Customer Discussions > Mystery forum

What's your favorite all-time favorite mystery book


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 101-125 of 508 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on May 29, 2009 1:20:10 PM PDT
janebbooks says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2009 10:49:47 AM PDT
I really appreciate all the recommendations of you folks in the mystery community. I read your comments and make lists of books to check out on Amazon for availability for reading on my Kindle 2. But, it gets pretty old when time and time again the entire list IS NOT AVAILABLE to read on Kindle Discouraging. Come on Amazon work harder on getting all these books on Kindle.

Posted on Jun 6, 2009 7:10:03 PM PDT
Cassie Mae says:
Hey there

My all time favorite book is new author Kimberly Bridges. She has written Death Equity and I hope it becomes a movie. I know you can get it on Amazon. Happy reading to you! I am enjoying reading all of the recommendations so I can find more mysteries/thrillers.

Posted on Jun 6, 2009 9:59:01 PM PDT
Without a doubt ....

The Winner and Absolute Power by Balducci.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 2:09:22 PM PDT
Gisele says:
I have read many thousands of mysteries (honest - you should see my library) but must always answer this with the first mystery which got me well and truly hooked - Innocent Blood by P.D. James.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 3:46:16 PM PDT
S. C. Cuva says:
the bestest best of the best in mysteries is "the daughter of time" by josephine tey. really, this is the BEST. well, one of the best at least <g>
In Daughter of Time, Tey focuses on the legend of Richard III, the evil hunchback of British history accused of murdering his young nephews. While at a London hospital recuperating from a fall, Inspector Alan Grant becomes fascinated by a portrait of King Richard. A student of human faces, Grant cannot believe that the man in the picture would kill his own nephews. With an American researcher's help, Grant delves into his country's history to discover just what kind of man Richard Plantagenet was and who really killed the little princes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 3:49:23 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 9, 2009 3:49:55 PM PDT
S. C. Cuva says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 4:01:16 PM PDT
S. C. Cuva says:
Julia Spencer-Fleming and Philip Rickman write wonderful mystery series. Rickman's starts in 1993 with "Curfew", and Spencer-Flemings' starts with "In the Bleak Midwinter". They are wonderful, with strong female protagonists in unusual professions.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 4:39:38 PM PDT
Dewfactor says:
The Daughter of Time, by Josephine Tey

British, but not a cozy. Not that there's anything wrong with cozies!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2009 9:02:12 PM PDT
1. I love Georges Simenon's works. Best know for his Inspector Maigret detective stories (which are terse, taut and very will done) he wrote a series of 'roman durs' or hard stories which typically take a man and then an event sends him down a dark despairing path. Perhaps my favorite romans durs is Dirty Snow http://tinyurl.com/lgg472

2. Eric Ambler is another favorite. Both Alan Furst and Le Carre have indicated that Ambler set the stage for their work. I suppose my favorite is Coffin for Dimitrios http://tinyurl.com/n8bxk4

If either of these authors interest you - you can make your way to my profile. I have a listmania list for Ambler, one for Simenon, and another one for Mediterranean mysteries set in Sicily, Italy, Marseilles, and Spain.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2009 5:05:30 AM PDT
R. E. Conary says:
Thanks Leonard for the suggestions. I've read some of the Maigret stories years ago and remember Ambler among my mother's hoard but haven't read any. Will have to revisit those authors.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2009 7:03:32 PM PDT
Amanda Peck says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jun 10, 2009 7:07:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 10, 2009 7:11:23 PM PDT
J. arpie says:
I haven't read to many of these posts so I don't know if Elizabeth George has been mentioned.She is the best!Much more than a mystery,she is an awsome writer.Saw Phil Rickman mentioned ,his Merrily Watkins mysteries are also really good.

Posted on Jun 10, 2009 7:17:55 PM PDT
J. arpie says:
Decided to read some more posts.I see The Name of the Rose alot,I have that book and have tried several times to read it,think I will try a little harder now.Also Daughter of Time.Glad to know I have great books,shame on me for not trying hard enough.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2009 9:14:10 PM PDT
bettiola says:
I strongly recommend that you find an annotated version of The Name of the Rose, which translates the Latin and explains the heresy trials that were going on at the time. Otherwise it's very tough to slog through that first section. But the rest of the book is fantastic and well worth it! I love Daughter of Time. It's a classic and Josephine Tey is such a good writer. I just wish she had lived longer to write more!

Posted on Jun 11, 2009 12:18:19 PM PDT
KindleFan says:
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie is the best IMO.

Posted on Jun 11, 2009 2:20:38 PM PDT
The Anodyne Necklace by Martha Grimes (Jury Series)
The Rose Rent by Ellis Peters (Brother Cadfael Series)
Justice Hall by Laurie King (Mary Russell Series)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2009 7:19:50 PM PDT
J. arpie says:
Thank you,B.Hauck for your recommendation that I try the annotated version,I will defintly do that.I must have saved these books for years,they have survived a couple of purgings of my books so there must have been a reason for it!

Posted on Jun 12, 2009 1:19:07 PM PDT
Having read literally thousands of mysteries, this is almighty hard. I thought I was one of the few who loved Tey's Daughter of Time. Thrilled to see so many others love it too.
My first choice would be E. George's Payment in Blood, followed by Baldacci's Absolute Power, then anything by Tey, Sayer's, Christie, Dahmein, and Stout.
Preferring charactor-driven rather than action-driven mysteries, I also love Faye Kellerman's earlier works, but she seemed to run out of enthusiasm after a while.

Posted on Jun 12, 2009 7:29:59 PM PDT
No one has mentioned Bones by Jan Burke. A powerhouse of a mystery.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2009 5:30:59 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2009 5:31:52 AM PDT
S. C. Cuva says:
Yes! Jan Burke's novels are wonderful, I just finished Liar, am trying to read them all from "Good Night, Irene" to present, in order. Did read "Kidnapped" and "the Messenger" first. The Justin DeQuincy mystery series by Sharon Kay Penman takes place in the Middle Ages, starting with "the Queen's Man". They're very good also.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2009 6:24:46 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2009 6:34:10 PM PDT
Amanda Peck says:
I'm glad someone (ancient grandmother) agrees with me about later Faye Kellerman.

Even back in the days when he was writing Rex Stout struck me as having a really bad habit of getting us to suspect so-and-so, then killing so-and-so off. IIRC, multiple times in the same book. Fritz's menus almost made up for that, but not quite. But when I've reread one of the books, I'm still charmed by the characters, seriously put off by the bad habit.

My favorites--maybe Dorothy L's GAUDY NIGHT because, mystery aside, college sounded like it would be wonderful. Looking back, THE BEEKEEPER'S APPRENTICE does the same thing. Even if my college was nowhere near as glamorous as the ones there.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2009 12:58:10 PM PDT
M. Lee says:
I tried to read "The name of the Rose" several times and just couldn't get into it. After I saw the movie with Sean Connery, I went back again. Because I understood the basic plot, I was able to read it and really enjoyed it! Funny, I never would have associated this book with a mystery forum.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2009 1:10:44 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 19, 2009 1:11:35 PM PDT]

Posted on Jun 19, 2009 1:13:04 PM PDT
belfairwa says:
Has anybody any of the Frederick Ramsay books? I just started Stranger Room and am having a heck of a time getting into it so would love another opinion.
Thanks
Barbara
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Mystery forum
Participants:  266
Total posts:  508
Initial post:  Apr 5, 2009
Latest post:  Nov 29, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 59 customers

Search Customer Discussions