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Employers Screen Social Media Before Hiring: What kind of Privacy Violation is this??


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Showing 1-25 of 117 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Apr 22, 2012 7:49:39 PM PDT
MarcTheKing says:
This strikes me as completely unfair. My Facebook page is my own and I have a password that I alone know. While there is nothing "compromising"on the site, how are employers sneaking in my computer sites and looking at my life, deciding if they will hire me or not?? What programs are they using? Is this legal? Is this fair??

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/20/employers-use-facebook-to-pre-screen-applicants_n_1441289.html

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:05:24 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 8:05:59 PM PDT
I don't have a Facebook for one of those very reasons. Some employers will even do ongoing monitoring of these sites even after you are hired. I hate this and also credit checks and other invasive requirements for hiring purposes. It's difficult enough to find a job without all of this nonsense and it reeks of Big Brother.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 8:17:19 PM PDT
MarcTheKing says:
All the stories I read seem to just accept the fact that there is some kind of phantom program that "companies" use to hack into personal data sites like Facebook. I've come to accept that I'll be advertised to-- i kind of appreciate some of the ads I've been recieving based on my entertainment choices I've "liked", but this is beyond what I expected.

The idea of some low level personell clerk using some unnamed hacking device and then clicking through my FB page as part of the hiring process!! THEN saying to others..."Well, this guy sure does have weird friends, and he sure has alot of pictures with beer in his hand...I think he's not gonna be an asset to our company.." I have no idea what to think about all this. FB seemed so innocent and fun. Now this?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:40:47 PM PDT
reply to MarcTheKing's post:

if you dont want people to see it
dont put it on the internet

this is not a privacy violation
it is a violation of extreme stupidy by idiots who put such krapp on their onw web pages

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:41:35 PM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:42:09 PM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:47:49 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 8:51:11 PM PDT
LOL, what would you put on the bogus sites, whomper? That might be a good idea in some cases. Make 'em think you are too good to be true so you look like a candidate they can't possibly pass up.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:53:05 PM PDT
MarcTheKing says:
Whomper: I really understand the advertising side of it. But selling my info based on my "likes" to companies or entertainment sites doesnt account for Employers using my personal posts as a screening process. I understood this to be for entertainment purposes, like an online photo album and daily journal that I can post to to people of my choosing. I'll set whatever blocks I need to to keep that information private. But if there is some override that personell departments have to hack in, i'm really teed off.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 8:55:39 PM PDT
nameinuse says:
I don't have a facebook. As it is, I spend way too much time donking around on the computer to want to open that can of worms.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 9:44:38 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 9:50:56 PM PDT
D. Robinson says:
Um, they're not hacking in, by and large. They are either looking at what you have posted publicly, or if you have enabled privacy settings, they may ask you for the password so they can look at what you post.

I won't say that nobody is hacking in, but I'd bet that it's a slim minority. A business isn't going to take such a risk when there are easier and legal ways of getting the info they want.

Edit: I went back and read the linked article, and there's no mention whatsoever of prospective employers hacking into FB accounts. They just ask for usernames and passwords.

Remember kids: if you put it on the Internet, it's probably there until he end of the world. Behave accordingly.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 11:31:58 PM PDT
Your facebook page IS NOT your own. You don't own facebook. Facebook collects and stores personal information about you and sells it to other companies who then create profiles on you and sell that information to interested parties. So does Amazon, hence the lack of a real profile and picture of me here.

I know of several people who've ended up as security leaks, or crabbed on facebook about their boss. This kind of behavior is hard on morale and can lead to trouble.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 1:15:25 AM PDT
Lientje says:
MarcTheKing. As venus said, I don't have a Facebook for one of those very reasons. And I am getting fussier and
fussier about even giving out my email address. I order quite a bit of stuff over the internet and I have found that
you can't complete the transaction unless you give an email address. So I use go_away@gmail.com. I think
they probably get the message, especially when it bounces back.

One thing that has really upset me, is that I have been finding emails that I know we stolen from, given by (??)
Amazon. I sold a few books over Amazon about 5 years ago and I used a really weird "company" name to do so.
Lately, I have been getting emails addressed to this name. And trust me it is a weird one. They didn't just guess
the name. It was the name of the ruling family in Czechoslovakia a few centuries back.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 1:18:08 AM PDT
Lientje says:
Whomper: "this is not a privacy violation
it is a violation of extreme stupidy by idiots who put such krapp on their onw web pages "

*****
I'm sorry but it is also a violation of privacy. When someone can pay $39.95 to find out where I live, if I'm married,
how many kids I have, my home address, my phone number, and my police record, including parking tickets - it is
damnable invasion of my privacy.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 1:21:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 1:23:32 AM PDT
Lientje says:
All: "I know of several people who've ended up as security leaks, or crabbed on facebook about their boss. This kind of behavior is hard on morale and can lead to trouble. "

****
how true. And I reminded one of the people in the multitude of Jewish forums around here of just such happenings.
She is a teacher. And the stuff she writes on these forums are unbelievably stupid and childish and hateful. If I saw it and was the principal of the school, she would be fired.

I haven't seen her since. But then, that doesn't mean she will be able to stay off for long. This can be an
addictive place.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 1:45:38 AM PDT
My employers have fired our kiddies for accessing Facebook at work; they have security programs in the computer system which record keystrokes, so if they're willing, they can pull out logins and passwords to everything you access at work. As a rule of thumb, such security measures don't necessarily mean that they'll have the time and inclination to go snooping, but all it takes is having one of your fellow idiots at work do something incredibly stupid, and the mgmt can/will troll through their records looking for that and likely everything and everyone around it--all it takes is one of your team to download something STUPID and everyone around them gets examined on a history search. Anything and everything you do or access at work can be dangerous; it all belongs to them.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 4:20:10 AM PDT
Terje Alnes says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 5:20:38 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 5:29:48 AM PDT
Voice of god says:
I don't really see how it's a violation of privacy to access information people have willingly provided to the public.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 5:49:14 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 5:50:43 AM PDT
C. Batty says:
Spying on your employees Facebook pages is hard on morale and can lead to problems.
Companies need to accept the fact that they don't own what we do when we are off the clock.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 5:56:11 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 5:58:30 AM PDT
Ice King says:
Credit reports are bad enough, but this is ridiculous.
What's next, visiting our houses and checking to see how we maintain our homes?
I could just see it now,
"Well you're a great candidate and you have everything we were looking for in an employee but you had some dishes in your sink and you didn't make your bed so we're going to pass".

I have nothing to hide on my Facebook page but that doesn't mean I want someone going through it as a deciding factor in employment.
I also have nothing to hide in my bedroom but that doesn't mean I'd invite anyone in to snoop around.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 6:01:14 AM PDT
Voice of god says:
Don't worry, companies will stop asking for Facebook profiles immediately once someone's smart enough to figure out that it's a roundabout way of asking for someone's age, marital status, race, religion, or sexuality. Pretty easy legal argument there.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 6:13:29 AM PDT
Moderate says:
The worst thing is that it doesn't really correlate to your worth as an employee. As HR departments abondoned their histroical role and bacame Propaganda Departments many HR Managers are desparte to stay "relavant".

Its sort of like the big push for Employee surveys that are all the rage now. These surveys don't seem to result in actions but rather steer the company to talking points and propaganda. Most people don't even fill them out honestly for fear of retribution.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 6:48:08 AM PDT
TD101 says:
I had a chat with my boss about this. They do look at a person's public profile before hiring. And he admitted a few people have not been hired because of what they saw. I don't have a problem with them looking at your public profile. After all, you put it out there for everyone to see. I do have a problem asking for your login and password and expecting to get it. Hopefully multiple lawsuits will put an end to this practice.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 6:50:54 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 11:16:50 AM PDT
Exactly! What does any of this stuff honestly have to do with your worth as an employee? Most people behave differently at work than they do in their leisure time anyway. Shouldn't work experience be what they ought to consider, rather than personal interests or how you spend your own money? And don't get me started about having to pee in a cup for them either. There's one local hospital here who won't even hire you if you've got nicotine in your system, regardless of whether you smoke, use a patch or gum.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 6:51:38 AM PDT
MarcTheKing says:
I did not put information out for "everyone" to see. I chose my Friends specifically because I trust them not to compromise any information or silly pictures I might pose for. Facebook is for entertainment purposes only and should not serve as a reflection of my value as a potential employee. I sent in my resume, that should speak louder than photos of what I had for dinner on Thursday night.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 7:20:28 AM PDT
Voice of god says:
Cool. So in this pretend past-tense scenario, did your hypothetical potential employer ask you to friend them, demand your password, or use the "hacking device" that you've decided is a thing that exists?
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Politics forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  117
Initial post:  Apr 22, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 26, 2012

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