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In reply to an earlier post on Sep 19, 2012 6:59:54 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
lol

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 19, 2012 7:01:11 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Generators?

Or ala "Thunderdome," pig poop.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 19, 2012 7:30:11 PM PDT
R. Wilde says:
Sounds like we're getting into the plot of that new series "Revolution" here.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 19, 2012 8:11:35 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
I recorded that but haven't watched it yet. Network scifi typically sucks.

Posted on Sep 19, 2012 10:00:16 PM PDT
Yikes! 100 years ago my dad was 10 years old!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2012 5:38:21 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 20, 2012 5:39:21 AM PDT
W.T. says:
I foresee a cataclysm, sadly. Not nuclear war. Not an asteroid. Something far worse. Expansion of the welfare state to the point that most people actually forget how to learn or do anything to help themselves. And when the gadgets break, there will be no one with the knowledge to fix them, or even the drive to try.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2012 1:07:36 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Expounding on your point. Many gadgets aren't really repairable anyway in the old sense. No longer can you replace a vacuum tube or solder in a new resistor. You need spare boards, chips, screens, etc. It really amounts to having full sets of spares to keep gadgets going for years and years.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 21, 2012 4:57:10 AM PDT
>> most people actually forget how to learn or do anything to help themselves. And when the gadgets break, there will be no one with the knowledge to fix them

Sounds like one of the plot threads in Varley's _Millennium_; a great book which became a horrible movie.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 21, 2012 7:44:36 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 21, 2012 7:48:07 AM PDT
W.T. says:
And also several dozen short stories from the pulp days. Technological regression was a common theme in the 1930's in the pulps, for some reason. Kind of a subset of the "post-apocalyptic" genre.

It's also relatively common for sci-fi writers to use technological regression in conjunction with space colonies. Colonists are dropped off and either lack the skills or the desire to continue their tech, so they regress back to more primitive days. It's always been a convenient way to explain humans on other worlds, and to tell low-tech stories in a non-earth setting.

Posted on Sep 25, 2012 4:18:17 AM PDT
I always wondered what the "second world" was:
http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/third_world_countries.htm

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 25, 2012 5:29:18 AM PDT
W.T. says:
The First World - Western Civilization
The Second World - The Socialist East
The Third World - Developing Countries
The Fourth World - The genius that is Jack Kirby.

Posted on Sep 25, 2012 12:09:41 PM PDT
J. Beaver says:
At exactly what point does rotten milk become cheese?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 25, 2012 12:56:44 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Generally speaking, I would consider the process that results in cheese to be different from 'rotting'.

However, this crosses the line: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu

Posted on Sep 25, 2012 1:16:48 PM PDT
Yack!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 25, 2012 1:29:06 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
It's worse than it sounds (or looks).

Posted on Sep 27, 2012 2:02:12 PM PDT
What determines if a baby is born bald or with a full head of hair?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 2:05:00 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Its dependent upon the number of protein rinses they receive during gestation.

Posted on Sep 27, 2012 2:10:03 PM PDT
J. Beaver says:
Why do people always congregate in doorways, effectively blocking them?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 2:12:21 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Brownian motion

Posted on Sep 27, 2012 4:37:12 PM PDT
The same thing happens when people are in kitchens--if there's a choke point people will always congregate there.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 10:09:50 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
Well, that would be sad. I'd say if we get that far, its time (long over due, perhaps) to let go of the gadgets and just let them fade away.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 10:10:28 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
Interesting truth that. The very nature of having to learn how to repair gadgets and be dependent on them is sort of a clue. I know its nice all this warmth and shelter away from the cold, dark and lonely universe, but maybe the type of isolation modernity provides isn't what's best for us?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 10:15:48 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
Jack was the single most influential figure in the turnaround in Marvel's fortunes from the time he rejoined the company ... It wasn't merely that Jack conceived most of the characters that are being done, but ... Jack's point of view and philosophy of drawing became the governing philosophy of the entire publishing company and, beyond the publishing company, of the entire field ... [Marvel took] Jack and use[d] him as a primer. They would get artists ... and they taught them the ABCs, which amounted to learning Jack Kirby. ... Jack was like the Holy Scripture and they simply had to follow him without deviation. That's what was told to me ... It was how they taught everyone to reconcile all those opposing attitudes to one single master point of view.[65]

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Kirby

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2012 10:17:11 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
The term originated with a remark by Mbuto Milando, first secretary of the Tanzanian High Commission, in conversation with George Manuel, Chief of the National Indian Brotherhood of Canada. Milando stated that "When Native peoples come into their own, on the basis of their own cultures and traditions, that will be the Fourth World."[2] [3]

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_World

Posted on Sep 27, 2012 10:26:12 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
What is the Zeroth World?

Well, the movie "The Decline of Western Civilization" comes to mind:

The film's title is possibly a reference to famous music critic Lester Bangs' 1970 two-part review of The Stooges' Fun House for Creem magazine, where Bangs quotes a friend who had said the popularity of The Stooges signaled "the decline of Western civilization". Another possibility is that the title refers to Darby Crash's reading of Oswald Spengler's Der Untergang des Abendlandes (The Decline of the West).[2]

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Decline_of_Western_Civilization

According to the theory, the Western world is actually ending and we are witnessing the last season - "winter time" - of the Faustian civilization. In Spengler's depiction Western Man is a proud but tragic figure, for, while he strives and creates, he secretly knows the actual goal will never be reached.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Decline_of_the_West
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  24
Total posts:  287
Initial post:  Aug 29, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 19, 2013

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