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Why The Buffalo Springfield Might Be The Most Important Band Of All Time (And Certainly More Important Than The Kinks !)


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Posted on Apr 27, 2012 5:31:41 PM PDT
Michael Nesmith did some countryish stuff in the Monkees, but his First National Band did not put out a record until early 1970, I think, which was after "Sweetheart of the Rodeo". Was he doing some stuff before this that was underneath the radar but influential all the same? Maybe. "What Am I Doing Hanging 'Round?" was 1967. I'd take that recording over anything the Eagles put out.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2012 5:40:01 PM PDT
stevign says:
Get with the program Steven, he's now known as "Vertically Challenged Tim".

Posted on Apr 27, 2012 5:40:29 PM PDT
You are correct as "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" was released by The Byrds in 1968. Michael Nesmith and The First National Band released three records in the early seventies.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2012 6:14:55 PM PDT
stevign says:
I really dig a lot of Nesmith's solo work, the guy has wit, talent and excellent writing skills.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2012 7:38:48 PM PDT
Dee Zee says:
I'm not joking, weren't Tiny Tim and Dylan roommates at one time in the early 60s?

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 1:33:23 AM PDT
W.David English sez: "What Am I Doing Hanging 'Round?" was 1967. I'd take that recording over anything the Eagles put out.

Totally 100% agreed!!!

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 6:36:35 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 28, 2012 6:36:56 AM PDT
tmoore says:
I've heard a couple Nesmith solo tracks on radio shows like "The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn" and possibly "Weasel's Wild Weekend" (the latter is a local radio show in Baltimore). I've liked all of them.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 6:45:38 AM PDT
Dee Zee,
I don't know if they were roommates, but they definately were friends in Grenwich Village.
JC

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 6:57:10 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 28, 2012 6:58:54 AM PDT
As far as the original five man Byrds line-up, I would say the only songwriter Crosby was better than was Michael Clarke. Crosby couldn't hold a candle compared to Gene and Roger, and by the time of YTY Chris Hillman had passed him up.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 7:15:37 AM PDT
you're such a loon~this discussion is pointless~how could you mention boring crap like Jim Messina and Souther-Furay in the same breath as the Kinks. Don't get me wrong, i like the Buffalo Springfield and some of the offshoots you've mentioned, however, the Kinks existed as a band until the mid nineties when they release 'To The Bone' (which is excellent) Buffalo Springfield imploded in like three years or less/ Can you say "Sacred Cow"?

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 7:25:33 AM PDT
Didn't Buffalo Springfield begat....Rick Springfield?

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 7:58:49 AM PDT
Ivan says:
The question is which band was most important so first we need to define what we mean by important. A few definitions "of much or great significance or consequence" "of considerable influence" are both in my dictionary. Not to discount the Kink's music but I am not sure what if any influence the Kinks had on pop music while as others have mentioned the influence of BS is huge.

Having said that, I want to mention another obscure group that had a very big impact on American music - the Paul Butterfield Blues band -as embodied by "East West" - it's early incarnation with two guitars , two drummers and an organ preeceded both the Dead and the Allman Brothers and it can be argued that the whole San Francisco music scene with lengthy jams as well as the integration of blues into American Rock and Roll began with the PBBB. Furthermore when a later version of the BBB added horns it preceded Blood Sweat and Tears and the American Flag.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 8:02:47 AM PDT
Ivan says:
Not so much the Byrd's as Gram Parsons when he did that one great album with the Byrds "Sweet Heart of the Rodeo" before he left and started the Burritos. Love the Byrd's but the whole reason Sweetheart happened is the Byrds lacked a vision and this brash kid took over for one album.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 8:10:42 AM PDT
Dee Zee says:
Gram didn't start the Burritos. Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons founded the Flying Burrito brothers.

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 8:24:19 AM PDT
Sneaky Pete vs. Rusty Young.....Who's got the twang?

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 9:57:33 AM PDT
Ivan,

Re " I am not sure what if any influence the Kinks had on pop music while as others have mentioned the influence of BS is huge. "

Rich Irony !

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 10:10:52 AM PDT
MC says:
The Butterfield blues Band did not have two drummers, at least when bloomfield and bishop were playing guitar

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 11:05:06 AM PDT
MiBoDoCa says:
You don't know what influence of The Kinks was on pop music but some other people may:

Quotes

The Kinks influence is seen across a wide range of rock from acts like The Who, Bruce Springsteen, The Jam, The Pretenders, Tom Petty, XTC and Elvis Costello - whom have all paid homage to the Kinks at some point in covers or accolades.

The Kinks helped kick off a power pop movement in the US led by bands like Big Star and the Knack and were seen as the primary influence on heavy metal with bands like Van Halen, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath and Metallica covering them or citing them as the reason why they formed a band. Their later influence was cited by the Britpop groups such as Oasis, Blur and Pulp and can be seen today in bands like the Kooks, Wilco, Yo La Tengo and Spoon whom have all covered them.

Pete Townshend

Pete Townshend, guitarist with The Kinks' contemporaries The Who, was particularly influenced by the group's sound: "Dave was a real innovator and Ray was a gobsmaking genius...I hope desperatly they work together again"

Paloma Faith

"Working with Ray taught me that being fresh is not about being current. The kinks are too cool for school, even today. This is why all the new young bands admire and respect them."

Metallica

(on working with Ray for his 2010 album `See My Friends') "We had a blast hanging out with a real legend..."

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Website

"Ray Davies is almost indisputably rock's most literate, witty and insightful songwriter."

Dave Davies

"Working with the Kinks, there always seemed to be some kind of automatic process at work. Ray and I had this telepathy happening for a long time, where one of us always knew what the other could do with something."

Amy Macdonald

"I've just recorded an amazing track with Ray Davies from The Kinks. He is one of the most powerful songwriters there's ever been and has had so many hits, so to work with him was amazing for me. I'd be hard-pressed to beat that."

Paul Weller

"One of the greatest groups of the 60s and Ray Davies is an unparalleled genius of a writer. No one else could match their changes and they remain such a massive influence on me. They are a constant in my life and work."

Little Steven from the E Street Band

"Their first three singles completely killed me"

Marky Ramone

"You Really Got Me, that was to me the first punk rock guitar sound"

Ozzy Osbourne

"I played it, played it and played it (You Really Got Me) I couldn't stop playing it"

Iggy Pop

"The Kinks came out when I was in high school, I just went crazy"

Graham Nash (Hollies, CSNY)

"They are everything rock and roll should be"

David Coverdale (Deep Purple/Whitesnake)

"The Kinks I still love to this day, it's great rock and roll - a great British band"

Damon Albarn (Blur/Gorillaz)

"I thought the songs were fantastic...the Stones were pornographic and The Kinks were geographic"

Suggs (Madness)

"If you have any real passion for British pop music you can't not have been influenced by the Kinks"

Alex Kapranos (Franz Ferdinand)

"The Kinks have to be right up there at the top"

Neko Case

"Ray Davies has this amazing quality that Roger Miller and Carolyn Mark have, where the song is sad and moving along and killing you. Then they say something that sounds like it should be almost comic-like "she ran around the house with her curlers on" and it sends you over the edge and breaks your heart. It feels so good and so humbling"

Black Francis [The Pixies]

"I've never copied Ray Davies or the Kinks, but time and time again I hear back one of my own songs and I do declare, hot damn, there it is AGAIN, the unmistakable imprint of Kinks; the result of having listened to The Kinks Kronikles on a daily basis from about age 14 to age 18. There are more fabulous songs not included on that precious compilation, but those 28 songs are thumping away gently in my soft brain forever. They will never go away. I am a proud servant of them."

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 3:12:29 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 28, 2012 3:13:28 PM PDT
@Ivan: OK disregarding your statement about The Kinks' influence (that was a joke, right? if not, you clearly didn't read any of the back posts in this thread, although MiBoDoCa was kind enough to try and get you up to speed), you also make the statement that The Byrds "lacked a vision" before Gram parsons took over for "Sweetheart". This is also completely incorrect--in fact, Roger McGuinn's planned followup to "Notorious" was supposed to be a highly ambitious double album charting the history of American music, no less, from its roots in bluegrass, blues, and country all the way to electronic music. After Gram joined, the second half of the planned album was scrapped and only the bluegrass/country part remained. So, if anything, Parsons actually limited the original vision for the album!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 4:44:43 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 28, 2012 4:49:41 PM PDT
stevign says:
re: "however the Kinks existed as a band until the mid nineties when they release 'To The Bone' (which is excellent) Buffalo Springfield imploded in like three years"

What does last-ability have to do with talent? Madonna has been around for decades, as well as John Tesh, Kenny G, Yanni, Snoop Dog, P. Diddy and until his death, Michael Jackson.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 4:45:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 28, 2012 4:50:05 PM PDT
stevign says:
No but they named the town in The Simpsons, "Springfield".

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 4:53:49 PM PDT
stevign says:
re: "Gram didn't start the Burritos"

Before the Spanish colonization of the Americas, indigenous peoples were eating hand-held snack foods like corn on the cob, popcorn and pemmican. In Mexico, the Spanish observed Aztecs selling take-out foods like tamales, tortillas, and sauces in open marketplaces. The Pueblo people of the desert Southwest also made tortillas with beans and meat sauce fillings prepared much like the modern burrito we know today.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 5:21:50 PM PDT
Dee Zee says:
but did the burritos fly?

Posted on Apr 28, 2012 5:44:28 PM PDT
@stevign, Dee Zee: ROTFL You sillies!!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2012 5:59:24 PM PDT
stevign says:
Thanks, I like to stay well informed.

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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  86
Total posts:  566
Initial post:  Apr 19, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 9, 2012

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