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The Supreme Destination of the World-Weary Soul


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Showing 1-25 of 92 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 19, 2012 2:06:20 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 10:24:46 PM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
The little toddler jumps with joy
and claps his hands above his head,
for no real reason at all.
His face breaks into sunshine,
the very livingness of life!
I saw this miracle myself,
and only moments ago.
Is the religion you have selected
and worked on for a lifetime
any richer than his?

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 3:24:22 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 3:25:10 PM PST
Jack Vix says:
"If your heart starts dancing with the living that surrounds you, what is the need to be a Christian? What is the need to be a Mohammedian? These are for people who are asleep, and have never tasted anything of life."
-Osho

I don't see how the thread title fits...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 3:41:34 PM PST
mrs exp says:
Jeremiah,
Oh if we could just stay like that. Living in the moment.
exp

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 3:47:09 PM PST
Television tells me it's Disneyworld.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 5:34:55 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 9:25:58 AM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
Wonderful quote from Osho. I hadn't heard that one, though I read a bit of his work. I hear that his followers were doing some serious mischief, but the man could write good stuff.

Oops! Sorry Jack, I owe you a better explanation than that. The true goal of the world weary soul is the state of consciousness illuminated by the dancing child I observed on my way home this evening. Nothing can capture that state. My poem is only a reminder of the paradise that was always within our reach. If it were not, how could it have been discovered, by a toddler of two to four years old?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 5:42:36 PM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
I couldn't agree with you more mrs exp. I wrote a line once, that I think bears repeating: "We could spend a lifetime recovering the sense we were born with, and consider it time well spent." Thank ya,
Ma'am, for dropping by!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 5:48:19 PM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
Did you ever see the movie Mark, called "Pleasantville." The young man gets trapped in his TV set in a 50s sitcom he loved, hoping to escape to a simpler life. His advent causes the black-and-white town to burst out in splotches of color when a reality never shown in the TV of those days suddenly emerged. Soon enough, the whole town wanted to tar and feather him for disturbing the plastic peace. It's sort of the real low-down about the problems of living in Disneyland. I recommend it highly.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 7:29:02 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 1:22:28 AM PST
Jack Vix says:
Oh I see. Yes, Osho has some great thoughts, but some of his beliefs are rather backwards. You really wouldn't expect him to be opposed to homosexuality. Well, he's not really opposed to anything, because he's dead, but... he had a creepy cult of desperate people around him.

Young children accept the ups and downs, they aren't yet clouded by the emotional dishonesty taught in our culture. They kind of let out how they feel and say what they mean, so they don't supress their negative feelings until eventually they find out that the adult children say it's a no-no to say negative things or talk about sorrow. So then there's isolated feelings and you are demanded to behave a certain way and talk a certain way inconsistent with your actual feelings. You are stopped from expressing yourself how you normally would. "What are you crying about? SHUTUP!" It doesn't matter if you appreciate something or not "say thank you" You feel mistreated "stop complaining". You're even told it's "rude" or "selfish" to protest being forced to do acts that go against your feelings.

We learn it just doesn't pay to express one's true feelings, so it even follows to not acknowledge them yourself, since they've been so invalidated constantly.

I think that's the source of the problem and why at first kids are so open but adults are closed off and quietly sad.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 10:43:21 PM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
Yeh, they really do a number on you! You described it pretty well. I remember in his book called "The Book," Alan Watts has a good chapter called "How to Be a Genuine Fake." As I understand it, he's saying that you've been hoaxed into an artificial social identity anyway, so you're not obliged to apologize for "playing a role."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 12:35:41 AM PST
Toddlers smile because they are happy. That's nice to see, but it would be a mistake to read more into it. An underveloped mind is not to be envied.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 1:14:52 AM PST
Jack Vix says:
Well, you can be honest, it's just not socially acceptable in a lot of cases. But Watts had many annoying wink wink hint hint implications to the things he attempted to say, but basically yes we are all actors in the universe putting on endless series of perfomance x to get reward y for a will that is out of our control. We've been seperated from being one with the universe by being born and individuated and given identities. We are still what we are though and it's completely natural, it's certianly not all artificial interaction. :)

I mean, if we could be completely honest we'd admit by action that no one is ultimately responsible for what they are or what they do and there is really nothing to celebrate or denigrate. But we're just simple creatures that want to do a dance to win patronage and play with toys and make fun of the absurdity.

Alan Watts was the only "God" believing philosopher who ever said anything I could appreciate. A lot of it I can't stand but he had great ideas too.

"Omnipotence is not knowing how everything is done; it's just doing it." -Alan Watts

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 1:19:38 AM PST
Jack Vix says:
Wow a troll saying something that makes sense. I agree. Ignorance is bliss. You'd be happy and adorable too if you were uneducated and didn't know how dark and sad the world is.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 1:31:50 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 2:13:35 AM PST
Here, Jack Vix, I'm not a troll. Who set up the "Pearls" thread for Bible quotes, hey? Moi-même. Who set up the "Your reaction to the Resurrection of Jesus" thread, still running after 21 months, with over three thousand posts, attracting 128 contributors? Again, moi-même.

I've caught you out on many occasions, and you don't like it. P

My very best wishes, Clarissa, (buttering up firmly in mind).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 1:43:43 AM PST
Jeremiah Cox says:
Thanks for the observation. But if I err, I err in good company. "Except ye become as a little child, ye shall in no wise enter the kingdom of heaven."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 2:42:33 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 9:24:00 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 2:45:59 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 2:48:56 AM PST
Jack Vix is right... At the end of the day we are all just simple creatures, and it is vanity to think otherwise.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:00:31 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 5:44:20 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:05:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 4:10:33 AM PST
When the chips are down, the plus points of humans are very slight, hence we needed a Saviour. He reminded us to love one another despite our imperfections.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:24:18 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 4:51:44 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:33:18 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 4:38:02 AM PST
>The little toddler jumps with joy
and claps his hands above his head,
for no real reason at all.
His face breaks into sunshine,
the very livingness of life!
I saw this miracle myself,
and only moments ago.
Is the religion you have selected
and worked on for a lifetime
any richer than his?

The toddler's judgment is unformed
And he has no perspective;
Every small pleasure is like heaven
But every small reversal,
Or even thwarting of his childish will
Can make him howl
Or fear that all is lost
This is experiencing
But not living
Not for an adult
Is this how you want to live?
Or is it merely
That you, being an adult
Still have no more perspective than the toddler?

Oh and one more thing
Silly thoughts don't suddenly become profound
Just because you cut them in half.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:51:11 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 9:18:35 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:12:05 AM PST
In reply to your last sentence : No, of course not. It is nice to see, and that is all.

Your thread is going nowhere.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:26:27 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 9:15:25 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:37:02 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 20, 2012 9:18:09 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:45:08 AM PST
Praising unworthy threads isn't part of a Christian's duty.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Religion forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  92
Initial post:  Nov 19, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 26, 2012

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