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Beatles Experts: A Question


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Showing 1-16 of 16 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 14, 2012 9:48:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2012 9:51:06 AM PDT
Did the Beatles ever perform the music of a complete album in a live concert?

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 11:05:39 AM PDT
Short answer: no.

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 11:11:37 AM PDT
TC says:
nope

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 12:23:49 PM PDT
Severin says:
Their concerts didn't last long enough, only 20 minutes or so.

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 12:39:08 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2012 12:44:18 PM PDT
@Donald J.Nelson: most of their concerts from early '63 on lasted about 30 minutes. The only album I can think of that comes close to the original poster's question was the debut "Please Please Me", which was comprised *almost* entirely of songs they played in their Cavern Club days. But even then, they never played the album in order from start to finish or anything, those songs were usually mixed in with dozens of other songs they would play at random from night to night during the club years. Then by the time the debut came out and the group were touring behind it, their setlist was already becoming tightly controlled; the songs they played from it in the first half of '63 were "I Saw Her Standing There", "Ask Me Why", "Please Please Me", "Love Me Do", "PS I Love You" (sometimes), and "Twist And Shout". There were usually five or six cuts per album played on the tours for each new album up through "Help!", then only two songs played from "Rubber Soul" and (infamously) none played from "Revolver" even though the group was on a major world tour when the album was released. Then they of course quit touring after '66 so there were no tours for "Pepper", "Mystery Tour", The White Album or "Abbey Road".

The '69 rooftop show featured four of the songs that would make the "Let It Be" album, plus the b-side "Don't Let Me Down".

The idea of playing entire albums from start to finish didn't really take flight until the early 70s when prog bands like Jethro Tull and Pink Floyd started doing it, I think. Even then, not many bands did it. Nowadays some bands go back and revisit a classic LP from their past and play it from start to finish.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2012 12:51:05 PM PDT
Severin says:
At 30 minutes they would have had enough time to play one of their American albums but why would they? They hated what Capitol did to their thought-out track lineups.

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 12:57:29 PM PDT
@Donald J.Nelson: They would have had time to play one or two of the early UK albums as well, but it just wasn't the practice then. They usually had to play all their hit singles, which were never on the UK albums, and that took up almost half the setlist as it was. Fuggedabout the Capitol albums, LOL

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2012 5:33:22 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 14, 2012 5:34:15 PM PDT
Johnny Bee says:
Yeah - "The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl". The complete album was a live concert (2 actually)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2012 5:50:40 PM PDT
Dee Zee says:
Johnny Bee is the winner!

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 6:01:46 PM PDT
@Johnny Bee: um, I don't think that's what the OP meant...ah well clever enough, I suppose!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2012 6:05:59 PM PDT
Johnny Bee says:
Wasn't it Michael? ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 14, 2012 7:45:38 PM PDT
The album "The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl" was not a complete live concert. It was portions of two live concerts.

Posted on Sep 14, 2012 9:03:22 PM PDT
@BFD: that's right, it was the 64 and 65 shows mixed up. From the discussion on The Beatles forum it looks like even "Live At The Star Club" was edited from different nights...

It would be nice to have the entire Coliseum show, the entire Shea show, the entire 7/1 Budokan show and the entire rooftop show on CD.

Posted on Oct 6, 2012 12:37:57 PM PDT
A. Strong says:
The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl contained concerts performed there in 1964 and 1965 and it deserves a release on compact disc.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 4:29:41 PM PDT
Hinch says:
Besides that. HOLLYWOOD BOWL was a recording of a performance, not a performance of a recording.

Posted on Apr 30, 2013 4:51:35 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
If you mean performing one of their albums in its entirety live, no, they did not.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  10
Total posts:  16
Initial post:  Sep 14, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 30, 2013

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