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Spoken Word and Music


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Showing 1-21 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 18, 2012 3:44:22 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2012 7:15:57 AM PST
mac says:
Spoken word accompanied with music or overlayed with it is a genre worth exploring, don't you think? I know a lot of it is risqué or political and perhaps steeped in social comment and therefore difficult to converse about in these forums, but we could try.

Posted on Feb 18, 2012 4:13:55 PM PST
Anybody heard anything from Gil Scott-Heron? The Revolution Will Not Be Televised and No Knock are a few great classics. He had no idea at the time how much his music would influence others. R.I.P.

Posted on Feb 19, 2012 6:39:10 AM PST
KBIC says:
heard of rap?

Posted on Feb 19, 2012 8:16:39 PM PST
alysha25 says:
William Shatner, but it's comedy!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2012 10:04:51 PM PST
Jojo Lawren says:
Arlo Guthrie Alice's Restaurant!

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 6:49:08 AM PST
mac says:
"Words of Advice" by William S. Burroughs and set to music by Bill Laswell's Material creates an interesting vibe.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2012 6:50:46 AM PST
mac says:
"Alice's Restaurant" is an all-time classic of the genre!

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 7:07:49 AM PST
B L T says:
Jethro Tull - "The Story of the Hare Who Lost His Spectacles"

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 9:10:12 AM PST
W.H. says:
After The Ceasefire (Marianne Faithfull)

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 2:04:29 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2012 2:04:56 PM PST
Gena Chereck says:
The Rugburns, "Dick's Automotive"
"Weird Al" Yankovic, "Albuquerque"

Each has its singer spinning an increasingly bizarre tale with hysterical delivery over a high-energy rock track. (Also, both have sung choruses.)

And Tom Waits has done some spoken-word pieces with atmospheric musical backing:
"Frank's Wild Years" (from 'Swordfishtrombones')
"Shore Leave" (from 'Swordfishtrombones' -- includes sung choruses)
"The Ocean Doesn't Want Me" (from 'Bone Machine')
"What's He Building?" (from 'Mule Variations')
"Circus" (from 'Real Gone')
Plus the 'B@stards' disc from 'Orphans' has at least a few...

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 2:26:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2012 2:35:24 PM PST
Country artist Red Sovine has to be the King of "Spoken Word" songs. For starters, check out the trucker classics "Teddy Bear" and "Phantom 309." Then again, C.W. McCall did some talking in his CB/trucker ode, "Convoy," as well.

Plus, in 1978, the surviving Doors added musical backing to tapes of Jim Morrison reading his own poetry. The final results were released on the LP, "An American Prayer."

Lastly, check out 1981's "Stop and Take the Time to Smell the Roses" by Ringo Starr (from "Stop and Smell the Roses"). It's a bit of a novelty, but certainly fits the "Spoken Word" genre.

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 3:52:20 PM PST
Chazzzbo says:
Best Of Word Jazz like this?

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 3:59:26 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2012 4:07:42 PM PST
The Day We Fall in Love - The Monkees (from 1967's "More of the Monkees")

Plus. . .

You Can Be Anyone This Time Around - Dr. Timothy Leary (1970)

The Leary LP features Stephen Stills (guitar), John Sebastian (guitar), Jimi Hendrix (bass) and Buddy Miles (drums). Leary raps/philosophizes over the backing tracks.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2012 4:07:56 PM PST
mac says:
Chazzzbo - Ken Nordine (from the mini sound bites) requires a purchase! Is it a beatnik era recording?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2012 4:13:13 PM PST
mac says:
John C. Harrison - What a trip! Thank you for that! [You Can Be Anyone This Time Around - Dr. Timothy Leary (1970)].

I feel like I've had my head in a hole, as I hadn't heard of this one before.

Posted on Feb 20, 2012 4:42:53 PM PST
Chazzzbo says:
Mac - I believe Nordine's era of highest renown was the late 50's /early 60s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Nordine

all the best...

Posted on Feb 21, 2012 3:18:21 AM PST
Digable Planets - La Femme Fatale (1994), one of the greatest hip hop groups ever drop a classic, once I found out what the subject actually was it blew my mind. I'd say if you after some nice Spoken word or Deep Poetry Hip Hop check out Digable Planets or Arrested Development. Peace

Posted on Feb 21, 2012 9:48:42 AM PST
vivazappa says:
The Doors-American Prayer
Excellent blend of their music (Riders, Roadhouse ect...) and Jamas Douglas Morrison at his spoken word best!

Posted on Nov 2, 2012 3:26:14 PM PDT
The Moody Blues had a few spoken word passages on their albums and at the time 1967-1972 this was considered very far out!

Posted on Nov 2, 2012 4:40:25 PM PDT
De La Soul "3 Feet High and Rising" (1989)

Wyclef Jean "Carnival" (1997)

These albums are both worth owning...very original ideas despite the fact that they sample.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2012 5:14:07 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Nov 4, 2012 6:03:46 PM PST
Revue says:
Mac: I'm actually working on a musical experiment in this genre. I'm willing to send you guys the link if you're interested.
Edit:

http://soundcloud.com/revue-1
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Music forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  21
Initial post:  Feb 18, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 2, 2012

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