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Best Camera for film shoot


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Initial post: Feb 6, 2012 2:35:03 PM PST
Want to get either the T3i or the A77 anyone know what one is best doing most of the shooting indoors.

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 2:40:19 PM PST
Tom Martin says:
You mean VIDEO, not film, correct?

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 2:42:10 PM PST
Yep, sorry typed to fast.

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 4:41:51 PM PST
I have been shooting corporate videos with my T2i for about a year and a half. Just get some good glass in front of it and you'll be OK. I can't speak for the sony, but I LOVE my canons video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ_vx_A20Zk&feature=g-upl&context=G29229a7AUAAAAAAAAAA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zx7PcPcq89k&feature=g-upl&context=G2df454cAUAAAAAAABAA
Spend the money on the LENS!

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 5:43:04 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 7, 2012 9:03:21 AM PST]

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 6:44:09 PM PST
T. Campbell says:
Why spend $800-2000 on a camera when you can spend $15,999 on a new Canon C300 (body only - lenses are extra). ;-)

Yeah, I can't afford it either... unless if I eliminate a few trivial things from my life like eating food and being able to retire someday.

On the serious side...

Using DSLR cameras for video is a lot different than using a camcorder for video. If you're not aware of the differences, you'll want to make sure you know before you buy.

Camcorders really have no limit on recording time (recording time is limited only by when you run out of memory cards and batteries.)

DSLRs build up heat when they shoot video. They are designed to shoot lots of short clips that you'll put together later in your movie editing software. After about 10 minutes of shooting (maybe a few minutes longer) they need to cool-down.

Camcorders also do continuous auto-focus. A DSLR usually will not (Nikon's newest cameras do). It's not considered a major short-coming because in professional industry cameras don't auto-focus... the operator controls the focus (focus might be pre-planned before the shot... I've seen them wrap tape around the focus ring and mark the various focus points for each subject so the camera operator just moves the ring from mark to mark without any "focus hunt" showing up in the finished result.) You can order a Canon camera to focus while shooting, but it won't track focus continuously like a camcorder.

If you go with Canon, and you want to do video, you should probably check out the Magic Lantern firmware. It's a free third-party firmware but it seems to be getting a lot of attention among video shooters. It adds a lot of features to the camera that Canon didn't include.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 6, 2012 7:18:57 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 6, 2012 7:41:17 PM PST
® says:
the different between the two is the A77 will do continuous AF as other brought up. It is noisy so you will get a mic to attach (which you would do anyways). Then you will need a Opteka CXS-1 Video Shoulder Stabilizer Support System for DSLR (this being on the lower end price wise) because dslr video aren't very stable, even with the stabilizer in the lens. NEEWER® CN-126 LED Video Light

Since you asked today the Nikon D800 just got announced today.

"For professionals, it is important to have a camera that has digital recorders and external monitors. With the D800 is possible to transmit an uncompressed HD signal directly off the camera for an HDMI output (8 bit, 4:2:2). This signal can be transmitted to a display, digital recording device or routed through a monitor, eliminating the need for multiple connections."
-Read more on NikonRumors.com: http://nikonrumors.com/2012/02/06/nikon-d800-press-release.aspx/#ixzz1lf7s6pmq

they don't call it a dslr anymore, it's a hd-slr

Posted on Feb 6, 2012 11:12:19 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 6, 2012 11:13:11 PM PST
JCUKNZ says:
Apparently, according to Panasonic's marketing manager, their m4/3 cameras are being used in preference to camcorders due to their larger sensor and ability to 'add on' accessories ... I think that is the GH2 he was talking about. Low light shooting comes from the lens and ability to use higher ISO and there are those for the GH2

Posted on Feb 7, 2012 5:47:39 AM PST
Actually, T. Cambell....I've tried out the Magic Lantern firmware. Its cool, but I don't use it that often. And never on paid shoots. Canon did pretty well with what they gave us. The intervalmeter is pretty cool though, and focus peaking for when I'm using my external SD monitor. The audio monitors are cool looking too. Like I said, its cool, but not needed. Glad they made it though, I'm all about open source.
If just want a camera to pick up and shoot video, get a camcorder....if you can edit video and know basically how to shoot, get a DSLR.

Posted on Feb 7, 2012 8:33:41 AM PST
I have used Cams in the past for shoots doing Music video's and short films I saw the film Rubber and loved the look of the film then saw that it was shot on a DSLR and thought it would be a good cheap way to do a new project. Thank you to everyone for all the info it helped me a ton!

Posted on Feb 7, 2012 9:19:50 AM PST
aznpoet says:
Unless you already have Canon or Sony lenses, why not consider Nikon D5100 also? Takes great video and stills. Similar price range for all three.
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Discussion in:  Photography forum
Participants:  8
Total posts:  11
Initial post:  Feb 6, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 7, 2012

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