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looking for books that are laugh out loud funny


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In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2010 12:31:57 AM PDT
Brandon H says:
A Dirty Job is, by far, my favorite Moore book. Fool is good also, probably my second favorite. But I seem to remember all the books I've read from him have been really funny.

Posted on Sep 8, 2010 2:17:12 AM PDT
Country Girl says:
Parts of the first half of " Mennonite in a Little Black Dress" had me laughing so hard I was gasping for breath. I've also really enjoyed the old favorite "Cheaper by the Dozen" and "The Egg and I". I agree that most of Bill Bryson's books (extended sociological/travel essays) are usually good for some chuckles and guffaws. He wrote one bit about falling down a hill in France that I tell you has to be the single funniest thing I've ever read.

Posted on Sep 8, 2010 3:29:38 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 8, 2010 3:30:35 AM PDT
John Gaynard says:
I suggest the books from Tom Sharpe's Wilt series, of which Indecent Exposure is one.
The novels are very English, but the humor travels well.
In each of Sharpe's books there is quite a long build-up to the first laugh, which usually knocks you out of whatever you're sitting in, but once you get that one it is just about impossible to stop rolling around on the floor until the last page. Reading the first Wilt books is the experience that taught me how to read through tears of blinding laughter. Unfortunately it is a skill that doesn't get called on often enough.

Posted on Sep 8, 2010 4:44:58 AM PDT
Condorena says:
David Rosenfelt has a series about a lawyer Andy Carpenter and his dog Yogi a golden retriever. There are several in the series, is this the one you are thinking about?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2010 8:05:04 AM PDT
Christy says:
I grew up in the 'burbs and lived for a time in the far Northeast (which might as well not be in the city). However, Philadelphia and all of the things that it offers have been a huge influence on my life. Plus, I dated a guy for years who lived in Bella Vista, which was really great -- right between South Street and the Italian Market! I love Lisa Scottoline's books -- they usually have humor as well as the flavors of Philadelphia.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2010 8:55:23 AM PDT
Red Reader says:
If you like Evanovich, you'll love the Bobbie Faye series by Toni McGee Causey. There are only 3 out at this time but they are definitely laugh out loud funny!!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 8, 2010 3:47:40 PM PDT
Hersheygirl says:
And did you notice how everyone calls everyone else "hon" or "dollface" or "sweetheart?" Standing in line at the deli...everywhere. There's a genuine warmth to the city. :)

Posted on Sep 9, 2010 7:21:31 AM PDT
Wanda, try Buck Fever by Ben Rehder. (There's another Buck Fever by a female author, not the same).
It is hilarious.
(I'd pitch my own book Operation Neurosurgeon: You never know ... who's in the OR, but it turns funny witty, but not outright hysterical. A rising neurosurgeon faces his downfall because of a very calculting seductress).
I listened to Buck Fever a year ago on audio tape, and I must have looked crazy in my car, laughing along.

Barbara
Operation Neurosurgeon

Posted on Oct 7, 2010 5:04:29 PM PDT
Dale Andrew White's MOE HOWARD DIED FOR OUR SINS and RETURN OF THE DITTOS.
Moe Howard Died For Our Sins: made-to-fit tales for the maladjusted
Return of the Dittos
Some of the stories are available on Kindle as well.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010 6:46:43 AM PDT
Hi,
I hope you don't mind my suggesting my own "Y", newly available on Kindle for $2.99!
And yes, it's LOL funny.

The year is 2011, the place, New York City. A mysterious microbe has begun to infect women of child-bearing age. Though the medical establishment writes it off as a simple flu, and the epidemic appears to be dying out, a young New York obstetrician confronts a conundrum. In the past year, the ratio of boys to girls born in her practice has declined precipitously. Dr. Deborah Kruger suspects the truth: that infected women are no longer able to give birth to male children.

With the help of her husband Larry, a computer analyst, Deborah tracks the epicenter to New York City, from which the infection is already bursting forth. And, as years pass, despite hundreds of laboratories at work on it, the microbe continues to overrun borders and envelop the Earth. With Science unable to stop it, and the contagion rippling worldwide in an AIDS-like pandemic, how will society cope in an increasingly female world?

Unquestionably, some changes are inevitable. Companies hire more women; who assume more leadership positions, replacing the male hierarchy with their own female style of management, to great success. Among the younger generation, monogamy is increasingly replaced by polygamy. Wars decrease. Crime falls. Football attendance is down. Ballet is up.

At once a fast-paced thriller of a gripping race for a cure, a speculative tale about a futuristic society, and a comic battle between the sexes, "Y" is, above all, the story of real people caught up in a society they no longer recognize.

"Y"

Posted on Oct 14, 2010 6:48:25 AM PDT
Hi,
I hope you don't mind my suggesting my own "Y", newly available on Kindle for $2.99!
And yes, it's LOL funny.

The year is 2011, the place, New York City. A mysterious microbe has begun to infect women of child-bearing age. Though the medical establishment writes it off as a simple flu, and the epidemic appears to be dying out, a young New York obstetrician confronts a conundrum. In the past year, the ratio of boys to girls born in her practice has declined precipitously. Dr. Deborah Kruger suspects the truth: that infected women are no longer able to give birth to male children.

With the help of her husband Larry, a computer analyst, Deborah tracks the epicenter to New York City, from which the infection is already bursting forth. And, as years pass, despite hundreds of laboratories at work on it, the microbe continues to overrun borders and envelop the Earth. With Science unable to stop it, and the contagion rippling worldwide in an AIDS-like pandemic, how will society cope in an increasingly female world?

Unquestionably, some changes are inevitable. Companies hire more women; who assume more leadership positions, replacing the male hierarchy with their own female style of management, to great success. Among the younger generation, monogamy is increasingly replaced by polygamy. Wars decrease. Crime falls. Football attendance is down. Ballet is up.

At once a fast-paced thriller of a gripping race for a cure, a speculative tale about a futuristic society, and a comic battle between the sexes, "Y" is, above all, the story of real people caught up in a society they no longer recognize.

"Y"

Posted on Oct 14, 2010 6:49:22 AM PDT
So sorry. I think I have a sticky finger.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010 6:50:42 AM PDT
Shelly Fredman's Brandy Alexander mystery series is a hoot and a half! I recommend it highly.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 11:01:44 AM PDT
Hersheygirl says:
Christy,
Where in the "burbs? I grew up at 2nd and Cheltenham in Philly, but my favorite part of the city is South Philly. That's why I chose it for my series neighborhood. Bella Vista is a great area! Hey, last time I visited Philly, my rental car got towed across the street from The Reading Terminal (gotta use that in my next book. It wasn't my fault, honest! :)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 12:24:14 PM PDT
Annie B says:
Shelly--I love your series. They are WONDERFUL! Keep 'em coming, please!!! : )

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 4:13:10 PM PDT
Hersheygirl says:
Hey, Annie B,

Thank you VERY MUCH! I'm trying to "keep 'em coming." It just takes me a long time to "get going." :)

Posted on Oct 14, 2010 4:16:32 PM PDT
Sheila says:
No vampires, but I have been told my books are laugh out loud funny.

I hope you will give the samples a try, and that you like what you read.

Sheila
Hot Tea (The Tea Series)
Sweet Tea (The Tea Series)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 5:10:56 PM PDT
dolphingal says:
Read Mary Kay Andrews. I laugh so hard at her books..she captures the men are from mars/women are from venus attitude perfectly! They are all set in the South with great characters.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 5:14:07 PM PDT
Annie B says:
Shelly--Very funny. Just so long as you do get going and then keep going! I need a fix soon. No pressure, now. : )

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2010 5:15:00 PM PDT
Annie B says:
Robin L Sparks--I love Mary Kay Andrews too. I completely agree with you and I love the Southern settings!

Posted on Oct 15, 2010 5:22:24 AM PDT
I agree re; David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter series. Love the relationship Andy has with his dog.

Posted on Oct 15, 2010 10:05:54 AM PDT
She also wrote under the name Kathy Hogan Trochek those books were a hoot

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 15, 2010 10:07:21 AM PDT
Sheila Iloved your books Read both of them and they were great

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 15, 2010 10:12:59 AM PDT
Sheila says:
Nancy,

I really appreciate the positive comments.

Stay tuned... book three is on the way! =)

You have made my day.

Sheila

Posted on Oct 15, 2010 10:44:03 AM PDT
Check out "The Old Folks At Home: Warehouse Them Or Leave Them on the Ice Floe" by Barry Friedman. Available on Amazon.com in paperback or Kindle Format.
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Discussion in:  Mystery forum
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Initial post:  Oct 13, 2007
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