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The Last Superstition The New Atheism


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Showing 1-25 of 54 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 13, 2012 3:58:52 AM PST
DRM says:
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Posted on Dec 13, 2012 4:10:22 AM PST
A lack of belief in the existence of deities somehow qualifies as superstition?

Um, yeah, right...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 4:46:48 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
DRM says:

[The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism]

What does that book say ?

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 5:46:43 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 13, 2012 5:51:18 AM PST
Irish Lace says:
"What does that book say ?"

For starters, the author apparently has discovered what the old theists like to call "new atheism." One can, I take it, recognize "new" atheism because those who are "new atheists" are willing to speak up and say so, challenging the old myths and superstitions and asking for new-fangled empirical evidence that their ancient deities exist.

This annoys the theists. The older, better atheists stayed in the closet and didn't bother anyone.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 6:05:33 AM PST
G. Heron says:
Jeff Marzano

"What does that book say ?"

The bits I have managed to read start with reviewing Aristotle's philosophy and from what I can see he is trying to show that you need more than the material to explain everything (especially mental states) and I assume that from there he goes onto bring up the idea of god.

One thing that struck me as strange is at the start he goes on a lot about the idea that atoms are mostly empty space (which they are) and how this might have a negative effect on people if they start to think that they are mostly empty space, he really does worry about this!!

Posted on Dec 13, 2012 6:23:17 AM PST
quert says:
For a different approach, try The New Inquisition by R.A. Wilson

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 8:30:20 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 13, 2012 8:32:13 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
G. Heron says:

[The bits I have managed to read start with reviewing Aristotle's philosophy and from what I can see he is trying to show that you need more than the material to explain everything (especially mental states) and I assume that from there he goes onto bring up the idea of god.]

Socrates and Plato were spiritual teachers. They were concerned about things like reincarnation, good and evil, and the soul and God's judgement on the soul.

I'm not very familiar with Aristotle since I haven't finished any of his books. I keep a copy of his Metaphysics in my car and occasionally read a few pages. At this rate it will take me 10 years to finish it. This should give you some indication of how interesting I find it and how well I can relate to what he says.

I recently read this bizarre book by Plato: Plato : Parmenides

The only conclusion I could draw for that book is Plato was perhaps envisioning the most rudimentary beginnings of what would become things like mathematics, physics, and quantum mechanics many centuries into the future. Plato talks about things like the one, the not one, the other, being and not being, and various other obscure terms which I still have no idea what they mean.

If you're interested in subjects where science, philosophy, and perhaps religion sort of converge the following books may be interesting for you.

The book about Fulcanelli is high on my list as one of the best books I have ever read about mysterious subjects. Alchemy seems to be a place where time, space, and matter converge in very mysterious ways. Alchemy is I believe a legend that has a basis in reality.

Jeff Marzano

Melchizedek And The Mystery Of Fire

Initiation in the Great Pyramid (Astara's library of mystical classics)

Fulcanelli: Master Alchemist: Le Mystere des Cathedrales, Esoteric Intrepretation of the Hermetic Symbols of The Great Work

The Giza Power Plant : Technologies of Ancient Egypt

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 10:09:15 AM PST
A. Caplan says:
Jeff Marzano says: ....and God's judgement on the soul.
>That would have been "the god's judgement", not G-d's.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 10:22:43 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 10:34:56 AM PST
Newbomb Turk says:
"Why do you say that ? What's your point ?"

He means that in Socrates and Plato's time the idea of a Judeo-Christian God had not been formed yet. Any 'god' they were referring to would have been a deistic god.

Posted on Dec 13, 2012 10:58:19 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
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Posted on Dec 13, 2012 11:18:26 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 13, 2012 11:24:40 AM PST
John Donohue says:
Good Lord!! They want $185 for this piece of dreck? Apparently Dawkins just needs to read Aristotle to find out that there really is a god.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 8:05:02 PM PST
Bubba says:
$175 of that is an irony surcharge for a theistic book to label atheism a "superstition".

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 9:11:29 PM PST
Astrocat says:
$185 for a new copy? I don't think so.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 13, 2012 9:13:22 PM PST
Astrocat says:
Now that one sounds interesting, Quert.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 5:25:46 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 14, 2012 5:27:33 AM PST
Irish Lace says:
"Socrates and Plato were spiritual teachers. They were concerned about things like reincarnation, good and evil, and the soul and God's judgement on the soul."

It's much easier to be a "spiritual teacher" if no one knows that the stuff you are "concerned about" doesn't appear to actually exist. There is not a shred of empirical evidence for reincarnation, souls or God. And "good" and "evil" are relative terms assigned to certain behaviors by humans for humans usually to control other humans.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 6:35:53 AM PST
Jeff Marzano says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 6:58:13 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 14, 2012 7:21:39 AM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:07:07 AM PST
Even if I ran out of toilet paper, I still would not waste my time on this book.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:12:03 AM PST
Clarissa says: "Sane, rational people believe,"

Believe what? Do you believe in Buddha, djinns, dragons, unicorns, fairies, and fat weirdos in red suits that squeeze down the chimney that you might or might not have?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:21:07 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 14, 2012 7:23:03 AM PST
I shall tighten up my post to exclude such thoughts. ;)

(Done)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:25:34 AM PST
[[[Irish Lace says:
It's much easier to be a "spiritual teacher" if no one knows that the stuff you are "concerned about" doesn't appear to actually exist. There is not a shred of empirical evidence for reincarnation, souls or God. And "good" and "evil" are relative terms assigned to certain behaviors by humans for humans usually to control other humans.]]]

>>> Jeff Marzano says:
Another completely pointless, meaningless statement from an atheist in the Religion forum. No value add whatsoever to anything. <<<

?!?

I could not disagree more.

Her comment speaks directly to the topic at had, which concerns some of the early attempts to expound on the subject of religion/mysticism/gods (IOW, superstition). And she is absolutely correct; there is not one shred of empirical evidence for reincarnation, souls or gods...

.....and "good" and "evil" _are_ relative terms assigned to certain behaviors by humans.

Facts, not superstitious nonsense.

>>> Jeff Marzano says:
I could take what you said and substitute many other things for 'spiritual teacher' such as mythology, heaven and hell, angels and demons, and many. many other things and your statement would be equally stupid and meaningless.<<<

You could take what she said and substitute many other things for 'spiritual teacher', such as mythology, heaven, hell, angels or demons, ... and the statement would be equally valid.

There is ZERO empirical proof for any of those things.

>>> Jeff Marzano says:
Which is fine except that this is a Religion forum but you just can't shut the hell up. Why is that do you think ? Why can't you stop running your mouth incessantly about something you say isn't real ? I don't believe in Big Foot for example but yet I don't go into the Big Foot forum and say this. Why would I ?

It's a mystery we will never be able to solve in this lifetime I guess.<<<

There is no mystery whatsoever.

UNLIKE the religious faction in America, people who "believe" in Bigfoot are NOT attempting to coerce the rest of the populace to follow and abide by their beliefs and taboos and prejudices.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:30:26 AM PST
For anyone who has actually read the bible, that doesn't really change what you said.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:32:39 AM PST
Come on... you were the one who realized I needed to tighten my post. It is now watertight.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 7:39:25 AM PST
It's only as watertight as the word in the bible.
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  19
Total posts:  54
Initial post:  Dec 13, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 19, 2012

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