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Religion is an ancient idea, thought, view, or system. It is infantile.


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Showing 1-25 of 490 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 18, 2013 11:57:33 AM PDT
Sticking to it even today is like an educated adult still sticking to fairy tales that you comprehended when you were a toddler.
When adults stick to infantile ideas, the world is in confusion and in shamble. Religion, particularly the Judaism and the derivatives, is vastly outdated, and had became anti-social as the ancient era ended.

Posted on Mar 18, 2013 12:32:44 PM PDT
Stan Furman says:
Troll alert, troll alert...

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 12:43:02 PM PDT
Pro Tip: If you're actually trying to have a productive discussion (much less trying to convince others of the rightness of your position), it probably isn't a good idea to start insulting people with your very first sentence, while belittling ideas they take very seriously.

If you're just here to troll, though, then carry on... you're doing it right.

Posted on Mar 18, 2013 12:58:14 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 18, 2013 1:00:40 PM PDT
If mentioning the most basic facts, like the antiquity of religion, sounds like a major insult, then the idea (or system) cannot be a healthy one. If something is sound and coherent and bears any reality, it should welcome and enjoy criticisms.

(If someone pats your back casually to say "hey my friend", and yet it hurts like you area battered and mauled, that is a strong indication that you are a seriously wounded person, not a healthy one.)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 1:33:02 PM PDT
Stan Furman says:
<<If mentioning the most basic facts, like the antiquity of religion, sounds like a major insult...>>

True, but you didn't just mention basic fact, you also passed an unsubstantiated judgment: "It is infantile" and then, in the very first statement of the OP, threw in an insult: "Sticking to it even today is like an educated adult still sticking to fairy tales that you comprehended when you were a toddler". This is all very trollish, and your reply to MA is plain dishonest.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 1:48:14 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Mar 21, 2013 10:44:20 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:01:19 PM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear U. Kim,

In what way is being a faithful Christian "infantile"?

I do agree that our world is in confusion and in shambles. That is one of the reasons why I am so determined to walk with the Lord.

The crazy world we live in simply cannot satisfy my inner-most longings or answer the deepest questions about why we are here, why the world and humanity is the way that it is, and what my purpose in life is.

When I read the accounts of people in the Bible who lived in ancient times, I can see some very strange customs, but I also see people who are very much like me. I also see truth in the Bible and truth is never outdated.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:05:09 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:05:58 PM PDT
"It's atheism that's infantile indeed !!!"

If you dislike someone else's rhetoric, I don't think the appropriate response is to engage in the same behaviors you find to be unacceptable in others.

No, atheism isn't infantile... it's simply the label for a world view which lacks a belief in the existence of deities.

"Every atheist is sure his own death will be somehow all right."

What do you mean by "all right"? I certainly have no wish to die, and don't look forward to the prospect.

"And this is obviously based on the baby's memory about its own birth : ..."

Wait... what? Where are you getting this from?

"... the dreadful catastrophe turned into discovery of parental love - so why bother about death which must be just another exciting discovery?"

I have never heard anyone, atheist or theist, express this idea, and yet you assert that it is held by all atheists.

"Now religion is grown-up awareness about the possibility of wrong development before both birth or death, religion teaches how to prepare for the catastrophe of death."

How does the assertion of a deity (and, supposedly, an afterlife) in the absence of credible evidence for either prepare one for the "catastrophe" of death?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:22:27 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Mar 21, 2013 10:44:40 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:28:31 PM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Alexei,

You said :"Now the religious attitude is grown-up awareness about the possibility of wrong development before both birth or death; an important aspect of religion is the discipline and practice of preparing for the catastrophe of death."

That is an interesting way to look at it.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:34:51 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 18, 2013 2:35:23 PM PDT
Max Flash says:
Alexei: ...an important aspect of religion is the discipline and practice of preparing for the catastrophe of death.

Max: All religions that I am aware of avoid admitting the catastrophe of death by denying it in some manner. You can only truly undertand death by accepting that it is final.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:35:04 PM PDT
Astrocat says:
Alexei, unfortunately, you may be right about the "important aspect of religion" being preparing for death. I say unfortunately, because it seems to me that the fear of death and what comes afterward has been the whip held over the head of the adherents of many religions for a very long time. Not the Jews, because, for them, death is the annihilation of the conscious self and "sheol" is the grave - no hell, no damnation, just gone. But Christianity, for some reason, chose to promote the concept of heaven and hell, and thus incorporated fear of punishment. Now, that may have been done because it correlated with the wholly allegorical "vicarious atonement", but the point is that that fear has been the method encouraged by the church ever since to keep people in line.

What Christ taught has been completely sidelined in favor of that "vicarious atonement". Where the people could have been growing through service, through compassion for others, through acceptance of differences, they instead were encouraged to seek out the heathen, the apostate, the heretic, and kill them by whatever means. I'm still trying to figure that one out.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:36:44 PM PDT
Tessa says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:45:43 PM PDT
Eric Pyle says:
U. Kim,

A lot of the non-believers on this forum agree with you. If you toned down your rhetoric, you'd fit right in.

You might also try the atheist forum. They are prone to this sort of statement.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 2:56:27 PM PDT
MA: "I certainly have no wish to die, and don't look forward to the prospect."

"that's just that same infantile attitude, only in some another words. If you "look to the prospect" you may destroy your fragile state of being at peace with the idea of death."

You're making a lot of claims here, but you don't seem to actually support them with evidence, much less credible evidence.

You're making claims as to what *I* do or do not think or believe as if you were a better authority on that subject than I was... I, the person who is actually doing the thinking and believing you're commenting upon.

Please: show us some evidence.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 3:21:36 PM PDT
J. Potter says:
I die every night, Alexei, and usually rise again to fight another day. No miracles required.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 5:48:24 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Max Flash,

You said :"You can only truly undertand death by accepting that it is final."

Actually, I would say that we can only truly understand death when we face up to the reality of what comes after it.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 8:42:01 AM PDT
Max Flash says:
Vicki: Actually, I would say that we can only truly understand death when we face up to the reality of what comes after it.

Max: Right, nothing.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 9:58:01 AM PDT
Stan Furman says:
<<Max: Right, nothing.>>

"Nothing" doesn't exist.

Posted on Mar 19, 2013 10:00:27 AM PDT
frogperson says:
Really? What does a blind man see when he opens his eyes?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 10:18:11 AM PDT
Max Flash says:
Stan: "Nothing" doesn't exist.

Max: I'm not sure how this addresses my point.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 10:30:42 AM PDT
Stan Furman says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 10:31:38 AM PDT
Stan Furman says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 10:34:52 AM PDT
Iain says:
Dear Mr. Furman,

When I die, what happens to my consciousness of being alive?

Iain
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  57
Total posts:  490
Initial post:  Mar 18, 2013
Latest post:  Dec 24, 2013

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