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Calling all Kinks


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In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 3:42:14 PM PDT
Cordo says:
wolfgangsvault.com has a numbers of concerts from The Kinks, mostly from the period in 1972 when they were touring behind Muswell Hillbillies. There might be a couple from the tour supporting "Everybody's in Show Biz." They also have at least one from 1977. If you can find the LP verison of "The Kinks' Greatest Hits" from 1976, it has some excerpts from a Carnegie Hall concert that year. "Here Comes Yet Another Day" really cooks with a blazing solo from Dave. The CD version has more songs, but for some reason, they took the live cuts and the alternative mixes of "Twentieth Century Man" (true stereo), "One of the Survivors" (true stereo plus Dave singing "Johnny Thunder's" speech completely solo although the end is cut off some), and "Sitting by the Riverside (true stereo) and replaced them with the studio versions.

"One from the Road" from 1980 came out in both CD and VHS (later DVD) form. The Kinks were touring behind "Low Budget." I was disappointed that the DVD did not have any songs on it that were not also on the CD.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 4:24:54 PM PDT
Cordo says:
In Europe, "I Need You" was the B-side to "Set Me Free," so it got pretty good playing time, although as the B-side maybe not on the radio. The single I wish I had bought printed the song's title as "A Need You." That would be a collector's item.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 4:33:39 PM PDT
Cordo says:
Dave's vocals are dreadful, as you say, but I do like the backing vocal and instrumental tracks. Shel Talmy produced both The Kinks and The Who at this time. On the collection "Two's Missing," which came out in I think 1987, the first track is The Who's version of "Bald Headed Woman," recorded in 1965 after The Kinks' did it. It's pretty much a note-for-not remake of The Kinks' version. Listening to Roger Daltry imitate Ray Davies is a hoot!

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 4:51:48 PM PDT
Cordo says:
If you can find a vinyl copy of The Great Lost Kinks Album, they are both there.

I have Dave's first three albums on LP plus the two-fer. I think the tracks are complete, but I will look.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 5:11:42 PM PDT
Cordo says:
I think I read Four More Respectable Gentleman was the first version of what eventually became "Village Green Preservation Society." GLKA same out in 1972 and included two songs, "Groovy Movies" and "This Man He Weeps Tonight," which were recorded with John Dalton in 1969. "Til Death Do Us Part" was recorded for the BBC in 1971, I believe.

The really amazing part is that VGPS, as released, had 16 tracks. Several extra tracks (I think 6) came out on GLKA. Also, they recorded Dave's "There Is No Life Without Love." Plus, The Kinks recorded a couple of singles, including "Days," all in 1968. A prodigious output.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 6:53:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 14, 2012 7:02:33 PM PDT
Is that Volume 2 you refer to?
Both volumes were good.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 6:58:10 PM PDT
It was assumed sometimes by some record labels that no one ever played the B side of a single, 'so who cares what went on it?'
I think they were wrong, and a lot of buyers would often find a song on the B, that was better than the A side.

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 7:02:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 14, 2012 7:04:35 PM PDT
I don't have The Who's "Bald Headed Woman" but should get it.
You're right when you say the instrumental parts of "Bald Mountain" were OK, but I still think Dave was dreadful vocally. I didn't think he was good vocally on "I'm a Lover Not a Fighter" either.
I do think, however, that he was pretty good on "Long Tall Shorty".

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 7:11:09 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 14, 2012 7:11:23 PM PDT
I have the first two Dave Davies albums on a 'two for one' release.
According to the notes:
"Owing to CD running time restrictions, 'Move Over' has been omitted from 'Dave Davies' ".

In reply to an earlier post on May 14, 2012 7:13:45 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 14, 2012 9:49:21 PM PDT
There were 15 tracks on the UK mono release of VGPS.
The 12 track stereo version was released in New Zealand as well as Europe. This version finally appeared on CD in 1998 along with the 15 track mono album.
As far as sound and mixing go, I prefer the mono album.
Some outtakes from VGPS appeared on the GLKA. Like Rosemary Rose, Misty Water, Mr Songbird.
Mr Songbird was on the stereo VGPS.

I think Till Death... may have been recorded as far back as 1969, bassist Pete Quaife said he remembered being at the recording sessions. The movie of Till Death... I'm sure was released in '69, with the TV series following later.

Posted on May 15, 2012 1:13:06 AM PDT
Nate s. says:
Thanx for the feedback on "I NEED YOU". Has anyone heard of "drivin'?" This title showed up on disc 2 of my ultimate Kinks collection after i had downloaded it to my media player, wrong titles on my player, correct on the cd. Did i forget one somehow.
I think Daves vocals on "sleepless night" (Sleepwalker) are perfect, this is one of my top 5 albums, he does a great job on trust your heart and when you were a child also.

Posted on May 15, 2012 2:02:40 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 3:43:38 AM PDT
Drivin' was a track from the 1969 album 'Arthur'.

A mono mix of the song was also released as a single. It appears as a bonus track on the 2000 edition of the 'Arthur' album.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:04:51 AM PDT
Cordo says:
Sorry, don't understand, if you are replying to me. Vol. 2 of what?

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:13:42 AM PDT
Cordo says:
I'm on a train right now, and I don't always hti the right keys. I think I send my last post accidentally mid-post. When I bought the Dave Clark Five's single "TryToo Hard," I really prefered the B-side, "I'm Thinkin"", much better. It was a bar-chord progression reminiscent of he Kinks, and I just about wore it out. I still have it.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:18:56 AM PDT
Cordo says:
"Bald-Heaed Woman" starts off the compilation "Two's Missing." Get the vinyl of that and "Who's Missing" from 1985 if you can find them. They have liner notes, whereas the CD's don't. I don't remember if it appears on th expanded version of The Who's first album. I am sureDaltry wished he could bury those tapes in a deep hole somewhere.

Dave's singing on "Kinks" was generally more enthusiastic than good. He improved greatly as time went on. Of course, Ray's wasn't anything to write home about, either.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:20:30 AM PDT
Cordo says:
"Move Over" is on the version of "Unfinished Busness" that I have.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 11:20:32 PM PDT
Volume 2 of 'Golden Hour of The Kinks'.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 11:23:55 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 11:33:06 PM PDT
I know both songs. Love 'Try Too Hard'.
'I'm Thinking' I also like, I think it runs for 1minute 29, or something.
I'll assume 'I'm Thinking' was a US B side. Elsewhere the B side of 'Try Too Hard' was a track called 'All Night Long'.

Many of the DC Five's B sides were SUPERIOR to the A sides, especially with the later single releases.
Clark's choices for the A sides for some of the later singles were not always wise.

Posted on May 16, 2012 4:48:56 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Aug 20, 2013 3:44:28 AM PDT]

Posted on May 16, 2012 9:18:06 AM PDT
EvenSteven says:
Agree with prior posts re Dave Davies contributions on the early sides produced by Talmy.
Dave's ragged but right guitar is lead on the hits but there are some lp trax like "So Mystifying" that is unmistakeable Jimmy Page & there are probobly a few other covers mentioned like "Bald Headed Woman" and such that are Page as well. Many of the ealy Kinks do feature the awesome time keeping of Bobby Graham who like Page was a Talmy session ace. Avory did play more or less full time by 1966 at the insistence of Ray. There was a very "rocky" relationship with Dave & Mick through out their entire history as a band. I was lucky enough to see em a few times in the 70s.

Re, Dave, in my opinion he was nothing short of a sound pioneer & luckily Talmy obliged his request to plug in his home made "fart box" into his amp to get that unmistakeable "overdrive" that catapulted "You Really Got Me" to #1.
He never got the credit he deserved & was overshadowed by the very crowded field of the so called "guitar heros" in his native UK. I hear him going "sound wise" in the same direction as well estiblished by Link Wray also one of Towsend's heros.
& also mentioned in an above thread was Raisa Davies many uncredited vocal appearances on Kinks records that gave the "final" touch or magic to the finished product. Her work the monumental "Something Else" is absolutely sublime. I dont know how else to put it or just "inspired".

Posted on May 16, 2012 11:38:02 AM PDT
Eddie H. says:
I can't believe with a release date in June that their is no track listing for the Kinks At The BBC Box....I e-mailed Sactuary Records and Dave Emblems web site to no avail....

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 11:49:00 AM PDT
MiBoDoCa says:
Eddie, You need to pick this up. Killer Roy Wood Tribute: The Flashcubes - Sportin' Wood

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 7:12:31 PM PDT
Cordo says:
If you have heard the "Live at the BBC" collection, at one point an interviewer describes The Kinks as five members of the shaggy set. Presumably, # 5 was Raisa who was obviously at that show. Mick runs a group called the Kast-off Kinks that gets together occasionally and does old Kinks tunes. John Dalton, John Gosling, and Raisa Daives are also part of that. I read that Mick reads "Dedication Follower of Fashion," and the reviewer said he was great. I haven't heard that they have made any trips to the US.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 9:05:46 PM PDT
I have written about this elsewhere (on the Golden Hour of the Kinks Vol 1/vinyl page), but I have to join you guys on mentioning this great collection. I had Vol. 1 on vinyl, with 20 songs, probably mono, and probably pretty bad sound--but what a GREAT collection! I never tired of it. After I had my iPod I made a playlist that duplicated that record. I don't know that I ever got Vol. 2, though. My pal used to always talk about Kink Kronikles as his favorite greatest hits package, but I'd always stand up for Golden Hour..... I probably didn't pay much more for it than you did yours, Bernard, and I probably got it at Music Plus or maybe Tower, as it was "an import". Both of those chain stores are long gone, sheesh!!!

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 9:06:16 PM PDT
Cordo i love the comments from the BBC MC kind of funny and formal at the same time, very indicative of that time period.

Gotta say, Dave is such a great riff writer. He is on the list of rippin, dirty riffs as far as i'm concerned.

I always wonder why the Lola record is not mentioned by Kinks fans or great albums lists. Dave has so many great riffs on that one and the unity of the sound is cool. Many concept records by Ray but sonically and rockin' wise i think it ranks with any record.

What was the fart box/overdrive that Dave had? Never heard about that. I've heard him tell the story of the distortion through the years many times. Similar story to Paul Burlson on Train and Ike on Rocket 88 .
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  60
Total posts:  1854
Initial post:  May 26, 2011
Latest post:  16 days ago

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