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How To Stop A Killer Asteroid


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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 27, 2010 2:27:18 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Evan,

OT.

"Because he was a notable psychologist? I think you meant to arrogantly berate her for not knowing her PHILOSOPHY."

To quote Frederich Nietzsche himself from Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is (Oxford World's Classics): 'That a psychologist without equal speaks from my writings-this is perhaps the first insight gained by a good reader. . . . Who among the philosophers before me was in any way a psychologist? Before me there simply was no psychology.'

Nietzsche's ideas relating to 'self-creation' formed the foundations of humanistic psychology in influencing the concept of 'self-realization'.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 27, 2010 8:47:37 PM PDT
TO: M. Helsdon
RE: "Looks like we won't see the next one coming..."

$2m-$3m? Is that all? I bet the government spends more than that on studies on the mating habits of Monarch butterflies! It almost makes me wish for an asteroid strike just so I could say to the congresscritters, "That'll learn ya...!" [I'm being very tongue-in-cheek here.]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 27, 2010 10:55:59 PM PDT
Yeah. There's never enough money for those minor projects like trying to save the species from total destruction.
But pay for some golf match or other game that pays millions that we've got plenty of money for.
We are going to get hit one day and the warning will be very short and those morons who make the decisions now will be screaming that we should have done something years ago!
Who cares anyway.
When you're dead you're dead.
It doesn't matter if you die of "natural causes" or wiped out by an asteroid.
You're not going to miss out on anything nor will you be remembered.
So just keep smiling and "Don't worry! Be happy!" (M.B.)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 27, 2010 10:58:47 PM PDT
We could pray for a small one to wipe out Wash. D.C., Moscow, Paris etc. and waste all those morons at once.

Posted on Mar 28, 2010 8:35:17 AM PDT
Ronald Craig says:
An asteroid strike would be so much more interesting than "natural causes"! :D

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2010 10:45:24 AM PDT
EdM says:
Glenn R. Smith - There's a problem with taking out "all those morons" [politicians] at once. They came from elsewhere - senators from each state, Congressmen from each district in each state ...

I'm reminded of an old saying, modified a bit here. All the "good" people from earth should be put on a large space ship and sent away from earth. Then, Nuke the earth to cinders to eliminate all the bad people. Then, in case some bad people slipped onto the space ship, nuke the space ship also.

You see, we're all human; all in the same boat. So, if your prayer of a killer asteroid taking out those places came to fruition, just remember that that kind of extinction event would get you, too.

Such a charitable ... It seems that no Good Samaritan resides in your house.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2010 10:56:32 AM PDT
I agree!
Whenever I argue with the wife I keep praying for that asteroid to end this suffering!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2010 11:02:23 AM PDT
No! I am a Good Samaritan.
Unfortunately I'm also prejudiced against certain peoples.
Actually all other people than Americans. And also rich Americans.
Hell to tell the truth I'm dying of cancer and I really don't care about anybody anymore!
I would love to die and take the whole world with me!
Kinda like having a coke!
"I want to teach the world to die and have a coke today"
"It's the REAL thing!"
Oh Happy Days! Oh Happy Days!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2010 11:25:28 AM PDT
stevign says:
lololol.....good one RC.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 28, 2010 4:53:43 PM PDT
Doug says:
Good Luck, Glenn, we're all rooting for ya!

Posted on May 31, 2010 6:54:27 AM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
An unmanned Japanese spacecraft designed to return samples from an asteroid has completed an important step on its journey back to Earth.

http://hayabusa.jaxa.jp/e/index.html

Posted on May 31, 2010 8:37:46 AM PDT
Thanks, Martin! I had forgotten all about this spacecraft. I loved that it used ION engines 7 years ago, and I remember when it touched down on the asteroid to take a sample.

It looks like 2 weeks to go until landing in Australia.

In reply to an earlier post on May 31, 2010 8:50:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 31, 2010 8:51:23 AM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Bob,

"I loved that it used ION engines 7 years ago, and I remember when it touched down on the asteroid to take a sample."

The chemical rocket engine failed in flight, so its ion thrusters have brought it home on a much slower trajectory.

"It looks like 2 weeks to go until landing in Australia."

Yes, the 13th June at the Woomera Test Facility in South Australia. Until the return capsule lands, we won't know if it managed to obtain any material from the Itokawa asteroid.

Posted on May 31, 2010 1:13:53 PM PDT
Popular science had some good articles about this stuff a few years back. I really wish I kept them so I could give you the dates and facts..... One plan included attaching hundreds of motors powered by solar panels.

In reply to an earlier post on May 31, 2010 1:43:55 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Hi Mithridates VI (or do you prefer Eupator Dionysius?),

"One plan included attaching hundreds of motors powered by solar panels."

There are several possible strategies, depending on time to impact and the type of asteroid. The big problem is detection; we know of some asteroids that cross Earth's orbit, but we haven't seen all of them. The programs that might detect a potential impactor don't have full coverage of the sky, and some have been subject to budget cuts.

PS. Watch out for Pompey.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 11:06:37 AM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Hayabusa has landed in the Woomera Prohibited Area in Australia; capsule not yet recovered. Radar tracking and a beacon in the container itself were used by the recovery team to locate the parachute drop-point. The capsule will not be approached until daylight hours to avoid contamination.

http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/topics/2010/hayabusa_obs3.shtml

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 11:22:59 AM PDT
stevign says:
Great advertising gimmick, those Japanese will put "anything" into space.

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.2010hayabusa.com/images/hayabusa-4.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.2010hayabusa.com/&h=768&w=1024&sz=151&tbnid=6zZ54R8Ites5NM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3DHayabusa&hl=en&usg=__D5uc7PYQLDRrQYK7oNFLnRjjk9g=&sa=X&ei=OiEVTJjZNJLOMpuR9bEL&ved=0CCcQ9QEwAw

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 11:59:25 AM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Hayabusa is 'peregrine falcon' in Japanese. In addition to the space probe (and motorcycle) it is also the name of a train and train station, a class of ship in the modern Japanese navy and in the Imperial Japanese Navy, the nickname of a wrestler and some aircraft.

In much the same way, in addition to being a space program, Apollo is also the name of a bicycle, motorcycle, a number of makes of car, ships in the USN and RN etc.

A follow-on mission, Hayabusa-2 has been planned, though there are funding issues.

http://b612.jspec.jaxa.jp/mission/e/hayabusa2_e.html

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 12:31:09 PM PDT
stevign says:
MH:

Are you trying to tell me they sent the ENTIRE Imperial Japanese Navy into space? GOD those guys are good!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 12:48:46 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
stevign,

Only if you believe that the USS Apollo (AS-25) landed on the Moon.... 8-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 12:57:50 PM PDT
stevign says:
MH:

You're the expert, I have no idea.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 1:13:51 PM PDT
stevign:
Yeah!
You know how good the Japanese are making miniatures.
They just mini-sized the Navy and shot it into orbit!
Pretty neat trick. Huh?

Posted on Jun 13, 2010 2:51:00 PM PDT
Ha. Glenn, very funny. Sort of like "Fantastic Voyage"?

Think they could get Raquel Welch to go?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 2:58:27 PM PDT
M. Helsdon says:
Bob,

May like the 1919 classic The Girl in the Golden Atom?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2010 3:37:05 PM PDT
CivWar64 (Bob):
It really doesn't matter to me anymore.
Bladder cancer operation took away my sex life.
So Raquel wouldn't have any purpose.
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  61
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Initial post:  Jan 10, 2010
Latest post:  Jun 24, 2013

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