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OLD CODGERS READING BACK IN TIME


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In reply to an earlier post on Sep 10, 2008 9:59:27 PM PDT
Stross Halting State- yes. Heinlein - only a few (6 or 7, I think). Asimov - about 30 or so books kindlized.
The way it seems to be working is that a lot of new books, particularly SF and Mystery/Thrillers, are coming out on Kindle at or near the time of paper publication. Some older books are becoming available as publishers catch on. There are also a fair number of free, out of copyright books, classics and such, available in kindle version.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 10, 2008 11:37:26 PM PDT
Thanks Dorian (I think). So far I have resisted the X-Box 360 and the PS3, but this is darn near irresistible. My bookshelves are bulging, I received a "lot" of five books today, and I just made another "lot" buy of six on eBay. What's a pathological bibliophile to do? Maybe I can talk my daughter, her fiance and everyone else I know to pool their resources for Christmas. Failing that, my savings account might just take a hit. Free classics! That just sealed the deal.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 6:40:39 AM PDT
Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr books as Paul French. They're a little dated now but I ate them up when I was a juvenile weirdo! (It was pretty weird for a girl to read Lucky Starr instead of Cherry Ames, Student Nurse.)

Gee, Gilbert, I wish I'd been there, it sounds like a party!

Hi, Brenda, You sound like me. I tell people that books are my only vice. lol No to the Kindle, yet. It doesn't have the books I want to read on it. Though when I went to Canada for my son's wedding I wish I had one. I took way too many books. But, it is cool and I might slip just for the cool factor if they ever started putting more SciFi on the list. I inherited my son's X-box and PS2 when he got his X-Box 360. He hooked me on Morrowind and now I'm lobbying for his 360 so I can play Oblivion.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 7:00:49 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
For a couple of posts: There is a new version of 'Cthulhu' in limited release. It will be here in Denver next week and I intend to go http://www.cthulhu-themovie.com/video.html . For those of you who do not know of it, 'The Call of Cthulhu' was released by the HP Lovecraft Historical Society in 2005 http://www.cthulhulives.org/cocmovie/index.html it is a very good reproduction of a 1920s silent film. I'm going to buy a copy soon.

Now on to old SciFi on Kindle. I have a Kindle and have been using it for months. I love the darn thing, and I fully expected to hate it. There is a very good selection of old and really old SciFi for Kindle. For example I have the original Buck Rogers "Armageddon 2419 A.D." and the John Carter series are also available. I'm not sure how many titles on on Kindle now, but it grows every month. I travel for 6-8 months of the year, often in 3rd World countries where books are difficult, if not impossible to buy and the Kindle has saved my reading addicted soul more than once. I HAVE to read for 45 minutes every night no matter what; I've done that on board a boat at Cape Horn and I'm not joking. With the new restrictions on poundage on airlines, the Kindle is a wonderful device. But the bit surprise is that even when I'm home I use the kindle about as often as I do a 'real' book. I suspect the people who object to the idea of Kindle were also aghast when clay tablets were replaced with papyrus ;-).

Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 2:16:31 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Tyro---I just KNEW you'd complain about the "Alien" franchise! Everybody does. Just because it isn't "E.T." but more like "V" I suppose. But everything else just fits a scifi definition. We can't hold as rigid a standard for movies and serials as we would the written word. They're a visual medium. The first two "Alien(s)" are my favorites, with "...Resurrection" passible. And I think that's what we're going to find out there, given Terra's example......"Strange Days", "The One", "Blade Runner" are more recent scifi, especially the new and improved BR. It is a much better soundtrack with direct dialogue. The others are worth a looksee. If you're into anime I highly recommend "Metropolis" and "Akira", Japanese contributions to cyberpunk.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 2:51:58 PM PDT
I just looked at my Amazon "save for later" list. While two thirds of it is pre-orders, there were 8 books that are out now that I haven't gotten to yet. Of those 8 four are on Kindle and 5 of 7 from my last order are on Kindle so I guess they are catching up. Maybe I need to write to Santa Claus.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 3:11:49 PM PDT
You won't regret it. Also, sometimes pre-order books don't show up in the kindle version until at or near the paper version release date.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 3:13:02 PM PDT
Yea Joyce! Another gamer! My son got me addicted too. Have you tried the Baldur's Gate and Champions of Norrath games on your PS2? We got those because they are 2-player and we could play together. They are great and I replay them frequently, especially when I'm out of books. Toys, you gotta love them.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 6:06:36 PM PDT
Bookaholic says:
I was running out of good SF to read so I got hold of Asimov's Foundation series, which I loved back in the 70s. Re-reading a book I once loved is wonderful for emotional comfort & stress relief... Only now it is possible to order them all online for 1 cent each--so I ended up ordering all the Foundation novels I gave away plus the ones I never read, plus all the Robot and Empire books! Reading them all one after the other is going to really help me with the continuity too, cause there were gaps of many years between the appearance of one and the next.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 6:14:34 PM PDT
Bookaholic says:
"They just don't make novels fun anymore. The timeless tone and spirit of the classics just seems to outdo the techno party of today's scifi."

I have been an SF fan & writer all my life but I agree with the above quote. I don't know if it's just "old age" talking but I just can't get into today's writing (or music either). I would love it if someone could recommend some good contemporary SF that is not about Magic or the demise of Earth or something else depressing. Where is the sense of wonder? All the marvelous discoveries about extra-solar planets ought to make for some wonderful SF!! I wonder what kind of beings live on those "Super-earths"?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 11, 2008 9:06:57 PM PDT
Laura

You might like John Scalzi's The Old Man's War. It had that feeling of invention and discovery for me. This is the first book, followed by the Ghost Brigade and Lost Colony. I don't find magic depressing but I do like a good adventure.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 3:50:13 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 12, 2008 4:14:32 AM PDT
Hello, Laura
There are many fine writers writing stuff akin to what we were brought up on. I mention Allen Steele's Coyote series, which takes place (in most of the first 3 books) on a moon of an extra-solar planet. John Scalzi's "Old Man's War" series is very good. This thread reminds me that in "Starman Jones," aliens herded humans as they did native animals, and for the same purpose. Something like that also occurs in "The Last Colony". John Varley's "Red Thunder" books do great homage to the Heinlein juveniles...Either the latest Varley or Steele includes a liberal sprinkling of those Heinlien juvenitle titles as phrases in the closing chapters. I liked Joe Haldeman's "Marsbound" and "Accidental Time Machine".
I still have the first two SF books I bought in 7th grade. "Sea Siege/Eye of the Monster" (ace double) Andre Norton and "Against the fall of night" by Clarke.
I read a lot of the Winston books at the Bangor, ME public library. Later, in the 70s, I was able to collect some of them. I read the Lucky Starr books back then too. I knew from reading the short blurbs about the author that Andre Norton was a librarian in Cleveland. I have more than 70 of her books, mostly paperback, but I really stopped reading her in the mid-70s. Likewise I have a pretty complete Edgar Rice Burroughs. I loved the Mars books, and enjoyed the humor in the Venus books.
I liked Clifford Simak, because his stories were essentially gentle, with some strangeness.
The first science fiction book I can really remember was one of the "Tom Swift, Jr" books. They were very cool! And I read quite a bit of Jules Verne early on.
An I read Armageddon, 2419 in 7th or 8th grade when Ace brought it out. It was wonderful stuff! And then the Doc Smith books came out in paperback!
And lest we forget.. A. E. Van Vogt, Robert Sheckley, William Tenn
The Christopher Anvil stories that kept me in stitches in the late 60s and early 70s are thankfully being reprinted. Well, I could go on and on...
for those who knock the older Heinlein, there is an interlude in Time Enough for Love where Lazarus Long and his young love pioneer on a new planet. It is a really good section, the best part of that book.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:08:33 AM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Baslim---I still remember ploughing through "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" gotten from a bookmobile at my elementary school. There were so many oceanographic words I did not understand!....The "Tom Swift" and "Tom Swift Jr." series probably had a great influence on me. They were full of the kind of positive speculation that filled literature until the '70's. Then the ani-nuclear people took over and we've in a decline ever since. Well, scifi is rebounding despite the pressure of the mystics. I just hope it's not too late....'90's cyberpunk is good for scifi-it has helped to bring more advocates into the genre.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:12:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 12, 2008 7:21:53 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
Laura,
Trust me, it's the age. Not all of the SciFi of the 'Golden Era' was golden and there is lots of really good stuff being written now. As to the music, I was taking the teenage daughters of a friend of mine to the mall and they put my radio on a Hip-Hop station; I shook my head and said, "I just don't get that!" One of the girls looked at me in a puzzled way and said, "YOU are not suppose to!" It's true! I remember my parents telling me Buddy Holly was 'noise.'
Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:18:40 AM PDT
Bookaholic says:
>I've tried but the old 'spaceship and sun' of the empire seems to have faded. Where is Terminus in all this? The mystical has replaced the practical in science fiction.

Yep, that's just what Seldon predicted, isn't it... science will be replaced by mysticism. Hahaha!! Way too much like reality. I'd like to see a novel about the near future equivalent of the Foundation... scientists on EARTH retreat to a far corner to keep knowledge alive. Maybe on Mars or something. :) You know I'm a wannabe SF writer myself.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:20:25 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
B.A. Dilger and Tyro,
You have to get the 'Director's Cut' of Alien 3. As far as I know it is only available in the so called 'Quadrilogy' (which should, of course, be a Tetralogy). There is also an explanation about how this movie was ruined by studio executives. David Fincher was an unknown at the time and he has refused to have anything to do with later editions but he filmed a commentary for this edition; and the studio cut it. It is probably the most 'scientific' of all the Alien movies and worth tracking down. As to whether or not 'Alien(s)' is or is not SciFi? Seems to be splitting hairs to me. Space Ships, Alien Monsters, Toxic Planets? What more do you want?
Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:34:27 AM PDT
lingcod9 says:
My brother and I share the same passion as you. In fact he's been trying to find the artwork previlant on the inside covers of books about that time.
Age is measured in attitude, not years. I was born 1950 and 'am younger than many teenagers today.
Is your last name spelled correctly. Curious.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 7:39:03 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 12, 2008 7:46:51 AM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Steven---I agree about Alien 3 being very scifish-it just wears you down with the endless passages. The Alien franchise is probably the most successful in movie scifidom. It is hard-core science fiction as I know it.When I received my Alien Quadrilogy it took about two weeks to absorb. It is impressive! If NASA went to the lengths some of the scifi movie directors do we should have a colony on the moon already.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 8:39:49 PM PDT
"Laura,
Trust me, it's the age. Not all of the SciFi of the 'Golden Era' was golden and there is lots of really good stuff being written now. As to the music, I was taking the teenage daughters of a friend of mine to the mall and they put my radio on a Hip-Hop station; I shook my head and said, "I just don't get that!" One of the girls looked at me in a puzzled way and said, "YOU are not suppose to!" It's true! I remember my parents telling me Buddy Holly was 'noise.'
Steven "

Well, I guess I was a late starter. I am fifty with a ten year old daughter. The problem is, I do get it. I enjoy the music my daughter wants to listen to. I just don't think it is appropriate for a girl her age. Too many of the hip hop songs have themes that degrade women (and I think my little girl). Maybe I am an old fogey (grins). Now if only I could convince her to like Doc Savage or John Carter of Mars. Can I consider Doc Savage science fiction? At the time it was written all his gadgets were pretty futuristic. A little predictable perhaps but I sure loved all the action.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2008 8:41:58 PM PDT
Staub, a good old German name. Means dust I believe. Hmm, look on my endtables.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 13, 2008 5:28:23 AM PDT
Bookaholic says:
>Age is measured in attitude, not years. I was born 1950 and 'am younger than many teenagers today.

This is an interesting statement...could you elaborate? Sometimes I feel like a kid myself, except that over a lifetime of bitter experience I have become very cynical.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 13, 2008 5:49:46 AM PDT
Laura, I empathize completely. However, if you want to talk cynical try to reason with a teenager. It's taken me many, many years to get my kids politically motivated (at all). They, and their friends, wouldn't vote. Why? "Because it wouldn't go any good anyway, so why bother." Go to school? "The teachers all suck, won't teach anything useful, and there aren't any jobs out there anyway." It goes on from there.

Fortunately we got through it with minimal damage, but that's just one of the things that bred my cynicism. :)

P.S. At 7:30 AM the wind started up here in Pflugerville (just NE of Austin) TX. Must be a real bugger further south (understatement alert).

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 13, 2008 6:02:54 AM PDT
I, too, have gone back to read many of the classic Sci Fi I read as a kid. The Dune series, Norton, Heinlein, Clark, Sturgeon (sp? It's very late and I work nights, forgive the spelling). I am not yet a 'codger', but it may count as I started reading Sci Fi when I was 6. I remember being told by the school librarian that I couldn't check out a certain book (Sci Fi of course) because it was in the teen section and I was too young. I complained to my mother when I got home, but it didn't get me anywhere. I ended up getting my own library card to the local public library and spending my Saturdays there.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 13, 2008 6:52:14 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 13, 2008 7:03:29 AM PDT
Dale, many of those grand old books you so enjoy don't exactly promote a good self image in young girls either. No they don't degrade them or promote violence but they do have a condescending and patronizing attitude. Even Dale Arden steps back with a scream to let Buck defend her. (As opposed to Princess Leia who shoves Luke aside to save him.) Old Sci Fi was the best place to find strong brainy women but they weren't appreciated or treated as partners. It is the main reason I don't reread pre-70s fiction. Too often books and authors I liked have attitudes towards the women that make me cringe. I do better with the books that don't have women in them beyond traditional roles. I always identified with the hero because I only had Wonder Woman for a female role model (in Sci Fi).

Don't pepper me with the exceptions. I will allow there were some and i read it all but in an unenlightened state. Trust me, as a child in the 50s and a teen in the 60s
I didn't recognize the insidious attitude and I don't think many men can either even now. Now, I wonder how I could read it at all. The women who wrote, like Norton, were much better.

Brenda, hope things go okay with the storm. I live just north of New Orleans and we began getting wind from Ike on Thursday and it is still windy but not like Katrina or Gustav or even Fay.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 13, 2008 7:39:48 AM PDT
Tyro says:
Steven Bissell -- You're probably right about the splitting hairs bit. SF is just too many-branched these days, and holding forth to an older model of interpretations simply makes one's conceptions more outdated than ever. I do own the "Quadrilogy," and I screened the restored version of Alien 3 with some curiosity, as I'd always thought it the oddest of the series, a sort of "Joan of Arc goes to hell" entry with not-so-subtle theological undertones. Other than fleshing out a lot of the exposition, though, there seemed to be no major revelations. I haven't yet played back the directory's commentary on this film, though.
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
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Initial post:  Aug 2, 2008
Latest post:  May 10, 2014

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