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The Gospel of Calvin's Girlfriend


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In reply to an earlier post on May 27, 2013 2:28:54 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
,.-)

In reply to an earlier post on May 27, 2013 1:55:56 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
As of this morning, I am a racist. The Filipino people who have been caring for my mother are the kindest, most compassionate and friendly people. Not one of them has a college degree, they work seven days a week, and are religious. And I don't care what anybody says, they are the best people in the world as far as I'm concerned.

Filipinos rule!

Posted on May 18, 2013 10:56:31 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
...

Posted on Oct 12, 2012 2:00:49 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
They're huge! Who needs a house?

I've seen "smart" cars; the things on four wheels that are the size of a toaster?

LOL We're so weird! We've got such thing for cars, don't we? :)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2012 12:39:34 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
Ever seen the hood on a classic Deusenberg automobile from the 1930s? They featured a "straight-8" eight-cylinder motor, with all eight cylinders in a single row.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deusenberg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Duesenberg_Convertible_SJ_LA_Grand_Dual-Cowl_Phaeton_1935.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:1930_Duesenberg_J.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deusenberg#Etymological_note

I thought I'd heard of a 16-cylinder Deusenberg automobile as well, but I didn't find it mentioned in this article.

,.-)

Posted on Oct 12, 2012 11:10:40 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 12, 2012 11:11:36 AM PDT
Amy Hall says:
On the road, I saw the longest collection of manufactured metal go rolling along in the lane beside me. At first I didn't know what it was. It just seemed to go forever and ever. It was almost five hours before I saw the back of it.

1971 Lincoln Continental

The hood on this thing was longer than my own car! LOL

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 5:41:08 PM PDT
They like so many religious peoples have created fantastic art. The Parthenon comes to mind. Talk about geometry.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 5:10:42 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
Islamic art is... amazing; I had no idea! And they're *tiles*. Tiles! Think of the preparation! So my next project is to explore why they're so into geometry and what does it have to do with their religion? That's unique, hunh? Religion and geometry connection.

Like the Golden Mean.

The Golden Section: Nature's Greatest Secret (Wooden Books)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 4:38:34 PM PDT
Hi Susie,

I am glad you use geometry when painting. I am sure you will find much to love in Islamic design. It so beautiful.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 10:47:33 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 6, 2012 10:50:56 AM PDT
Amy Hall says:
hahahahaha!!

Actually, I've recently become fascinated with Islamic art, because it's so geometrical. I found this on Amazon, and buying it.
Islamic Design: A Genius for Geometry (Wooden Books)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 10:00:15 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 6, 2012 10:01:43 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
> She should also say that your writing "demeanor" is very pleasant.

Thanks! It's good to hear this.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2012 5:31:07 AM PDT
She should also say that your writing "demeanor" is very pleasant.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 10:34:15 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
Yes, this would work, using trigonometry.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 10:14:16 PM PDT
Eric Pyle says:
'prob,

I think this can be done without a protractor, but my math isn't good enough to get the answer...

Let's say you first draw a circle with a diameter of 25 cm. (That seems like a good size for a classroom color wheel.)

Then you want to inscribe into that circle an 11-sided polygon, each corner of which falls on the circumference of the circle.

How long in mm is each side of the polygon?

Note that the sides are line segments with their end points on the circle; they are straight, not curved.

If you know the length of each side, you could draw the circle first, and then using a ruler, measure straight across the arc to a point that is the correct distance away. That would divide the circle evenly, without using a protractor. No?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 9:01:28 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 5, 2012 9:01:56 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
> In other words, just eyeball it?

Sure, just sketch it in lightly with a soft pencil, and keep adjusting until it looks right.

,.-)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 8:59:11 PM PDT
Island Girl says:
'prob,

In other words, just eyeball it?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 8:50:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 6, 2012 10:01:14 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
Heh. The short answer, when my wife introduces me to people and they ask what I do, is that I'm "a math geek for hire."

,.-)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 8:49:18 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
Remind me not to marry you, prob. ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 8:37:58 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 5, 2012 8:44:52 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
> 32 is close enough

Hmmmm....

360 - (32 * 10)
# 40

If you mark off 32 degrees between lines in the pie with your protractor, each of 10 times, the angle between the last line you draw and the first line you drew will be 40 degrees.

That may well be enough of a mismatch to be noticed by the casual observer.

I recommend that you mark off this sequence of angles (in degrees), instead:

33, 32, 33, 32, 33,
33, 32, 33, 32, 33

Then the angle between the last line you draw and the first line you drew will be 34 degrees:

360 - (33 + 32 + 33 + 32 + 33 + 33 + 32 + 33 + 32 + 33)
# 34

The casual observer definitely won't notice visual differences among 32 degrees, 33 degrees, and 34 degrees.

This will be much better than having one 40-degree wedge in a pie that has also ten 32-degree wedges.

All the best,

'prob

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 8:24:34 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
no, it's with additive color, not subtractive.

a protractor?? good god, not that. 32 is close enough, I'll just squeeze the last one in. Thanks guys!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 6:17:59 PM PDT
Hi Susie,

I think it is hard for me not to include thoughts about our human experience in the universe in my art and writing.. I call it religion, but I am not too religious in a normal sense, obviously.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 6:12:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 5, 2012 6:15:52 PM PDT
Mystére says:
I'm a little confused here. How did you get 11 colors on a color wheel?

Primary colors = red, yellow, blue

Secondary colors = orange, green, purple

So there are six colors, a nice hexagon should do it.

But if you subdivide the colors into warm and cool, then

Primary colors = alizarin crimson (cool red), cad scarlet or cad red light (warm red), cad yellow light (warm yellow), lemon yellow (cool yellow), ultramarine blue (warm blue), cerulean blue (cool blue)

So I get six primary colors and three secondary colors, making a total of nine. How *did* you get 11 colors? Did you use white and black?

Oops! Forgot to subdivide the secondary colors! So then we would have a red-orange, a yellow-orange, a yellow-green, a blue-green, a blue-violet, and a red-purple. That makes another six. So six primary colors and six secondary colors. I'm still not getting eleven. Okay, I'm stumped.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 5:51:44 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 5, 2012 5:52:54 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
Yup.

# 360 degrees in a circle:

360 / 11
# 32.72727

# 2 * pi radians in a circle:

pi
# 3.141593

2 * pi / 11
# 0.5711987

Not the sort of angle construction to try with a compass and straightedge...

Trisecting the angle, anyone?

,.-)

Posted on Oct 5, 2012 5:13:00 PM PDT
S. Friedman says:
I hope you have a protractor handy. The arc of each wedge should be 32.73 degrees.

Posted on Oct 5, 2012 4:47:51 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 5, 2012 4:48:31 PM PDT
Amy Hall says:
Alright, let's how smart you are. I have a geometry problem; not for school, but for colour charts I'm making.

So you know what a color wheel looks like right? So if I have to get 11 pieces of "pie" into the wheel, how do I figure out how big they should be? First one who answers correctly gets to be the winner.
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  70
Initial post:  Jul 20, 2012
Latest post:  May 27, 2013

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