were produced for a turntable(mellower songs near the end of the side).
However, the classical composers did not write their music with the 25 minute side limitation in mind and that is what really trumps it for me.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2012 10:06:06 AM PST
J. Remson says:
I don't know about thin CD's but I use a Linn also; and the LP12 is soft in the lower frequencies so to compare that to digital in any definitive way is a difficult thing. I mean there is so many variables in setting up an analog system. To me it just sounds more musical. Anyway the way CD's are going this argument regarding CD vs Vinyl might be moot in a few years because they won't be made anymore.. Vinyl Vs digital downloads.
I wonder about damage to vinyl from poor quality systems played over time. I know of microscopic pictures of groove damage and I can hear if it is extreme; but mostly I don't hear it on the records I buy used from shops after I clean them thoroughly. If I do; I just return them. In fact; I have white glued a couple real hard cases and they came out pretty good sounding. Very surprising.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2012 6:03:37 AM PST
stevign says:
It wouldn't surprise me. It's also nice to know you like Jazz.

Posted on Nov 13, 2012 11:47:38 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 14, 2012 1:34:48 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:39:35 PM PST
Vinyl does sound better than the thinness of C.D. Your sound doesn't have to diminish the more you play your records. I bought a Linn Sondek @ $3000 for the turntable, $1000 for the tone arm, about $800 for the cartridge and each stylus has to be glued in at $70. I know this sounds like a lot of money and it is but if you want optimum sound from vinyl you have to spend some bucks. I also only handle records by the edge and the label as any moisture can be very noticeable. I don't believe in plastic sleeves only paper and I will never buy a record that has been played in the shop. The reason for this is that you don't know the condition of the record shops stylus. Better to buy overseas pressings. I know this may sound like a load of rubbish but If you really want to go down the vinyl path then its well worth thinking about.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:39:15 PM PST
Vinyl does sound better than the thinness of C.D. Your sound doesn't have to diminish the more you play your records. I bought a Linn Sondek @ $3000 for the turntable, $1000 for the tone arm, about $800 for the cartridge and each stylus has to be glued in at $70. I know this sounds like a lot of money and it is but if you want optimum sound from vinyl you have to spend some bucks. I also only handle records by the edge and the label as any moisture can be very noticeable. I don't believe in plastic sleeves only paper and I will never buy a record that has been played in the shop. The reason for this is that you don't know the condition of the record shops stylus. Better to buy overseas pressings. I know this may sound like a load of rubbish but If you really want to go down the vinyl path then its well worth thinking about.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:30:04 PM PST
Music Luver says:
LOL, this is hilarious. I get emails of this thread and who's name came through for these negative statements by RVA....none other than EP Haufe..gotcha!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:22:46 PM PST
Music Luver says:
stevign - I doubt that dude even knows who Benny Carter is....

I have that CD by the way.. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:20:56 PM PST
Music Luver says:
Your Kmart equipment probably does make noise.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:19:54 PM PST
Music Luver says:
This guy is a fool. Those statements are totally incorrect.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 10:18:41 PM PST
Music Luver says:
Has EF changed his Amazon name?

Posted on Nov 13, 2012 5:45:41 PM PST
The 'warm sound' is a lack of high frequencies, including recording studio echo. It also is the product of low frequency distortion inherent in analog sound reproduction. It is almost totally inaudible to most people, but, it has the effect of making the well produced frequencies in the mid-range sound clear and up-front, or 'warm'. You also lose certain instruments in analog sound reproduction. I've heard songs on remastered, 24 bit CD's where you can hear instruments that you never heard before, like triangles. The delicate, high frequency sound of a triangle is virtually inaudible on most LP's, but, on well mastered CD's, it is clear as a bell.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 5:20:47 PM PST
J. Remson says:
I think when people say they hear a "warmer sound"; they mean rolled off on the frequency extremes with a lot of midrange energy. A lot of digital sound is less relaxing to my ears due to artifacts of the encoding process. Making the sound brighter and more defined. Especially on the high end of the range. Thats about as technical an explanation I've heard that serves the question without creating vast quantities of dispute. Instead of "warm" maybe smooth would be a better term; who knows? IMHO. Sorry if that doesn't really answer the technical aspect of your request. In fact it seems not to have any real technical credibility at all. Just my 2.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 4:38:46 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 19, 2012 3:52:42 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 1:03:36 PM PST
stevign says:
re: "I've never heard a CD sound "lush"."

You've obviously never heard that CD. Of course not all CDs are going to sound that good but I never said they do either. Maybe it's because the majority of my CDs are Jazz and Jazz recordings didn't get caught up in the horrible Loudness Wars like Rock & Roll did. Just a thought.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 9:18:56 AM PST
Ive never heard a CD sound "lush". I have heard more clarity on CD at times (and I do mean sparingly) as opposed to records and tapes. But lush would be the last word I would use to describe their sound.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 9:17:54 AM PST
Im sorry to tell you this, but I have several CDs that are not longer playable because they acciidently cracked or scratched up and scuffed. The laster cannot read the CD anymore. So CDs are permanently damaged beyond that, and no polishing it up can make it play.

Posted on Nov 13, 2012 8:33:20 AM PST
EvenSteven says:
I prefer vinyl, some cd's do sound pretty good when mastered & eq'd properly.
To my ears, vinyl (analog) is more "dimesional" (some tones recede into the back ground like they were intended to do) vs the loud, crystaline, hi def & usually overly compressed digital experience). Cd tends to have harsher sounds in certain registers & some of these flaws have never been figured out especially in percussion/cymbals. & yes vinyl LP's have their inherent flaws too. Both have their + & - s.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 5:39:59 AM PST
stevign says:
re: "CDs have a very narrow thin sound, but they may lack the surface noise, however whatever that is, they also have compressed sound that is harsh sounding"

I don't know what you are listening to or what you're playing it on but my CDs don't sound like that at all. Take for instance Further Definitions by Benny Carter, if I were describe the sound in one word, it would be "lush".

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 13, 2012 5:26:24 AM PST
I am talking the mastering process where they convert the analogue waves to digital. If there is anything this discussion has made me realize is I no longer care which is better.

They are both different and young people I have spoken to who purchase vinyl have told me it's the 'live' sound of vinyl that they like, and the feeling as if 'you're right there'.

So, to each their own. I have heard crappy records but the best sounding ones produce such an amazing depth and realness to my ears, so whatever the reason, real or imagined, that works for me.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 11:45:22 PM PST
RVA, You can polish the playing surface of a CD to make the data layer readable. Scratched records are permanently damaged, whether you can still play them or not.
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Music forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  30
Total posts:  99
Initial post:  Nov 8, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 24, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 4 customers

Search Customer Discussions