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O-nomics and the Regulatory Cliff


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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 18, 2012 5:47:00 AM PST
Magna Carta says:
>>But even without those disastrous developments, economic prospects for the nation remain dismal for the foreseeable future. The Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank's survey of 39 economic forecasters released Nov. 9 predicts that real gross domestic product will grow this quarter at an annual rate of .8 percent, down from the previous estimate of 2.2 percent. The central bankers also predicted unemployment would average 7.8 percent in 2013, Last month, it was 7.9 percent.>>

>>Stultifying, job-killing regulation has been a hallmark of the Obama administration. An analysis by Susan Dudley, director of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, reveals that with respect to "economically significant" regulations, defined as impacts of $100 million or more per year, Obama has been an outlier. While Presidents George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush "each published an average of 45 major rules a year ... the outliers are Reagan, who issued, on average, a mere 23 major regulations per year; and Obama, who has published 54 per year on average, so far.">>

http://www.ocregister.com/opinion/obama-377888-year-percent.html

Posted on Nov 18, 2012 10:28:10 PM PST
Katrina says:
When I go to a Park,...and see a sign that says..."Leave It Like You Found It"...I like that.
Sure, I have to go and throw my Coke can in a Trash Barrel, rather than on the ground,...but, that's ok.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 18, 2012 10:46:16 PM PST
Intrepid says:
Many US companies have had improving profits from 2009 up until 2012. The reason for the slowing of GNP is Southern Europe malaise as you should know in Norway. It is dragging both the US and the EU down and the people in Spain and Greece seem oblivious to why it is their fault.

If your buyers are in a second recession, you don't get purchase orders. We are ready to manufacture more. Our buyers are in a slump of their own making this time. It's not all about the USA nor all about what Obama does. Microeconomics and sales driving a recovery are not about what Presidents do. It is up to all of us to create market opportunities and wealth - unless we want the USA to be a nanny state with socialism. But the latter is *not* what we have.

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 1:24:57 AM PST
dss says:
Intrepid says: "and the people in Spain and Greece seem oblivious to why it is their fault. "

You can't really pin Europe's problems on them. The banks failed in England as well. Obviously the poorer countries can't handle the economic downturns as well. But they didn't cause it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 2:02:53 AM PST
Intrepid says:
The Spanish behave as if nothing much is wrong despite increasingly empty roads and stores. The Greeks are in utter denial. Yes, we can blame them. They do not work as hard as the Scandinavians or Asians. Nor are they as ruthlessly disciplined. There is growing impatience with their lassitude. There is a cultural and work ethic divide between the successful nations in Europe and the laggards. I am not sure the EU concept can survive that. This is not simply my observation. Many others have pointed out this important reality.

In answer to the OP, this is dragging down the rest of the world's recovery - not Obama's policies. Northern Europe, Asia, and US economic indicators have all been improving. Only a downturn in European sales all this year is dampening their GNP. However, the US Congress will wonsen fear and recessionary pressures if it does not act swiftly to at least partly reduce effects of the fiscal cliff.

http://www.europeaninstitute.org/EA-August-2012/europes-north-south-dividea-stubborn-chasm.html
"EUROPE'S NORTH-SOUTH DIVIDE-A STUBBORN CHASM...Simply put, it boils down to economics versus culture."

http://www.american.com/archive/2012/february/the-american-lefts-two-europes-problem
"France, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Portugal, and Greece have all been downgraded by Standard and Poor's, sometimes repeatedly. Meanwhile, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland maintain the highest credit rating."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 12:36:27 PM PST
dss says:
You are falling for the stereotype. The OECD says that the Greeks work longer hours than any other European country - a full 40 percent more than Germans. I've been to Spain - they work different hours, not less. Taking off mid-day is practical, not lazy. But we were working until 10pm.

They had austerity forced on them when what they needed was a stimulas. Like I said, the poorer countries are hit harder by recessions than those with more.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 1:30:07 PM PST
Magna Carta says:
The Northern Europe did its austerity in 1990-91, we also did major changes to budgeting too. The Mediterranean would be better off with their own currency, which is what will happen when sufficient poverty has been forced on people by the elites who implemented the Euro. The Euro will maintain poverty in the Med.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Politics forum
Participants:  4
Total posts:  7
Initial post:  Nov 18, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 19, 2012

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