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What artists would you select to convert someone to Country?


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Showing 1-25 of 57 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012 11:05:03 AM PST
Randy says:
RE: Corb Lund !!!
Dwight Yoakam
Steve Earle
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hey Peter; cool to see I'm not the only Corb Lund fan around here!

Posted on Nov 30, 2012 10:47:56 AM PST
brotagonist says:
Corb Lund !!!
Dwight Yoakam
Steve Earle

Posted on Nov 30, 2012 7:36:50 AM PST
vivazappa says:
How bout Skynyrd...post Ronnie!

Posted on Nov 30, 2012 7:21:33 AM PST
zlh67 says:
I agree that if someone does a like an entire genre country, introducing them to it is probably best done gradually, ie, with artists that have a country flavor to their stuff, but aren't necessarily just 100% country.

So assuming they liked rock and/or blues, I'd put them onto some early Eagles (country flavored rock) and Lucinda Williams (country mixed in with blues, rock, folk). And STEVE EARLE.

From there, give 'em the rest of the enchilada with classic country artists that (to me anyway) transcend the genre: Hank Williams Sr, Patsy Cline, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012 5:23:54 AM PST
Hinch says:
I saw Poco quite a few times in the 70s and 80s, including the '89 LEGEND reunion of the original members. What a great band! I haven't seen them since the reunion. I believe all the original members are still living.

Currently Rusty Young is the only one still with the band. He was always a highlight of the shows. He could rock the pedal steel! I've seen him play it with a metal folding chair.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012 5:13:43 AM PST
Hinch says:
>that is exactly the scenario I envision when I think of "converting" someone<

Good explanation! I can see your point. Thanks!!

There's always different ways of looking at things.

Posted on Nov 30, 2012 5:02:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 30, 2012 5:15:37 AM PST
Randy says:
RE: As a teen I automatically rejected anything country, only because I knew it was country and I liked rock. I first heard Hank Williams when I was 16. I was at the home of a friend of the family. They had a large collection of Hank Sr. Out of curiosity I played one of the records. It blew my mind, and I became a big fan of Hank Williams. I'm not sure I would define that as being "converted". It didn't mean I now liked everything country. I still liked rock, but my mind had now been opened and I realized there was other country music I liked, but had never been willing to admit, even to myself.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hinch, that is exactly the scenario I envision when I think of "converting" someone. If a person is truly open to new music and new experiences, the right artist at the right time could open him up to the fact that there are worlds of great music he hadn't considered. Those people are potential fans of (insert genre name here) if they could only hear a particular song or artist to grab their attention.

I agree that there are people who are so close-minded that they will not consider listening to anything other than what they already like. Those people you cannot change.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012 2:28:35 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 30, 2012 4:42:22 AM PST
Hinch says:
Michael

>Some people don't like country because they can't get past the posturing of the artist.<

That may be true of many people. I like a lot of country music, but there's also a lot I don't like. I think some other examples of "posturing" are Kenny Chesney and Garth Brooks, but I don't care for most of their music anyway. I've liked one song I can think of by KC, and several by GB. Same goes for Toby, so I can get past the posturing if I like a particular song but you do make a good point.

When I said "You really can't "convert" anyone. Some people like country, some don't.", I didn't express very well what I was trying to say.

I'm sure there are those who like country music and wouldn't give any other music a chance. Same with some who like rock, classical, jazz or any particular genre, and wouldn't think of listening to another genre enough to know whether they like it or not. Their minds are closed to any other. Those are who you can't convert.

I don't close my mind to any genre. There's something good in every genre if you give it a chance.

I'm sure if you can convince someone to listen to music they don't normally listen to, they may find some music they like. I don't think that would necessarily mean they were "converted".

As a teen I automatically rejected anything country, only because I knew it was country and I liked rock. I first heard Hank Williams when I was 16. I was at the home of a friend of the family. They had a large collection of Hank Sr. Out of curiosity I played one of the records. It blew my mind, and I became a big fan of Hank Williams. I'm not sure I would define that as being "converted". It didn't mean I now liked everything country. I still liked rock, but my mind had now been opened and I realized there was other country music I liked, but had never been willing to admit, even to myself.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 5:49:05 PM PST
I take exception to your comment. Some people don't like country because they can't get past the posturing of the artist. Many country artists distract from thje greatness of the music with their posturing. A dip into California country rock of the 60's will fix that problem. Merle Haggard, Gram Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers had a certain "let's get past the posturing and let the music speak for itself" attitude that was not so offensive as what became par for the course for modern country ( I'm thinking Toby Keith types).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 5:43:53 PM PST
I liked your post, but no mention of Poco. You might want to hear their first album, a 5-star record if there ever was one. Also John Stewart' "California Bloodlines" and/or his live album , "The Phoenix Concerts."
You seem to have really good taste so I heartily recommend both those artists knowing that you'll probably love them.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 4:57:56 PM PST
MyRidesHere says:
Johnny Cash
Dwight Yoakum
Merle Haggard
George Jones
Loretta Lynn
Tammy Wynette
Tom Russell
Buck Owens

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 12:41:05 PM PST
Randy says:
Old country or new country?

Old country:
Johnny Cash
Merle Haggard
Hank Williams
George Jones
Johnny Horton

New country:
Hayes Carll
Corb Lund
Todd Snider
Amanda Shires
Shovels & Rope

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 11:50:21 AM PST
Backwards-looking genres are doomed. Eventually there is nothing left for the public to "rediscover." Even the Beatles clone Oasis had to throw in Sex Pistols, Who, Zeppelin, Squeeze, etc. elements.

Country doesn't need another Willie Nelson. It needs a guy with everything you liked about Willie Nelson plus a couple of dozen musicians Willie might not have paid much attention to. I agree that might involve more instruments, effects, studio techniques, chord changes, and polyrhythms Willie didn't get around to. I haven't given up on country I think it just needs another 5 or 10 years to catch up. You can retain all the things you liked about the past with a few new surprises as well.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 11:23:08 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> It could be argued that you had been bored with acoustic "folk" until some of those electric bands got your ears used to it.

No, it's more like I didn't listen to folk at all. I wasn't "bored" with it; I hadn't heard any of it, period. *Now* I'm bored with it. Electrified folk-rock was a completely separate entity. I had never even thought of Simon & Garfunkel, early Aimee Mann or The Grapes of Wrath as "folk rock"; I'd simply thought of them as "pop".

> I don't think it can be said that the average country group is developing farther than their influences.

Blues, folk and country are very backwards-looking genres. Artists want to look to the past, not to the future. I wish we'd have more artists like Willie Nelson, whose country flavour was so deeply ingrained in him that he didn't feel the need to prove himself "country" by languishing in the same tired chords, arrangements and melodies all the time. Unfortunately, more country artists are concerned with trying to be "authentic" than trying to be innovative. Even something as simple as expanding their choice in instruments would do a great deal towards moving the genre forward.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 10:54:34 AM PST
D. Mok: It could be argued that you had been bored with acoustic "folk" until some of those electric bands got your ears used to it. I never would have given Bob Dylan's first albums a ghost of a chance until hearing "Slow Train Coming" and "Blonde on Blonde" a few dozen times. The disciples of punk rock made me go back and give the originators another chance. The jazz fusion guys made me go back and give acoustic jazz another chance.

Conversely, I don't think it can be said that the average country group is developing farther than their influences. In many cases, they are a step down. The country singers and musicians who have spent their entire lives listening to nothing but 100% country music have grown boring and stale. They have nowhere to go but repeat the same old same old.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 9:46:56 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 29, 2012 9:51:08 AM PST
<<<Not always. When I started listening to folk music in the '90s, I started with a pretty extreme sub-genre, British Isles folk.>>>
Ewan MacColl was the man.....

Ballads - Murder Intrigue Love Discord

these are a cappella recordings from the fifties. Before Baez and the like made those 'pretty,pretty' recordings.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 9:42:18 AM PST
D. Mok says:
> If someone is looking to investigate a genre, it's probably better to start with artists who include elements of several other genres.

Not always. When I started listening to folk music in the '90s, I started with a pretty extreme sub-genre, British Isles folk. After that, I went to the extremes of primitive country-blues-folk with the Anthology of American Folk Music. I'd listened to folk rock before that (The Byrds, The Grapes of Wrath, Toad the Wet Sprocket, R.E.M. etc.), but folk rock did *not* lead me to folk, simply because it wasn't "folk" to me; it was rock. So I'd had no reason to explore folk music because of it.

Different people need different kinds of ways to get into new tastes. Some need the "pure" version of that new taste. Others need it to be similar enough to familiar tastes to transition.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 8:44:09 AM PST
vivazappa says:
Hank Willians Sr.
Johnny Cash...early stuff.
John Hiatt's "Walk On"

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 8:07:06 AM PST
D. Mok: If someone is looking to investigate a genre, it's probably better to start with artists who include elements of several other genres. Labels like "electric folk" and "alternative pop" are useless when deciding if that artist is someone who you might grow to like or not.

Modern country, opera, gangsta rap, and death metal fans can be pretty narrow and rigid at times. There is often an unspoken rule that to be a serious fan one of those genres you must have a sneering and vocal contempt for all other genres. I look for artists who are bold enough and talented enough to "smuggle" new things in and break the rules while still earning the grudging respect of the purists. Country doesn't seem to have much of that now. They're all too busy buying 10 million copies of the latest Sugarland or Kenny Chesney trash.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 6:09:24 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 29, 2012 8:21:44 AM PST
Jacky

Sorry, I made a mistake - I was thinking about the song "Tear Stained Letter" which Johnny Cash wrote himself - I thought it was a cover - didn't realize there were two different songs. I don't know if Cash even made a cover of the Richard Thompson - I don't think so...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 5:15:27 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 29, 2012 5:15:36 AM PST
I thought about them for my list, too. Along with Wilco, The Jayhawks and Cross Canadian Ragweed but thought they were closer to rock. Ryan Adams could get in that group too probably.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 10:20:32 PM PST
B-Jak says:
I'm really surprised no one's said anything about Uncle Tupelo. They were the guys who got me to listen to country in the first place.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 8:20:54 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 8:26:40 PM PST
What kind of music would you call Led Zeppelin's 'Hot Dog'?
Country Western and/or Rockabilly?

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 8:13:08 PM PST
I prefer artists that play country, as well as many other things, by choice not because it's the only thing they know.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 8:09:31 PM PST
Just about anybody can be country in a given moment.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  28
Total posts:  57
Initial post:  Nov 27, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 30, 2012

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