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Just Music....Period


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Initial post: Jan 20, 2010 6:28:14 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Aug 3, 2010 10:56:07 AM PDT
Butterfly says:
Just a nice, warm and friendly environment to talk about all things music.

No cliques, no drama. No era or genre restrictions here.

There are many fine topical discussion threads on this forum, if you can't find your brand of tea then *this* is the place around the corner at the next bus stop that you've been looking for. :-)

Welcome!

AP aka Althea

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 6:37:40 AM PST
I have yet to see a soft rock/adult contemporary thread.
This is the genre that sells millions...but no one will admit to buying.
The genre that has fans...but no one will admit to it.
They have great voices, superb songwriting and fantastic arrangements...so who's willing to fess up and admit besides me?
I know I can't be the only James Taylor, Paul Simon or Billy Joel fan on here!!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 6:52:24 AM PST
Butterfly says:
Hi Harold,

I'm fessing up and proud to do it! I listen to it all and it's for my own enjoyment.

One of my absolute favorite James Taylor songs is "Sunny Skies". Love Billy Joel, excellent pianist, singer, writer.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 6:52:49 AM PST
"I know I can't be the only James Taylor, Paul Simon or Billy Joel fan on here!!!!"

I like Paul Simon but not enough to own any of his albums, other than some hits collection that I rarely play. Being from Long Island Billy Joel has been shoved down my throat since I was kid and James Taylor? I find him utterly boring!

That being said, I do love me some soft rock every now and then but don't own very much of it. I usually find the soft rock satellite radio station when I'm in the mood. If you're familiar with the Time Life Soft Rock collection that is pretty typical of what they play. I have no problems 'fessing up' about my likes and dislikes although many people on these forums do. We like what we like and we are the only ones who need to live with ourselves.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 7:01:35 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 20, 2010 7:04:04 AM PST
Butterfly says:
Hi Christopher,

re: We like what we like and we are the only ones who need to live with ourselves.

Ab-so-lute-ly! I buy, listen to what *I* like, it doesn't matter to me what anyone thinks about it.

I like some Barry Manilow, even Kenny G but I also like Keith Urban, Led Zeppelin, Coldplay, Smokey Robinson, Mozart, Dvorak, Charles Mingus, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Astrud Gilberto, Tahiti 80, Pizzicato Five, Marlena Shaw and the list goes on, I add to it daily.

AP

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 7:11:00 AM PST
Barry Manilow..and Neil Diamond are a few guilty faves of mine. Growing up my mom was a big fan of both and some of those songs stuck. 'Mandy' always kills me..lol..

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 7:46:26 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 1, 2011 1:37:26 PM PDT]

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 8:27:51 AM PST
Music Lover says:
i will proudly say that i own James Taylor's 2 CD Best Of as well as October Road. i own every Billy Joel CD and nearly all of Paul Simon's recorded output. some other soft rockers i like though mostly through greatest hits packages are:
Jackson Browne
Neil Diamond
The Bee Gees
Aimee Mann
America
Bread
George Benson
Hall & Oates
Little River Band
Stephen Bishop
Phil Collins solo
Gladys Knight & The Pips

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 8:34:43 AM PST
Butterfly says:
Hi Will,

Thank you, I will check these out when I get home from work this evening. I love new recommendations!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 9:08:54 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 20, 2010 3:21:03 PM PST
Butterfly says:
Hi Music Lover,

I just listened to "Main Course" by the Bee Gees and boy am I impressed with the major role the drums play on their fast tempo songs and the slower ones as well.

Love America, especially "Hat Trick" I believe it was released in 1973, I will double check later.

Have you checked out Daryl Hall's fantastic website " Live From Daryl's House" where he jams with various artists? I'm telling you, you're gonna get hooked. I already have my own special room, I'm there so often. ;-)
Here's the link.

http://www.livefromdarylshouse.com/

"Hat Trick" product link:

Hat Trick

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 9:19:41 AM PST
Butterfly says:
Getting busy here in the office, I will chime in later to elaborate on some of the artists mentioned today and with more recommendations etc.....:-)

BBL,
AP

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 9:20:06 AM PST
"I just listened to "Main Course" by the Bee Gees and boy am I impressed with the major role the drums play on their fast tempo songs and the slower ones to as well."

It's amazing how great a REAL drummer can sound compared to the stale sounds of the computerized beats of today.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 9:27:26 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 20, 2010 9:30:01 AM PST]

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 9:28:29 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 20, 2010 9:29:41 AM PST
Butterfly says:
ADDENDUM:

Link for Bee Gees "Main Course"

Main Course

You can use this link for the MP3 album, which is more reasonably priced, if interested.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 9:38:27 AM PST
Music Lover says:
A.P-agreed on Main Course-possibly the best Bee Gees record ever and Edge Of the Universe is a hidden gem. i love their early stuff too but Nights On Broadway is astounding! the rhythm section cooks on that record. and i agree with Mr.Gazzo that there is no substitute for a real drummer.
thanks for the link i will check that out. Daryl Hall has one of the best voices ever IMO. though it's odd-i've often wondered what exactly Oates' role is(i know he sings lead on 1 to 2 songs per album and i like a few of his tunes but..) as Hall seems to be the star with the better voice. Yet i must admit something is missing for me with Hall's solo work, i just don't like it as much as H & O together. maybe Oates as the silent partner contributes more than we know

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 10:15:03 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 21, 2010 5:12:45 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 10:19:13 AM PST
As much as I love synth music, there's usually no substitute for real drums. I mean, listen to Gary Numan's "Pleasure Principle" and try to tell me a track like "Films" sounds anywhere CLOSE to as good if it had a drum machine. People forget that the only part of the traditional "band" he dropped for that album was the guitar. There's loads of real drum, bass (and viola) to be had there.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 10:31:59 AM PST
I'm from the school that music should be 'felt' no matter what style it is. As far as I know, machines can be programmed to make a sound but not emotion. It makes a big difference.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 10:40:33 AM PST
Snoo says:
Definately appreciate the softer side sometimes. The best of the best for me is Dan Fogelberg. Mostly his older material (Innocent Age and prior) is what I listen to. One of the best singer/songwriters ever.
Jackson Browne, America, Billy Joel etc..........all great artists and a necessity in my collection

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 10:44:14 AM PST
Robyn Hitchcock listens to the Higsons.
And that's real cool-

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 10:54:22 AM PST
Then I don't know how I can explain that nothing makes my spine tingle like the extended synth notes on Pleasure Principle. The difference between drum machines and drums is one thing... what else sounds like a Moog? "Synthesizer" is a terrible name for the instrument... it's the only way to make those sound, so what is it synthesizing?

As far as I know, only the listener feels emotions... the instruments themselves don't make them. Is an electric guitar not a machine too? It doesn't sound like much of anything unless you plug it in... ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 11:36:22 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 20, 2010 11:39:12 AM PST
I was referring to drums, not synths. Synths can produce a multitude of sounds that can add to the atmosphere of a recording.

"As far as I know, only the listener feels emotions... the instruments themselves don't make them."

No, but it certainly depends on the person using them..and the person playing the instrument is highly capable of showing a wide array of emotions through his/her instrument, very much like singing. You take away the human element, you take away emotionally charged music, IMO. Many of the best drumming parts in songs, if you have read stories on them, came almost by accident. I recall one story from Mountain drummer Corky Laing:

"Leslie (West) and I were stumbling through time changes and some very exotic chord patterns. It was becoming very tedious and I was pissed because the whole musical situation was over my head. The anxiety was blinding. When it came time to play the middle part I went crazy. I went f'ing bonkers and broke out in this aggressive snare pattern and out of complete frustration smashed every accent on every chord change with a fierce bash on every crash cymbal I could reach. I had exhausted every fiber of frustration in my body and was totally convinced I'd be replaced as the drummer for Mountain. Felix (Pappalardi) stopped everything - silence prevailed and he slowly shuffled up to me staring right through my tearful eyes. "You m-f-er," he said. "That was f'ing brilliant!!"

Try to program that. It could be drums, guitar or whatever..That's what I'm talking about.

Posted on Jan 20, 2010 11:55:08 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 20, 2010 11:59:52 AM PST
Tuco says:
An artist who I dont hear mentioned alot in music circles who has garnered much appreciation over the years from some of the best known names in the business is the late great Ronnie Lane.

Sure he was a hitmaker in Small Faces, and again with The Faces, but I find his best work to be his four solo albums after The Faces split. Just so pure and honest and organic with the fine muscianship of Slim Chance band backing him up. And the whole story of 'The Passing Show', his traveling gypsy circus show designed to bring music to people who might not normally be exposed to a live show, is really a great example of a man who tried to live his own truth. So sad he's not still around.

Alot of his music was recorded outdoors on the hillside on his sprawling english farm. Led Zeppelin recorded Physical Graffiti in his mobile studio and Clapton, Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood and Jimmy Page all paid his medical expenses towards the end when he ws really getting bad with MS.

I think most music lovers are familiar with his song Ooh La La, but alot of them are under the impression that is a Rod Stewart song. The album version was sung by Ronnie Wood (with Lane on backing in places) cuz Stewart didn't show up for the sessions. Stewart sung the song for the first time in his life when re-recorded it as a tribute to Ronnie Lane after his death in 1997. My point is ALL of Ronnie's work was of the same caliber and substance that made Ooh La La a hit but seems to be very little talked about.

I wanted to take the opportunity to encourage fans of acoustic, folk, and great songwriting/excellent muscianship to explore his solo albums. It's all real high quality stuff and just reeks of truth and love....

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 12:06:24 PM PST
Tuco says:
Just saw America on their last tour. What a great set!! Really wish they'd let Dan Peek back in the band. I know he's asked several times and the guys have sung backup on a cupla Peek's solo albums. His solo stuff was still high quality but with mainly Christian lyrics. It really hurt to see them in concert singing Peek's songs knowing he is still alive out there somewhere...

Maybe they're holdin out for the reunion as a cash cow, I don't know, but it would be a great step up for them and a gift for the fans. Maybe they could put out a good strong reunion album with Peeks contributing again. Fingers crossed...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2010 12:38:16 PM PST
re: Corky Laing
That's an awesome story. Some great things happen by accident. Numan's "Are Friends Electric?" for example was borne out of his frustration that two songs he was writing just weren't finishing... story goes he accidentally started playing them together and suddenly it worked!

Depeche Mode's "Never Let Me Down Again" starts off with the guitar riff it does because of a programming glitch (or operator error) that moved the riff to the beginning. Everybody instantly knew it was a happy accident. Somehow that isn't as cool a story as a drummer going ballistic though... your point is taken well.

I figured you were referring to drums and not synths... but wasn't absolutely sure. I've just been getting a little touchy I guess because I've run into a "synths aren't instruments" prejudice on this forum that I honestly haven't heard in 15+ years.

I guess I was splitting hairs about the "emotion from instruments"... I agree completely. A synth programmer, even if they don't play live, is still capable of putting their emotion into a composition and making the listener feel it. Think of them in the way you do a composer or a writer. They make their statement, and it is up to the listener whether they connect emotionally. Often times, it can be as emotionally resonant as other music.

Is it the same as sitting 10 feet from someone as they pour their heart, soul, and talent into an acoustic guitar performance - not really. I think it's hearing, seeing, and feeling the music live that takes it up that extra notch... and that's the biggest handicap synth music has IMO.
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Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  176
Total posts:  5546
Initial post:  Jan 20, 2010
Latest post:  Aug 3, 2013

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