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Posted on Jan 7, 2011 4:47:36 AM PST
http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/01/lockheed-p791-hybrid-air-vehicle.html#more

Speaking of new blimpy-aircraft, this article from today's Next Big Future is titled LOCKHEED'S P791 HYBRID AIR VEHICLES AND OTHER RELATED VEHICLES

Posted on Jan 7, 2011 7:47:49 AM PST
Ron...Links that work. LOL! And I don't even test them!

I can painfully sound out Russian, like that this is "techno-fantasy" (actually looks more steampunky to me), but another thing I found really cool that I just discovered is that, if you bring this page up in Google Chrome, there is a translate button that will auto-translate the whole page, and putting your mouse over any of the English will pop up the original Russian.

The guy who did this is pretty talented, I have to say.

Posted on Jan 7, 2011 11:16:55 PM PST
The best use of Google translations I've seen is in Second Life, the virtual reality world simulator. I run into non-English speaking people there sometimes, and whatever they type in their native language is then quickly repeated in English via the instant Google translator in real-time. It's almost like Star Trek's universal translator, but text-only.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2011 8:20:37 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
"LOL! And I don't even test them!"

ZING! Thing is, though, NEITHER DOES SHE! LOL!

Until after she has posted them, that is! Ha ha!

I like going old school on things first, just to see how much I can read/figure out on my own. ;)

Joseph, Google Translate is pretty good, but the quality falls off pretty fast for non-European, less "popular" languages. The Japanese can be pretty spotty, and the Arabic is terrible. Always remember the grain of salt. ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2011 8:25:39 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
Document title from URL: lockheed-p791-hybrid-air-vehicle.html

Marilyn's helpful "summary"(?)/comment:
"Speaking of new blimpy-aircraft, this article from today's Next Big Future is titled LOCKHEED'S P791 HYBRID AIR VEHICLES AND OTHER RELATED VEHICLES"

REALLY?! Is that the title?! I would never have guessed! Sheesh.

What's the matter, Marilyn, feeling left out after your snafu with "airgoers"? LOL.

If you can't read the things and make an intelligent comment, WHY BOTHER?!

Posted on Jan 8, 2011 11:48:29 AM PST
I was just looking at those linked blimp videos again and they're really impressive, especially the second one on the page showing one with G-OHAV written on it's side. It looked surprisingly agile in the air. These aren't the super cool airships I was thinking of though...I saw concept drawings a while back for something much larger and I think, triangular in shape, with a huge cargo bay that could hold tons of cargo.
That P791 is cool too, but the cockpit interior reminds me of a go-cart or dune buggy. Does that thing even have a cargo hold? It didn't look like it from the video.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2011 1:11:52 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 8, 2011 1:13:49 PM PST
M. Helsdon says:
"I was just looking at those linked blimp videos again and they're really impressive, especially the second one on the page showing one with G-OHAV written on it's side."

It's an unmanned, long-endurance, medium-altitude vehicle developed by Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAC), selected for the Long Endurance Multi-intelligence Vehicle (LEMV) programme.

"I saw concept drawings a while back for something much larger and I think, triangular in shape, with a huge cargo bay that could hold tons of cargo."

CargoLifter went bust and their main hangar at Krausnick was redeveloped as a... leisure center.

"That P791 is cool too, but the cockpit interior reminds me of a go-cart or dune buggy. Does that thing even have a cargo hold?"

There aren't any specifics available at the moment but it is closely related to SkyKitten built by Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), and SkyCat 15 was intended to lift a 15-tonne load. ATG went bust but SkyCat development has been continued by HAC, and allegedly some HAC engineers were involved in the P791. P791 looks to be a basic 'proof-of-concept' vehicle so probably doesn't have a significant payload capability.

Posted on Jan 8, 2011 2:17:45 PM PST
Speaking of translation, I remember reading that the Gov't was looking for a field deployable speech translator for the military.
Here is a slightly different story that is related->
Military seeks one bad-ass universal speech translator
DARPA wants technology that can listen to speech, detect key words and identify the speaker in degraded communication lines.
http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/57633

Interestingly, back in the late 1980s/early 1990s, some of the researchers I worked with were involved with a DARPA challenge for a computer program to eaves-drop on phone conversations to listen in for certain key words (bomb, terrorism, etc.) which would then switch over the phone call to a human eaves-dropper who could determine if something nefarious was going on. Now, 20 years later, note the "degraded comm lines" bit. I wonder if they are trying to listen in on Taliban guys transmitting on radio signals degraded in the mountains, even though the article says it will help guys watching news programs in other languages?

Posted on Jan 12, 2011 12:13:04 PM PST
BTW, Dr. Michio Kaku's Kindle version of his "Physics of the Impossible" book is now only $1.99. I just picked it up since I really like his TV specials.
Link->
Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel

Posted on Jan 18, 2011 4:31:50 AM PST
http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/01/new-type-of-entanglement-allows.html#more

NEW TYPE OF ENTANGLEMENT ALLOWS "TELEPORTATION IN TIME" (MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2011 7:14:41 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
And what are the implications of this news, Marilyn?

(You never post any comments on this stuff because you can't. But kudos for dragging in the links! That's really...what was your word?... Ah, yes: PRODUCTIVE! LOL.)

Posted on Jan 18, 2011 10:20:46 AM PST
Well, at least this "teleportation" was interesting.
Here is a MUCH better link though, explaining what they are thinking in more detail-> http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/26270/

BUT -- this is merely conjecture. They haven't "discovered" anything. They've made it up. The concept is simple -- I could have made it up too. In fact, from the article:
"Neither is it clear exactly how such an experiment might be done ... "

Of course, this is how good science should work. They look at concepts, make up an idea, but the next step is to TEST IT OUT. So, nothing on the horizon yet.

Posted on Jan 19, 2011 3:44:48 PM PST
Thanks for your comments, Bob. Even if this version of "teleportation" is still just a thought-experiment, it's exciting that people at MIT are working on it.

Maybe these links will be more to your liking. We all know solar power is constained by its lack-of-storage ability. But someone is doing something exciting with a "reactor" to convert sunlight to more useable fuel.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/01/reactor-for-producing-fuel-from.html#more
REACTOR FOR PRODUCING FUEL FROM SUNLIGHT

And here's another cutting-edge idea for producing electricity:
http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/01/nanocrystals-of-rock-salt-into-lead.html#more
NANO-CRYSTALS OF ROCK SALT INTO LEAD TELLURIDE CREATE BREAKTHROUGH THERMO ELECTRIC POWER

Posted on Jan 19, 2011 3:56:45 PM PST
getalife says:
How hard would it be to teleport Marilyn?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 19, 2011 4:24:42 PM PST
Ronald Craig says:
(Depends on how far you want to send her. The center of the Moon would be a bit of a stretch, but the center of the Gulf, not too hard.)

"But someone is doing something exciting with a "reactor" to convert sunlight to more useable fuel."

A reactor is any container or device in which substances are added together to react chemically; it doesn't just mean nuclear reactors. I suspect that your use of quotes shows you didn't know that. The sort of detail that sets toads jumping for joy. :)

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 8:45:44 AM PST
Marilyn,

Nope, those links didn't do it for me. But, I did always wonder if Telluride, Colorado was named for the chemical (Tellurium).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2011 10:58:30 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
Wikipedia says... Yeyusssss!

"Telluride was originally named 'Columbia', but due to confusion with Columbia, California, the name was changed by the post office in 1887. The town was named after the chemical element tellurium, a metalloid element which forms compounds known as tellurides. Although tellurium was never actually found in the mountains of Telluride, it is sometimes associated with deposits of gold and silver. Telluride's mines were rich in zinc, lead, copper, silver, and, of course, gold."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telluride,_Colorado#Mining_days

(Ever see the show Little Britain? I think I just channeled the crazy Scottish innkeeper. :o)

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 11:43:56 AM PST
I find this stuff very interesting. My book Cloud Crash: A Cal Stevens Novel is all about these near-future technologies that are plausible, present now in some form, and maybe a little dangerous.

My favorite near future item, however, is probably ubiquitous internet. In less than 20 years, the US will probably have universally accessible broadband everywhere there's cell service. It creates a lot of possibilities and productivity.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 20, 2011 12:17:39 PM PST
M. Helsdon says:
Philip,

"all about these near-future technologies that are plausible, present now in some form, and maybe a little dangerous."

Whilst some future technological applications can be predicted, often something arises that was completely unexpected. Look at 50s science fiction, and how computers were often seen as room-sized, or even Blade Runner - The Final Cut (Two-Disc Special Edition), which predicted many things that are still futuristic such as replicants (advanced cloning and genetic engineering) and flying cars (maybe possible) but didn't include mobile 'phones - Deckard has to use a 'phone booth in a bar, for instance.

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 12:35:03 PM PST
The demise of phone booths has me wondering: what's poor Clark Kent going to do?

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 3:41:46 PM PST
Sailor B:

"The demise of phone booths has me wondering: what's poor Clark Kent going to do?"
Wasn't there a scene in one of the Superman movies where he goes to an open-air phone booth, hesitates, then goes somewhere else? I can't remember the exact scene.

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 4:49:49 PM PST
Figured I would beat Marilyn to the punch:
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-01/italian-scientists-claim-dubious-cold-fusion-breakthrough

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 7:53:54 PM PST
Yes. that would be Superman's first public appearance in 1978's "Superman: The Movie." If I remember correctly, he used a revolving door.

So my joke is a couple of decades out of date, but hey.

Posted on Jan 20, 2011 9:43:36 PM PST
Ah, yes, now that you said it, I remember it too. He sped through the revolving door really quickly so that you couldn't see him change.

Though, spinning the Earth backwards to reverse time was very very lame. What idiot in Hollywood thought that made sense? They must have gotten that from the old 1930s/40s comics??

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 21, 2011 12:52:20 AM PST
Ronald Craig says:
Can't blame that one on my favorite whipping boy, but I bet he thought it was super ultra-kewl!

(I wonder if he put it in one of the two Superman novels he's written recently?! Hmmm...)
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  44
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Initial post:  Jul 29, 2010
Latest post:  Aug 31, 2013

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