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Keith Moon vs. Rick Buckler?


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Showing 26-50 of 92 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 11:59:40 AM PDT
zlh67 says:
And of course, at least 1 car in the pool!

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 12:01:50 PM PDT
vivazappa says:
D@mn straight!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 12:03:54 PM PDT
"BOOOOM" There goes another toilet as our dear boy has some cherry bombs!

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 1:04:17 PM PDT
S. Stalcup says:
Don't forget to steal that bottle of gin from the next room for Graham Chapman.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 1:12:31 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 1:18:35 PM PDT
bass boy says:
The Jam are amazing! As a drummer, Rick wasn't incredibly showy, but he was right for The Jam, especially live. Keith Moon, however, was a more exciting, better drummer. But I do love The Jam A LOT! I finally picked up the quasi-boot DVD of "Trans Global Express," The Jam's farewell 1982 gig. Too bad the DVD is only 30 minutes long. We need a full-length DVD release of that show. Also, any Jam fan needs "The Complete Jam," a wonderful 2-DVD set packed with tons of footage. Great, great stuff. They're in my Top 10, easily.

P.S. It's nice to see a mention of Blondie's Clem Burke. Don't snicker, Clem was/is amazing on the drums. I always thought that Clem Burke on drums and The Jam's Bruce Foxton on bass would be a completely unstoppable rhythm section back in both bands' prime era. Foxton/Burke would topple the rhythm sections of The (great) Clash, The Ramones, Sex Pistols, etc. in about four beats. And Burke, back in 1978/1979, could have replaced Moon in The Who. He wasn't/isn't quite as an astonishing drummer as prime Moonie, but he was very strong. Check out the old live clips of Blondie/Burke back in the 1970s and early 1980s on Youtube, particularly "Dreaming." :)

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 1:47:52 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 11:29:56 AM PDT
When Keith Moon passed away in 1978 one of the rock magazines (Creem or Circus) mentioned Clem Burke's reaction to hearing of Keith's death by destroying his drumkit at a gig and screaming: "That was for Keith Moon the greatest drummer that ever lived!" Clem was a major fan of Moonie and whatta drummer!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 2:22:05 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 2:23:28 PM PDT
D. Sippel says:
The Jam are one of my faves as well. I didn't care for them much in their heyday, but got hooked well after the fact and immersed myself in their box set Direction Reaction Creation. They were impressively consistent qualitywise throughout their career. I've also been mildly following Paul Weller's solo career. It's not The Jam, but his new record rocks well for a geezer: Sonik Kicks.

But back on topic: Moon #1 Buckler #2 (with Clem Burke tied for second)

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 3:09:14 PM PDT
S. Stalcup says:
Man, I can't believe how this thing has come roaring back to life after last Fall.

What a weird world. Nice sometimes though.

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 3:10:52 PM PDT
S. ~

That's why I went looking for it....
This thread has life still!

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 4:12:25 PM PDT
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Posted on Apr 20, 2012 7:28:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 7:31:54 PM PDT
bass boy says:
With all due respect, Simon Phillips was a fine fit for The Who in 1989, but Zak Starkey was/is an even better fit for The Who. If you listen to Keith Moon on the 1971 live bonus disc of the Deluxe Version of "Who's Next" from 2003, or watch his performance at the London Coliseum gig in 1969 (or even Cleveland 1975), Moon was not a sloppy joker on the drums, but a terrific drummer. Was he technical like Bill Bruford? No. But he was perfect for The Who, and his drumming on "Who's Next" is much more pioneering, stronger and inspired than many people care to admit these days. Phillips is a great musician, too, although I thought his playing was just a little bit too clean for The Who in 1989. Don't get me wrong, I'm one of the few Who fans who doesn't hate the 1989 tour, video and accompanying "Join Together (live)" album - that 1989 DVD has THE BEST live version of Townshend's solo "Rough Boys" ever. It's just I prefer Zak's (and Keith's) playing. Phillips is a great technician, but Moonie played like his life depended on every cymbal hit and snare shot, and I love that. The people who call Moon such a sloppy drummer, I just want them to play the drum parts to "Bargain" for me. Lol! :)

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 7:31:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 7:36:28 PM PDT
Thank you again, Bass Boy!
Some of us out here still think Keith Moon was pretty darn great!
Zak, the student of a certain Keith Moon is a great drummer as well....

WOOF EDIT: My best Who show was my first...San Francisco Civic Auditorium in December 1971 and Moon was playing like three drummers that night...Sloppy he WAS NOT!

Posted on Apr 21, 2012 12:09:16 AM PDT
Jim Dautry says:
Keith Moon was great but so was Ginger Baker (Cream & Ginger Baker's Air Force) and Gene Krupa

Posted on Apr 21, 2012 12:11:26 AM PDT
Jim Dautry says:
My favorite Keith Moon effort was "Underture" from the GREAT rock opera "Tommy"

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 1:04:04 AM PDT
I didn't say I didn't like him, in the studio he was fine. Any live stuff I've seen hasn't impressed me much.

Bass boy I liked that 89 show and DVD as well. Actually that is when I thought they played good live.
I thought the Stones were sloppy live in the mid 70's as well. Then by Steel Wheels they started putting together much better shows. Of course '69 and '72 were pretty awesome.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 1:05:03 AM PDT
Jim, ask Ginger what he thinks of Keith.....

Posted on Apr 21, 2012 4:23:35 PM PDT
wobberoo says:
I'd rather watch Keith Moon,instead of Rick Buckler,because he was also one funny guy.It's right though that Zak Starkey is very good,and if he hadn't been in such a no win situation,people would rate him much more.

Posted on Apr 21, 2012 5:53:00 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 21, 2012 5:54:27 PM PDT
I just played my old cassette tape of: "In The City" by The Jam and I must say this old tape sounds dang good.
Highlights (for me) were: "I've Changed My Address" and "Away From The Numbers" the drumming is quite fine on this one! It's a good power pop record from this trio.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 9:14:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 9:17:43 AM PDT
Dee Zee says:
I saw the 1969 Stones, great show, very tight with a bit of sloppy.

Don't have any Jam, what CD should I start with?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 9:53:37 AM PDT
S. Stalcup says:
For an overview, I'd go with Compact Snap!, Dee Zee. Then when you determine which period you like best, you can go into specific albums. They altered over their short life extremely. It boggles the minds of some that the same band who did "This is the Modern World" also did a letter perfect version of Curtis Mayfield's "Move On Up."

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 6:39:56 AM PDT
vivazappa says:
Bass Boy:
Right on about Zak!

About 89...I liked what I heard...loved the setlist but...(there's always a but)
At the massive LA Colusium we thought we had great seats close on the side except...(there's always an except)
A friggin' Miller Beer sign blocked PETE all night!!!
Harumph!!!

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 11:22:45 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 11:27:42 AM PDT
The Who "Big-Band" tour of 1989. For those of you the ride the: "Simon Phillips is the only drummer for The Who bandwagon" you may not have known there was a lady percussionist helping Simon get a larger drum sound to re-create Keith Moon's parts. Zak, plays alone and does quite well. Pete Townshend, was quoted during the Roger vs. Pete feud of 1975: "Sack Keith? Yeah, great and then I gotta find three drummers to replace him!"

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 11:42:51 AM PDT
onsenkuma says:
@S.Stalcup,
You couldn't be more right about this recommendation! Even for those who already have every authorized note The Jam released, 'Snap!' has always been a solid listen...

@Dee Zee,
If you're interested then you might want to check out Hip-O Select's deluxe version of 'Snap!', which includes all 29 tracks + the limited edition 4 track live ep that came with the original 1983 UK pressings of the vinyl version. The only CD version that's even classier is the OOP Japanese mini lp version, if you can find it on eBay...

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 11:46:13 AM PDT
vivazappa says:
Wolf:

Really percussion? She must have been behind the beer sign too!

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 11:52:06 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 11:54:29 AM PDT
Viva Z ~

The girl (Jody somebody) was from Pete's touring band and they gave here some mallets and a sparkly dress and she pounded on things like Ray Cooper would do in Elton's onstage band. I attended Toronto, New York City and Foxboro Stadium on the 1989 tour and there was about 19 people on that Miller Beer (Sure, Entwistle BATHED in that junk!) stage. Pete, was interviewed in Rolling Boulder magazine and he said the beer company payed for the jet and he was gettin' tired of sitting in coach!
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  92
Initial post:  Oct 9, 2011
Latest post:  May 1, 2012

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