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Columbia dropped Johnny Cash this day in 1986


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Showing 1-25 of 29 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 15, 2012 8:49:43 AM PDT
James Riley says:
After 28 years on the label, Columbia drops Johnny Cash this day in 1986. http://rockabillynblues.blogspot.com/2012/07/columbia-drops-johnny-cash-this-day-in.html
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Posted on Jul 15, 2012 2:55:11 PM PDT
And they've been repackaging and making even more money off him ever since the day he died. Major labels: total scum.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012 4:57:27 PM PDT
Did they break him?

Posted on Jul 15, 2012 5:52:25 PM PDT
tmoore says:
As I recall, a lot of people lost their major label contracts around that time. For example, Van Morrison was dropped by Warner Brothers in 1985. To me it represents a major sign of the transition between the era of the labels supporting artists (Warner Brothers was a great example of this) to them just caring about their bottom line - labels weren't the only ones guilty of this; radio station formats became much more restricted in this general timeframe also.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012 5:58:43 PM PDT
dallas says:
James Riley

Boy did they blow it bigtime when they drop him.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012 6:31:41 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Cash was a survivor, besides If Columbia hadnt dropped him, we may not have got all those great Rick Rubin produced recordings.

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 7:39:22 AM PST
Hinch says:
Johnny Cash was born 82 years ago today.

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 8:10:18 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on May 8, 2014 7:15:59 PM PDT]

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 8:29:23 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 26, 2014 8:51:53 AM PST
Hinch says:
Quite a few old country and folk songs were about murder. The Banks of The Ohio was one. Most expressed regret or ended with at least the person being caught. Johnny also has one about a man about to be hanged... 25 Minutes To Go.

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 9:31:49 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on May 8, 2014 7:16:05 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 26, 2014 9:33:25 AM PST
Hinch says:
That's true.

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 9:39:59 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on May 8, 2014 7:16:06 PM PDT]

Posted on Feb 26, 2014 9:43:22 AM PST
Better late than never..just got this set a few days ago

Walking The Line: The Legendary Sun Recordings (3CD)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 26, 2014 9:47:30 AM PST
Hinch says:
Yep! There were lots of great westerns. I own Wanted: Dead or Alive - The Complete Series - Special Edition. Have Gun Will Travel was a good one too. I did know Chuck played baseball. Last I heard, Johnny Crawford still fronts a big band group.

Posted on Feb 27, 2014 6:19:45 PM PST
If you all haven't watched "Sugarfoot" that is one you will enjoy a lot.
I'll throw down "Maverick" and "Laredo" as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 27, 2014 6:50:54 PM PST
Hinch says:
I remember Sugarfoot.

Posted on Feb 27, 2014 7:22:29 PM PST
Remember that J. Cash did his last recordings for American records.
Rick Rubin sold that label to Sony in the late 90s while Cash was alive and well and recording for it.

Sony acquired Columbia in the 80s..

So he was sort of back on the same label at the end of his life.

Posted on Feb 27, 2014 11:54:25 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 27, 2014 11:59:42 PM PST
Jevrick says:
Cash was considered an over the hill artist, and wasn't selling many records at the time so dropping him made good business sense. At the time it seemed a career resurrection was a long shot. His style was out of touch with the mid 80s country scene, where The Judds and Randy Travis ruled. How were they to foresee what would happen down the line in the late 90s with Rick Rubin? They couldn't. Labels don't always make the right decisions due to unforeseen factors.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 27, 2014 11:57:01 PM PST
Jevrick says:
Cash had a lot of sympathy for prisoners. Maybe a little too much. I'm thinking he forgot that some of those incarcerated men were right where they deserved to be.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2014 4:23:10 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 28, 2014 4:46:01 AM PST
Hinch says:
It was never about whether they "deserved" to be in prison. It was about rehabilitation as well as punishment, and after serving your time, being treated right and being given a chance, and not having it hanging over your head the rest of your life if you're trying to live right. He was somewhat disheartened and changed his views on prisoners later. I remember him saying for some, there was no chance of rehabilitation and it was a waste of time.

Posted on Feb 28, 2014 4:41:47 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 28, 2014 5:26:08 AM PST
Hinch says:
>How were they to foresee what would happen down the line in the late 90s with Rick Rubin? They couldn't. Labels don't always make the right decisions due to unforeseen factors<

Rick Rubin had been co-president of Columbia and a producer of rap, rock and metal. He formed Def Jam records as primarily a rap/hip-hop label.. When the word "def" became accepted by mainstream and he even found it in the dictionary, he had a funeral for the word "def" complete with a coffin and grave. It's the same thing the hippies in San Francisco did after advertisers and the music business commercialized "hippie". He changed Def Jam to American Records. Johnny Cash was his first major project. If Cash had stayed with Columbia, I doubt he would have used a rap producer, which is what Rubin was. There's an upcoming release of an album JC recorded for Columbia in 1980 but was never finished. His son recently finished it with the help of other musicians.

Out Among The Stars

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2014 3:42:13 PM PDT
Jevrick says:
So this album was recorded around the same time as Rockabilly Blues. If it's anywhere near as good as that one I'll have to check it out.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2014 3:48:40 PM PDT
Hinch says:
I'm looking forward to it. Yes, Rockabilly Blues is a good one. I hope this one is at least as good.

I've enjoyed his Bootleg Series too.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2014 6:38:59 PM PDT
Budas Root says:
That's what makes the Folsom album so great. He was so much on the side of the convicts. Try Cocaine Blues, I took a shot of cocaine and away I run, I shot my woman down. He wanted to give those men the gift of grace, of understanding. And they got to feel human for an hour. You begrudge them that hour?

Posted on Mar 11, 2014 6:46:33 PM PDT
I wouldn't begrudge them anything. Yes, they're in prison and probably belong there. But every moment of their life doesn't have to be lived in agony. They're human beings, a fact that Cash understood.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  29
Initial post:  Jul 15, 2012
Latest post:  Mar 12, 2014

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