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Star Wars acquired by Disney - Episode 7 green-lighted for 2015


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Showing 51-75 of 80 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012 6:19:07 PM PST
Brian Foster says:
ABSOLUTELY RIGHT!!!

Posted on Nov 5, 2012 5:50:17 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
This is interesting..

George Lucas Will Donate Disney $4 Billion To Education
Posted: 11/02/2012
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/02/george-lucas-donate-4-billion_n_2067145.html?utm_hp_ref=impact

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 5:52:59 AM PST
W.T. says:
So he's only keeping the 0.05 in the reported sale amount?

Posted on Nov 5, 2012 3:42:44 PM PST
Awesome

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 4:17:55 PM PST
R. Wilde says:
Could be worse... can you imagine if Disney got hold of the Indiana Jones franchise? First thing they'd do would be an Indiana Jones/ Hannah Montana crossover.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 4:27:04 PM PST
The horror.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 6:32:40 PM PST
Couldn't be worse than Crystal Skull.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 7:39:28 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 5, 2012 7:46:23 PM PST
Byron says:
I think the key to new Star Wars movies is "keep it simple". The original trilogy was a riff on serials from the '40s. The second trilogy went wrong by taking itself too seriously and becoming needlessly complex. While many hardcore SW fans hope for lots of references to the expanded storylines and characters from original novels and such, the average moviegoer would be baffled or bored by it.

If they want most viewers to say "Now THAT'S Star Wars!" they need to stick to straightforward plots with lots of action, basic humor, melodrama and likable characters. Star Wars was never meant to be hard sci-fi, heavily philosophical or political. Endless Jedi Council meetings, Senatorial wranglings and heavy-handed parallels to the fall of the Weimar Republic were definitely not in the stripped-down spirit of the original trilogy. There's also not much at stake in numerous action scenes where Jedis do nothing but chop down never-ending hordes of robots.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 7:51:59 PM PST
thanks... I had managed to forget all about that. ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 7:57:03 PM PST
Hayden Christensen fail

His acting was so bad it felt like the Force was being sucked out of my body simply by watching the movies.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012 5:45:51 AM PST
B. A. Dilger says:
Byron----You're right. "Star Wars" was conceived for the mass audience, is not scifi purism. Yet it had a core message of Resistence to injustice and oppression. With all the 1,000,000,000's of dollars spent for the rights by Disney they'll want to see a return on their investment. And this is a global economy now, where it isn't in the interest of global corporations to antagonize certain governments that could mean profit. The original message of Star Wars becomes an embarrassment to movie profiteers. I only hope that the characters we remember why they were so successful in the rebellion against The Empire, who now owns their IP rights.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012 6:19:54 PM PST
C. J. Vasta says:
Joss said the Avengers was very physically exhausting for him. He may not want to take on another high pressure project.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 2:22:43 PM PST
Brent Butler says:
The Indiana Jones franchise was part of the deal too.

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 2:27:31 PM PST
Seems to me that being in the spotlight on a problematic Disney movie is a good way to shorten one's career.

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 2:47:49 PM PST
Brent Butler says:
It's hard to imagine a Star Wars movie becoming problematic. Even the worst of the previous six made plenty of money, and the franchise has been well rested, twice. The Pirates movies were entertaining and successful, and aren't a lot different from "Star Wars on the High Seas". There are plenty of talented writers and directors around who can do big time action/sci fi.

I liked John Carter a lot. It gave me a good sense of the ERB books if not the strict story line (and what movie ever delivers that anyway?). I didn't think that property probably had the built in fandom to guarantee a big theater audience, and sadly that turned out to be the case. I'd have liked to see more of those. I liked what they did with the Therns, and think that ERB would have approved of that concept. Of course ERB basically approved of whatever made a buck. He unabashedly admitted that he wrote pulp to make a living. He made no pretense that he was creating art. LOL

With a four billion dollar investment without a minute of film in the can, you can be sure that Disney is not going to take these properties lightly. From what I've read they are going to recast Luke, Leia, and Han. That's been done before, most notably in the Star Trek reboot, and that didn't turn out so badly. If the actors do a good job, they'll eventually win over doubting fans.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:00:36 PM PST
I bought the Star Trek reboot BR and watched it once. I did not like real Spock and the overused time travel crap. I dealt with the rehashed crew, but I would have rather seen how the Feds first met the Romulans or Klingons or something like that.

That is what we need with Star Trek. Fresh air. There are plenty of stories out there without having to go back to Luke and his gang.

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 7:36:29 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 7:36:41 PM PST
Brent Butler says:
Actually, first contact with Romulans and Klingons was covered in TOS (Balance of Terror), and in the Enterprise pilot. I think in your second paragraph you meant to type "Star Wars". For those of use who have kept up with the expansion of that story through books, you'd be absolutely correct. For the rest of the public that they want to fill theater seats, they'd sell a lot fewer tickets if they don't have familiar names among the characters.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 7:06:26 AM PST
W.T. says:
Luke, Han and Leia were not familiar names until they were familiar names.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 12:54:39 PM PST
Brent Butler says:
You have a good point, but there is a reason why they didn't swap out the main characters wholesale when they did Empire and Jedi. ;-) Even the prequels had characters in common. I think they would put money at risk, for example, going into left fields to make a series of dedicated Rogue Squadron movies. Most of the books out are about the main characters from the first trilogy. That illustrates where the demand lies.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 1:04:18 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 1:09:16 PM PST
Byron says:
Harrison Ford is now saying he might be up for future Star Wars movies. Even though he is older than Han Solo should be in most future plot scenarios, I have a feeling that they would be willing to modify the plot in order to include Hamill, Ford or Fisher and make the main protagonists the children (or grandchildren at this point) of the original trio. If they recast any of those three actors the movie won't have the same visceral punch or a feeling of direct connection to the original trilogy.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 5:53:47 AM PST
W.T. says:
Agreed. Star Was is a generational saga, so it would make sense to have the next trilogy to skip to the next generation, but with clear and direct ties to Luke, Leia and Han.

My other concern is whether they will try to maintain the EU continuity, even if they don't directly refer to it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 6:47:29 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 7:09:19 AM PST
Maybe to get around the EU continuity issue they could skip to Cade Skywalker and maybe have Luke show up as ghost like Obi-Wan.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 9:13:00 AM PST
That is what I could see happening. Cameos for the old stars.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 10:21:36 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 10:22:06 AM PST
W.T. says:
The other thing is that for the new movies with "Episode x" titles, they really do have to work to build on the overarching story in some way. For future movies that are not tagged as episodes of the main saga, then there should be more creative freedom.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 3:38:58 PM PST
M. Carole says:
As long as they don't re-cast Luke Skywalker and then have him going to a remote planet and meeting up with a future incarnation of Han Solo. That defies the laws of probability and no writing team should ever require that kind of suspension of disbelief out of their die hard fan base...oh, wait, nevermind. My mistake.
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  80
Initial post:  Oct 30, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 21, 2012

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