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OLD CODGERS READING BACK IN TIME


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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2008 7:55:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 27, 2008 7:56:55 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
I recently found a copy of 'Hothouse' by Brian Aldiss. I bought it on a whim without really looking at it. It turns out to be the original version of 'The Long Afternoon of Earth' which was published in the USA in 1962 minus about 20,000 words from the British Edition. It seems that despite Aldiss' reputation, the USA publishers were concerned about it. The full version came out in 1976 when Aldiss became a really big name in SciFi. Nowadays SciFi is treated pretty much like any other genre, but at one time Kurt Vonnegut remarked that critics and publishers tended to put all SciFi in one drawer. . .and then use the drawer as a urinal.

BTW, as everyone is aware Vonnegut died recently. I recommend 'A Man Without a Country' as being as close to a memoir as you are likely to read.

Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2008 5:02:43 PM PDT
Hey, Joyce...
There were 4 books in the series:
1) Space Cat
2) Space Cat Visits Venus
3) Space Cat Meets Mars
4) Space Cat and the Kittens
Somehow, I didn't get to read the first and the fourth when little. I guess my school library didn't have them. Many years later, I tracked down copies of all four and read them to my daughter when she was 8. We loved them.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2008 5:59:34 PM PDT
Hello everyone and what a delight to discover this thread! I just turned 63 a few days ago so I qualify for the Old Codgers SF/Fantasy Book Club as well. My entry into these genres was Bradbury's "Martian Chronicles." I've been a lost soul ever since. I am also re-building (and building) my collection. I have four bookcases stuffed double and stacked and still I feel like I've barely started. It's great to get all of the reminders and recommendation from you!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2008 6:12:13 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 27, 2008 6:20:45 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Hello Brenda--Glad you love scifi. I have here in my hand "The Stories Of Ray Bradbury" put out by Alfred A. Knopf in 1980. It is 884 pages and has 100 stories including "There Will Come Soft Rains" and "The Golden Apples Of The Sun". Mr. Bradbury can sure bring back memories.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2008 7:23:53 PM PDT
Whoop! Just wrote "The Stories of Ray Bradbury" down on my wish list. And yes, Bradbury is like comfort food to me. When it comes to spinning a great yarn, he's hard to beat.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 7:20:15 AM PDT
Zack G.C. says:
I agree Brenda. Bradbury is my favorite. I've never found a better short story writer. He could make anything interesting (like Dandelion Wine. It had almost no story, yet he made it interesting because it displayed all the wonders of life!) . His personification really makes his stories special. =)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 10:58:18 AM PDT
Angelicat says:
My favorite Bradbury short is "All Of Summer In A Day." So sad, but I love it. There was a short film made of it for PBS's series "Wonderworks" back a couple of decades. I never forgot that one.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 12:01:08 PM PDT
"Dandelion Wine" is another one of my books that disappeared over the years and I have to replace. Isn't this the one that describes the young boy's grandmother's kitchen as chaotic, but she knows exactly where to put her hands to find anything she wants and creates magic with her cooking? Then, I seem to remember, his mother decides to "straighten up" and his grandmother is lost in her own kitchen. Whether this is the story or not, that image had stuck with me through the years.

BTW, If any of you are on MySpace, come visit me at http://www.myspace.com/brynnrose_thorn. We should talk (grin).

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 12:39:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 28, 2008 12:41:53 PM PDT
mostserene1 says:
Yea! I just received my Amazon (3rd party vendor) copy of Andre Norton's "Star Flight," a baen reissue that includes The Stars are Ours and Starborn, 2 novels i remember fondly from when I read them at age 10 or 11.

So excuse me while I dig into this morsel of nostalgia.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 1:29:36 PM PDT
Zack G.C. says:
Yes, Brenda, I'm pretty sure that was on a page or two in Dandelion Wine.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 3:26:39 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 28, 2008 3:39:10 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Bradbury could really work the nostalgic angle. What surprises me is that volume of Bradbury's I had was in my fiction collection and that probably saved it. I believe he was a trans-genre fiction writer that just happened to have a science locale.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 3:49:00 PM PDT
Well, I suppose that you're somewhat correct, but he's definitely SF because of his "universal" appeal (heh, heh, heh).

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 4:02:46 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Hey Brenda---For want of the correct term I'll say that a writer's style has an "atmosphere" about it. And Bradbury has this effecting his works. Since I've read Lord how many novels, novelettes, and short stories over my brief existence, I'm sensitive to an author's "gestalt". Bradbury has a clean, bright style. Whereas most scifi is dense, heavy.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 4:37:13 PM PDT
Hey Dilger---Come to think of it, you have a point. However, when I'm in the mood for a lighter style I go to Robert Asprin or Terry Pratchett a lot. However, many of my other favorite authors, that are generally known to be heavier, have produced works that would qualify. For instance Zelazny's "Night in the Lonesome October" for one.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 5:04:28 PM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
My memory isn't too great for the scifi I read before the loss of my collection in the early '90's. History and literature became my intense interest until late last year when I started reading scifi again. The scifi is literally piled on the floor of my living room because there is no more space for it. I have Terry Pratchett's "Making Money" waiting to be read as well as a "Conan" and a scifi annual plus the two I'm reading now. Busy, busy, busy!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 28, 2008 5:26:52 PM PDT
I love history as well and I'm also stalking some of the great literature that I lost. Right now I'm working on Dickens. I don't have "Making Money" let me know if you like it. Burroughs is great isn't he! I also have to replace a lot of his. Why aren't I wealthy? (sob)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 7:10:24 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
I heard Bradbury speak one time about his writing. He said that SciFi more than any other genre allowed him to think in what he called a 'what if' mode. He also said that SciFi allowed him to tap into feelings in ways other genres did not. I agree that some of this stuff is more 'experimental' than SciFi, but I'm sure glad us SciFi nuts got him instead of the literati.
Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 8:39:09 AM PDT
Steven, you just said it all! And, can I hear an AMEN for the last sentence!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 9:53:21 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 29, 2008 9:57:30 AM PDT
My favorite Bradbury short story is A Miracle of Rare Device. I bought myself Machineries of Joy for Christmas used from Amazon that included it. I was astonished that none of the currently in print Bradbury collections include Miracle (or at least i couldn't find one). That bittersweet quality is also found in a Sturgeon short called The Saucer of Loneliness, another favorite. My favorite Bradbury novel is Something Wicked This Way Comes. Also, thanks Lee for the heads up on Space Cat. an off topic aside to Lee: My other fascination that started when young was dinosaurs. Did you read Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek? My school library got that when I was in 2nd grade. I found a copy years later at a used book sale and bought it, only to lose it again in a house fire. :(

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 11:05:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 29, 2008 11:05:39 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
BTW, when Ray Bradbury wrote 'Dandelion Wine' it was a good deal longer. His publisher asked him to cut out the last half and publish it later. Bradbury waited 50 years! 'Farewell Summer' is the continuation of 'Dandelion Wine' and I won't spoil it by saying more. Bradbury is 88 years old and as far as I know going strong.

Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 11:20:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 29, 2008 11:25:12 AM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Joyce--My Bradbury omnibus didn't have 'Miracle' , but I dug up something interesting. I have a VHS tape of "Something Wicked Comes This Way" starring Jason Robards, Jonathan Pryce, Diane Ladd, Pam Grier. Music by James Horner! Ray Bradbury wrote the screenplay. There must be a dozen of his stories made into movies but I ran into this somewhere.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 11:28:07 AM PDT
Sorry, I haven't heard of "Shy Stegosaurus". As a kid, I enjoyed "The Enormous Egg" by Oliver Butterworth, in which a Triceratops somehow hatched out of a chicken's egg. (This was long before "Jurassic Park" was written.) Hve fun!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 11:34:49 AM PDT
Canticle was one of my favorites when it first came out. I even got my mother to read it and,though she was not an SF fan she quite liked it too. I guess I can join the sf codgers group too.

I'd love to take your class, especially if Canticle is on the reading list.

My first SF book was Dune. I got bumped off a standby flight back to school and and picked it up at the airport . Spent all night on Arrakis while listening to the cleaning staff polish the floors. To this day when I catch a whiff of that industrial cleaning fluid, I'm back with Paul riding a giant worm through the desert.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2008 11:41:34 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
Hope you didn't pay too much, it's readily available for less than US$2 on Amazon. There are two versions of 'Hawksbill Station' as well; one is a short 'novella' published in Galaxy Science Fiction in 1967 and the other is an extended novel version published in 1968.

Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2008 3:14:12 PM PDT
Bill C. says:
Hello out there:

I've noticed that no one has mentioned the "Winston Science Fiction" Juvenile series from the 50's and early 60's. Along with Heinlein's juveniles, I thought these were the most consistently enjoyable reads of my younger days. Over the last few years I've purchased the complete collection and for the most part they stand the test of time.

As to being a "codger", although I was born in 1947 I only take note of the anniversaries of my last official B/day, my 35th. It seems a good age to hold at! (I also have three 35 year old sisters, all born in different years.) Not to mention a daughter that just turned 35...

Bill C.
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  146
Total posts:  948
Initial post:  Aug 2, 2008
Latest post:  May 10, 2014

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