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If you ever wondered why god has never answered your prayers...


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Showing 151-175 of 3552 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:10:57 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 20, 2012 9:33:12 PM PDT
jaime says:
The Rebbe was able to affect physical reality, including the prevention of birth defects in the children of individual petitioners.

But now that he has died, we are entirely dependent on DNA tests, and amniocentesis, and so on. Nonetheless, it is quite possible that the doctrines advising would-be parents to approach their lovemaking with awe and purity may be onto something.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:11:58 PM PDT
jaime says:
Howdy, AC.

Does he always answer YES?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:15:16 PM PDT
jaime says:
I like you, Puck.

But I do not think that your requests lie within the power of prayer.

I could be wrong. Maybe there are people who can pray skillfully enough to win a blanket omission of all Down's Syndrome and all cleft palates.

The best I have ever heard of is the repeated prevention of an individual instance of either.

I have never heard of a successful prayer to avert ALL harm forever in any arena.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:16:18 PM PDT
jaime says:
People who risked themselves to help members of a different group, I think was meant.

Christian and Muslim atheists, if you will.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:25:27 PM PDT
jaime says:
I have enough faith in prayer to predict that prayer helps no matter what you pray to.

My neighbor prays to something I disbelieve in, and her prayers are answered.

The point of prayer is that you PRAY. Doing so makes a difference somehow. I don't know how.

Maybe it sends a positive energy into the universe. That's not really saying what happens. But SOMETHING does happen with prayer that would be stillborn without prayer. It improves the prognosis.

And it does take skill. It's rather like tuning a primitive radio....some do it with more success than others. It seems to be unrelated to virtue or worthiness. It may also be a talent, like singing or math.

I know some people whom I ALWAYS ask to pray for me. I recall a specific instance when I was about to have surgery and his prayers enabled me to get through it w/o anesthesia, which was a positive difference. It was not about his righteousness but about his talent or skill. I know many who call upon him when they need prayers, because his reputation for success is wide and deep. Certainly his prayers have always helped me.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:26:59 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 20, 2012 9:34:16 PM PDT
jaime says:
Bubba
What if they pray to the wrong god, and RealGod™ gets hacked off about that?

Hanalah
Good point. That depends on whether they ever promised to pray only to a specific one. If not, they are free to pray according to the faith of their fathers.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:28:39 PM PDT
jaime says:
Bubba
The observable benefits of both prayer and meditation on the person who prays or meditates are internal and are a result of the state of prayer or meditation, not because any sort of interaction with any sort of deity.

Hanalah
That is my observation. However, I won't swear that the deity is completely absent from the process. I am, however, sure that prayer in and of itself, as a process, makes a real and positive difference.

Like any other process. Drinking water, for example, relieves thirst.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 20, 2012 9:31:07 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 20, 2012 9:34:50 PM PDT
jaime says:
Spin says....

Hanalah
Yes, prayer is like that too.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 5:58:40 AM PDT
Brian Curtis says:
Vicki, the scientist's own attitude toward faith and God is irrelevant in such an experiment. Only the sincerity of the ones praying matters... and that's according to the testimony of the prayers themselves. THAT's what's being evaluated.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 6:11:43 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 18, 2012 8:36:28 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 6:25:22 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Jettos,

You asked :"Do Muslims who address him as "Allah" who pray for rain have their prayers answered in the same proportions as Christians who do the same?"

You indicated the criteria- "honors His holy name" for your question. If it would honor God's name to bring rain, then God would bring rain. God sustains His creation and He causes the rain to fall, regardless. Therefore, your question about whether Christians or Muslims get more rain after praying is moot.

You asked: "Do Jews- who don't accept that- who pray for the recovery of another Jew who's had a heart attack see the same proportions of recovery as Christians who pray for the same thing for a Christian?"

You placed this question under the criteria of "Is consistent with His will and plan". If it is part of God's will and plan for the life of the Jewish heart attack victim to recover, then He will see to it that the man recovers. Who knows? Perhaps after recovery, he will hear the Gospel and accept Yeshua as Messiah and receive eternal life. Perhaps not, but God may want to use this man in His plan and so will grant his recovery. With this in mind, it would not make sense to check proportions of granted prayers of the two groups because the actual criteria is God's will, not whether the requester is Christian or Jew.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 6:27:29 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 18, 2012 8:36:29 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 6:33:43 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Hanalah,

You are right that we have very different views of prayer.
I think of prayer as communication and a vital part of fellowship with the Lord. I can't imagine having any power unless He was using me to manifest it or if it was coming by way of the Holy Spirit.

By the way, I think you gave very good, down-to-earth advice to the mother on the previous page.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 6:53:55 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Brian,

You said :"the scientist's own attitude toward faith and God is irrelevant in such an experiment. Only the sincerity of the ones praying matters... and that's according to the testimony of the prayers themselves. THAT's what's being evaluated."

Are you sure you meant to say that? How does a scientist evaluate the variable- personal sincerity- by looking at results? It sounds to me that if the scientist ignores God's existence and power, the scientist is measuring the prayor's personal power, not sincerity. Conclusions about the prayor's sincerity would just be a value judgment or an opinion of the scientist, wouldn't it?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 7:21:42 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Puck,

You said :"Although Jesus put NO restrictions on the content of prayer, telling his disciples that they could actually move mountains through prayer, and whatever you ask for, it will already be done, etc.,"

I agree that Jesus told his disciples that they would be able to "move mountains" with prayer in his name. I am assuming that "move mountains" was figurative language. Nonetheless, this is a radical statement when you consider that he was directing his disciples to ask God, in his name. And the disciples did do some very amazing things- heal, cast out demons, raise the dead, spread the Good News and about the only thing that I have been able to do is share the Gospel.

Yet, when the disciples asked Jesus to show them how to pray, Jesus gave them a model prayer that didn't include moving those mountains.

Could the model prayer be for day-to-day fellowship with God and for the alignment of the prayor with God's will and Kingdom, as well as for experiencing union with God?

Could the moving of mountains have to do with a more specialized kind of prayer? Could the moving of mountains have to do with the mission and calling that God gives to individuals, rather than a means for believers to get their wishes granted?

IMO, Jesus taught numerous lessons about prayer and it would be silly to focus on just one of them.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 7:28:28 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 18, 2012 8:36:29 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 7:42:24 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 18, 2012 8:36:29 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 8:43:10 AM PDT
Vicki, thanks for the response.

I'm not being snarky, but so far your response does not indicate anything that would determine that "God" responds to prayer in any way that could determine that it actually is occurring, as evidenced by among other things, your statement "Who knows?"

Let me ask you this way: do YOU BELIEVE that "God's will and plan" includes higher recovery rates for Christians who pray for it than other groups who also pray for recovery, such as Jews and Muslims?

For that matter, do you believe that Christians who pray for it have higher recovery rates than atheists?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 10:29:58 AM PDT
Vicki says:
Dear Puck,

If a scientist wants to run tests on something, not just prayer, it is important for him or her to define the something and investigate the variables that could have an effect the results.

I realize that it can be confusing since not all of us agree on what prayer is and God's role in answering prayers. Hanalah has an altogether different outlook about the source of power in prayer than I do, for example.

God blesses non-believers, too. What is the scientist going to do about this variable? God may answer the prayer after the study is over. How does the scientist control for this variable? God's answer may be to take the heart patient home to Heaven. How does the scientist handle this variable?

You said :"IMO, that rather limits the power of your prayer-answering God. Wouldn't it be to God's advantage to prove the skeptics wrong?"

I disagree. God has a will of His own and a plan of His own. He has the power to do away with sickness and death and He promises to do so at a future date,
but for now we are living in what author, Leigh McLeroy in "The Beautiful Ache" describes as a:

"field hospital for broken soldiers. We're revived here, and many of us do get better. We're bandaged, we're mended, and strengthened to fight again another day. But that doesn't change the fact that others don't make it and that we ourselves will one day succumb".

Posted on Mar 21, 2012 11:17:56 AM PDT
King's Kid says:
God always answers my prayers when I ask Him. He either says yes, no or wait.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 11:22:07 AM PDT
Newbomb Turk says:
"He either says yes, no or wait."

How is this communicated to you? and how would that communication look compare the when a Muslim gets his prayers answered?

Posted on Mar 21, 2012 11:24:01 AM PDT
King's Kid says:
It is identical to how a muslim gets her prayers answered.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 11:25:17 AM PDT
Newbomb Turk says:
Which is how?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 11:34:25 AM PDT
Celsus says:
Kings Kid

>>God always answers my prayers when I ask Him. He either says yes, no or wait.>>

Praying to a rock has the same result. But Jesus said his god would do much better than praying to a rock. He promised his god would answer the prayer, exactly as requested. Here is what he said:

"Again I say unto you, That if two of you shall agree on earth as touching
any thing that they shall ask, it shall be done for them of my Father which
is in heaven." (Matthew 18:19)

"And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall
receive." (Matthew 21:22)

"And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may
be glorified in the Son." (John 14:13)

"If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and
it shall be done unto you." (John 15:7)

"Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you." (John 16:23)

"Is anyone among you sick? Then he must call for the elders of the church and they are to pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer offered in faith will restore the one who is sick, and the Lord will raise him up. (Jas 5:14-15)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 21, 2012 11:44:23 AM PDT
King's Kid says:
I have gotten an immediate response (a yes). It was not an aural response, I heard it in my head. I have gotten a wait (it's been 4 years and I'm still waiting) and there are obviously a no or two.

I would expect a moslem would receive answers in the same way.
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  118
Total posts:  3552
Initial post:  Mar 9, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 22, 2012

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