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Customer Discussions > Religion forum

One-in-Five Adults Have No Religious Affiliation


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Showing 1-25 of 123 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 15, 2013 4:51:56 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 15, 2013 5:14:23 AM PDT
J. Russell says:
According to Pew the number of atheist/agnostic/nothing in particular has increased dramatically.

In 2007 Pew Research Center surveys, 15.3% of U.S. adults answered a question about their current religion by saying they were atheist, agnostic or "nothing in particular." The number of religiously unaffiliated respondents has ticked up each year since, and now stands at 19.6%

In the last five years alone, the unaffiliated have increased from just over 15% to just under 20% of all U.S. adults. Their ranks now include more than 13 million self-described atheists and agnostics (nearly 6% of the U.S. public), as well as nearly 33 million people who say they have no particular religious affiliation (14%)

With few exceptions, though, the unaffiliated say they are not looking for a religion that would be right for them. Overwhelmingly, they think that religious organizations are too concerned with money and power, too focused on rules and too involved in politics.

The growth in the number of religiously unaffiliated Americans - sometimes called the rise of the "nones" - is largely driven by generational replacement, the gradual supplanting of older generations by newer ones.4 A third of adults under 30 have no religious affiliation (32%), compared with just one-in-ten who are 65 and older (9%). And young adults today are much more likely to be unaffiliated than previous generations were at a similar stage in their lives.

In addition to religious behavior, the way that Americans talk about their connection to religion seems to be changing. Increasingly, Americans describe their religious affiliation in terms that more closely match their level of involvement in churches and other religious organizations. In 2007, 60% of those who said they seldom or never attend religious services nevertheless described themselves as belonging to a particular religious tradition. In 2012, just 50% of those who say they seldom or never attend religious services still retain a religious affiliation - a 10-point drop in five years. These trends suggest that the ranks of the unaffiliated are swelling in surveys partly because Americans who rarely go to services are more willing than in the past to drop their religious attachments altogether.

While the ranks of the unaffiliated have grown significantly over the past five years, the Protestant share of the population has shrunk. In 2007, 53% of adults in Pew Research Center surveys described themselves as Protestants. In surveys conducted in the first half of 2012, fewer than half of American adults say they are Protestant (48%). This marks the first time in Pew Research Center surveys that the Protestant share of the population has dipped significantly below 50%.

Comments?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 5:16:00 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 15, 2013 6:42:50 AM PDT
Ambulocetus says:
This trend will slow the next time we have a major, catastrophic strategy [EDIT: tragedy]. As Robert Ingersoll says, "calamity is the sunshine of superstition."

It will slow, but it won't stop. Many have argued that the retrograde stances on gay marriage on the part of religious institutions are key to this increase in the "nones." Among Americans in general, 48% favor same-sex marriage; among the religiously affiliated, the number is 41%.

Among the nones, it is 72%.

It will be interesting to see whether and to what extent heterosexist religious institutions like the Catholic Church and the Southern Baptists change their views in an attempt to remain culturally relevant.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 5:23:28 AM PDT
J. Russell says:
As I remember it church attended swelled right after 9/11 but soon dropped off again . I can't help think that major calamity has only fleeting effect.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 5:51:42 AM PDT
Astrocat says:
I think it's time for the old-time religions to fade away, or at least become less important in the daily life. That is not to say that I think we should become a wholly secular society, but the monotheistic religions have caused little but havoc and separatism, so it's time for a much more inclusive view of humanity, one that sees us all as one, regardless of all the outer differences that divide us. When we recognize that there is only One Life and that we are living it, then the religion that emerges will be a much truer expression of that inner unity.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 9:41:25 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Daniel Dickson-LaPrade says:

[It will be interesting to see whether and to what extent heterosexist religious institutions like the Catholic Church and the Southern Baptists change their views in an attempt to remain culturally relevant.]

It's not the role or mission of the Catholic Church or Christianity in general to bend to the whims of society. Once that happens all is lost.

Atheism. Homosexuality. Abortion. Recreational drug use. Those are all politically charged and controversial issues that conflict with Christianity.

Posted on Mar 15, 2013 11:27:22 AM PDT
J. Russell says:
The thing that amazes me, and saddens me, is that 20% non-believers of all stripes are a larger block Evangelicals yet we hold nowhere near that much political power. In fact to be publicly identified as a non-believer when running for office is the kiss of death. Why is that?

At 20% we should hold huge political power, yet we are vilified and scapegoated at every turn.
Why is that?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 11:29:32 AM PDT
The Weasel says:
J. Russell says:
Comments?
***
I'm pretty sure it's the War on Christmas.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 11:32:16 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 15, 2013 11:34:13 AM PDT
W.T. Keeton says:
So you're saying that atheists have grown to where they now have the exact statistical importance as the dentists who don't recommend Trident sugarless gum (1 out of 5)?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 11:37:02 AM PDT
"So you're saying that atheists have grown to where they now have the exact statistical importance as the dentists who don't recommend Trident sugarless gum (1 out of 5)?"

The key word is "grown"... or, should I say, "growing."

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 12:00:41 PM PDT
J. Russell says:
Well Bill 20% is a larger % of the populous who self identify as Evangelical Christians yet they hold tremendous political power and we don't. All I am asking is why is that? What % of the American populous is African American and how much political power to they hold? What % of the American populous is Jewish and how much political power to they hold compared to non-believers.
When you break things down into categories 20% of the populous is a significant %.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 12:05:10 PM PDT
J. Russell says:
The so called "War on Christmas" is nothing but recognizing religious pluralism of their corporate customer base and an invention of Fox "News" to stir up their viewers. It had very little to do with catering to just non-believers.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 3:02:21 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 25, 2014 1:01:52 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 3:19:14 PM PDT
Eric Pyle says:
J. Russell,

According to what you post here, what's declining is the percentage who are affiliated with a church or group.

On this forum, we see a lot of people who say something like "I'm not religious, I have a personal relationship with Jesus." It looks as if such people might be included in the "none" category.

Such people, who don't feel peer pressure to conform to a congregation's norm (even if it's a wacky norm) end up feeling that they can believe whatever wild thing they want to believe.

So the "none"s might not be atheists and agnostics alone, but also quite a few even wackier religious types.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 3:23:55 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 25, 2014 1:01:53 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 3:26:43 PM PDT
Eric Pyle says:
Now I'm eager to work out the rituals for Ericism!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 4:44:32 PM PDT
tokolosi says:
"...20% non-believers of all stripes are a larger block Evangelicals yet we hold nowhere near that much political power... Why is that?"

Because non-belief is not otherwise "unifying"?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 4:51:31 PM PDT
tokolosi says:
"According to Pew the number of atheist/agnostic/nothing in particular has increased dramatically."

OMG -- this is *exactly* what they* said would happen in The End Times!!!

Prepare for Judgement --the Second Coming is nigh!

(*Christian eschatologists)

Posted on Mar 15, 2013 8:58:09 PM PDT
If the End Times are coming, tell um to wait til after my steak dinner tonight.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 9:02:00 PM PDT
the pharisees and pagans did it

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 15, 2013 9:55:32 PM PDT
J. Russell says:
Eric Pyle says:
According to what you post here, what's declining is the percentage who are affiliated with a church or group.

On this forum, we see a lot of people who say something like "I'm not religious, I have a personal relationship with Jesus." It looks as if such people might be included in the "none" category.

My Responce
Actually what was posted included this
With few exceptions, though, the unaffiliated say they are not looking for a religion that would be right for them.
AND
These trends suggest that the ranks of the unaffiliated are swelling in surveys partly because Americans who rarely go to services are more willing than in the past to drop their religious attachments altogether.

That says to me that they are in fact agnostic or atheist but just are reluctant to use those words.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 16, 2013 12:17:53 AM PDT
Bubba says:
I also don't think that the unaffiliated are the ones who swelled church attendance right after 9/11, it was probably the affiliated ones who sporadically visit a church several times a year. It would be interesting to know if these people had actually increased their normal annual church attendance, or if their normal annual attendance days were simply shifted to that time.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 16, 2013 12:20:21 AM PDT
Bubba says:
My guess is that it is because the Evangelical Christians are organized into a group, while we unaffiliated are not organized at all.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 16, 2013 9:57:28 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 25, 2014 1:02:03 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 16, 2013 10:05:33 AM PDT
Mickey says:
MMX

Agnosticism and atheism are not the same as selfishness.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 16, 2013 10:07:34 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 25, 2014 1:02:12 PM PDT]
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  31
Total posts:  123
Initial post:  Mar 15, 2013
Latest post:  Mar 30, 2013

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