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Favorite/memorable Female characters


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Showing 1-25 of 53 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 23, 2012 8:21:33 PM PST
Fullme7al says:
So who is your favorite/memorable female character. Yeah, I guess you can list more than one since I will. They can be from any type of media that's kind of like science fiction.

My favorite.
Lightning--Final Fantasy 13 Video game
Kelly and Linda--Halo Novels
Jill Valentine --Resident evil books/games, even though the movies stunk, she was pretty hot.
Six--Lorien Legacies novels.

That's all from the top of my head, but I guess if I can't remember them right now they might just not be my favorite. I'll have to go through my library

Posted on Dec 23, 2012 9:23:38 PM PST
Old Rocker says:
Barbarella
Number Six

Posted on Dec 24, 2012 6:37:30 AM PST
M. Carole says:
Ripley. Honor Harrington. Buffy.

Posted on Dec 24, 2012 11:06:31 AM PST
Telzey Amberdon, Jirel of Joiry, Red Sonja, Podkayne Fries, Wilma Deering, Mia Havero.

Posted on Dec 24, 2012 12:25:26 PM PST
MommaCat says:
Dora, Hazel Stone, Friday

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2012 1:07:25 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Gilbert: I was trying to think of Telzey Amberton yesterday--now tell me who wrote the books--I have them in storage somewhere and have a failing memory--Schmitz? or a name like that?

Posted on Dec 24, 2012 1:10:48 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Miri Robertson-The Liaden Universe
Lessa--Dragonriders of Pern
Bev Teague--Rimrunners

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2012 1:19:51 PM PST
Fullme7al says:
Dora the explorer? Jk

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2012 2:13:35 PM PST
Larry:
Telzey Amberdon

Posted on Dec 25, 2012 6:07:49 AM PST
Motoko Kusanagi from GITS
Inara Serra from Firefly
Nyota Uhura from, well if you don't know where she's from this may be the wrong forum for you.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 1:17:36 PM PST
TO: Fullme7al

RE: "Dora the explorer?"

No, Dora is the artificial intelligence (AI) that runs a starship in the Robert Heinlein novel "Time Enough for Love." In fact, all three of MommaCat's picks are from Heinlein novels. Hazel Stone is a character from "The Rolling Stones," "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" and "The Cat Who Walks Through Walls." Friday was the main character in an eponymous novel by Heinlein.

Posted on Dec 25, 2012 2:25:21 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
I don't know what eponymous means, but I read "Friday" and thought it was interesting but really weird! There was something about her navel, but I can't really remember much about the book.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 2:36:06 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Dec 25, 2012 2:37:00 PM PST]

Posted on Dec 25, 2012 2:46:35 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Thanks for the info.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 3:18:04 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 25, 2012 3:21:03 PM PST
MommaCat says:
Dora was named after the one woman that Lazarus Long loved unreservedly. See The Tale of the Adopted Daughter in Time Enough For Love.

Eta: That was the Dora I was referring to...the original Dora Long. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 7:53:55 PM PST
TO: Larry Kelly

RE: "I don't know what eponymous means..."

Please see the definition below:
Definition of EPONYMOUS

: of, relating to, or being the person or thing for whom or which something is named : of, relating to, or being an eponym

Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eponymous

RE: "There was something about her navel..."

Her navel was actually a secret pouch in which she could hide sensitive information. Friday was a courier and intelligence operative for a private organization. The United States no longer existed; it had been balkanized into several different nations.

Posted on Dec 25, 2012 7:59:02 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Thanks Walter. I got old suddenly a few years ago and really can't remember stuff that use to easy to recall. I got into a Heinlein reading trend and read everything of his I could get my hands on. I think "Friday" was the last book of his I read. I can remember that some critics/reviewers thought it was brilliant, others did not like it at all.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 8:02:11 PM PST
TO: MommaCat

RE: "That was the Dora I was referring to...the original Dora Long. :-)"

You're right, of course. Dora was an orphan whose parents had died in a fire. Lazarus Long become her surrogate "uncle" from her babyhood on and later married her. They traveled along a treacherous mountain pass and ended up settling in what Dora immediately named Happy Valley. I don't know why the starship/AI came immediately to mind and yet I didn't remember the original Dora.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 8:09:50 PM PST
TO: Larry Kelly

RE: "I got into a Heinlein reading trend and read everything of his I could get my hands on."

Well, you can't go wrong by reading Heinlein. By the way, have you read the original "Starship Troopers"? If you haven't yet read it, it's nothing like the piece of fecal matter that's the movie.

RE: "I can remember that some critics/reviewers thought it was brilliant, others did not like it at all."

That's the typical reaction to Heinlein's stuff; people either love it or hate it. Myself, I grew up reading Heinlein.

Posted on Dec 26, 2012 6:50:45 AM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Walter: The movie was awful. It had one actor in it--can't remember his name--usually plays a bad guy--the rest couldn't act their way out of a paper bag. Dialogue was atrocious. Yep, I read the original Starship Troopers. I think it was written for young people maybe, but I liked it a lot. It has been so long since I read Heinlein and with CRS (can't remember stuff) I am sort of like a goose--I wake up in a new world everyone morning. I hadn't read a single SCI-FI book until about 1962--my younger brother loved the stuff--and I finally was desperate for something to read I picked up a collection of short stories edited by Asimov--"Children of Wonder". They were mostly scary stories, some with wonderful twists at the end, great plays on words, and I was more or less hooked. Never did learn to like Asimov's books, but his short stories were some of the best.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 8:59:10 AM PST
TO: Larry Kelly

RE: "The movie was awful....Yep, I read the original Starship Troopers."

It would be nice if somebody who has actually read the book and respects it would do another Starship Troopers movie. However, that's very unlikely in Hollywood. Maybe the Brits would do it. They did an excellent job with Dr. Strangelove and Threads.

RE: "I think it was written for young people maybe..."

Well, Starship Troopers is considered to be one of Heinlein's "juveniles" but it contains some pretty sophisticated political and social concepts, some of which seem to have been missed by a lot of supposedly adult readers. A case in point: it is explicitly stated that a "term of service" did not necessarily mean only military service, but could instead be service in future analogs of the Peace Corps or the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), or the Federal civil service, for example. A depressingly high number of readers have ignored that point.

RE: "...but his short stories were some of the best."

Speaking of Asimov's short stories, have you read The Last Question? I highly recommend it.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 9:13:34 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
"Motoko Kusanagi from GITS"

Nice. :)

Posted on Dec 26, 2012 11:17:07 AM PST
K. J. Hart says:
C'Mell, Juniper Mackenzie, Trigger Argee, and the three Witches of Karres, Goth, Maleen, and The Leewit.

Posted on Dec 26, 2012 11:29:35 AM PST
OK so it's as per usual with Hollywood a lousy misrepresentation of the book but I like Starship troopers 1. The sequels however just reek, well worthy of being erased and forgotten in some lost region of limbo.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 11:34:46 AM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Walter: I possibly have--but if so I don't remember. I will put it on my list and see if I can find a collection with that story in it. I believe Asimov wrote a story (very short) that my brother told me about. Some of the following details will be wrong but: A spaceship captain, probably of a small cargo hauler, is snatched out of space. (He is an American). He finds himself in the waiting room and there are huge doors that he tries to open but can't. He waits, fidgeting. Finally the doors open and he strolls in. There is a huge throne, but there is a mist so he cannot see who is there. Then a voice, like the voice of God, thunders, "WHO ARE YOU? The Captain throws back his head and says, "Who the hell wants to know". I love that. Years ago there was a picture passed around that showed a mouse who was about to be snatched up by a screaming fiery eyed eagle. The talons are just about to close around the mouse--and the mouse is poking the eagle a "bird". Resistance may be futile, but that's no reason to not resist!!!
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  53
Initial post:  Dec 23, 2012
Latest post:  Mar 22, 2013

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