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OLD CODGERS READING BACK IN TIME


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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 11:29:43 PM PDT
Funny--I'm surprised that "Pop" hasn't shown up here on this thread--or any others recently. I'm starting to worry---"POP! HEY POP! WHERE ARE YOU?"

Think he heard me?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2008 10:57:13 AM PDT
Yes, Gilbert, I've been a member of SFBC off and on (I used to get kicked out for not returning cards) for 30 years or more. I do remember seeing the Grimes books once but haven't looked to see if they are still available. I should do that. I put off the Barry Hughart omnibus with Number 10 Ox and they dropped it. It's coming out again in October (I think) from someone else.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2008 10:00:37 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 7, 2008 10:03:30 PM PDT
Angelicat says:
Steven, I had a similar reaction to a recent re-read of Sranger In A Strange Land. I didn't even completely finish it. The older I got, the less it appealed to me. I think I just started understanding it (and its subtexts, both obvious and subliminal) a lot better as an adult. An old codger of 56 if you must know ;-)

There are two Heinlein books that I really like, and interestingly, the first also has a similar female stereotype as those in SIASL. Yet I like it a lot better. That book is Farnham's Freehold, one of my top ten post-apocalypse/alternate reality reads. It was pretty controversial when first published for reasons that don't become obvious until you are well into the book. I highly recommend it.

The other one is more whimsical, has a tad more science stuff in it. It's called "The Door Into Summer." I first became familiar with it as a short story in a collection, then some time later discovered the novel itself. I enjoy it too - though it ALSO has slightly questionable male/female dynamics ;-)

catherine

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2008 11:30:54 PM PDT
David Allen says:
I'm a young codger (40) who has always been a fan of the pulp proto-super-heroes like Doc Savage, the Shadow, and my all-time favorite, The Avenger. I have been spending a lot of time on the Dr. Hermes reviews site (look up Dr. Hermes). It seems to be run some guy with a LOT of time on his hands for reading old pulp novels, whether they are crime, sci-fi, horror, what have you. A lot of fun.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 5:09:49 PM PDT
Zack G.C. says:
This looks like a rather good spot for a "youngling" to get good recommendations from codgers...
Old books I have read: Farenheit 451/uncountable other Bradbury stories, 1984, H.G. Wells books, Jules Verne books, and I was heading towards Burroughs "She" sometime in the near future...

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 6:15:04 PM PDT
Didn't Rider Haggard write "She?"

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:23:07 PM PDT
E. Hynes says:
I'll be 60 in a few weeks and have started doing the same thing. Someone on this list just identified a title for me that I read when I was around 12 or 13 -- early 1960s. I'm doing it largely just for the fun of it. There's something very appealing about the tone of a lot of older stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:42:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 8, 2008 7:43:44 PM PDT
Off topic for moment--Why are clapped out old cars called "beaters?"
Ed--who identified which novel? We need to know so one of us can walk around with a mylar balloon that says "Yay for Me!!"

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:45:27 PM PDT
E. Hynes says:
You might also like Wylie's Tomorrow. It's an earlier WWIII novel, written in 1950s. Mainly bombers with A-bombs rather ICBMs with H-bombs, so it's not total destruction.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 7:56:27 PM PDT
E. Hynes says:
Gil,
Sorry, I lost track of which discussion I was in (aging brain no doubt). It was someone named Lee Kuivinen who isn't in this discussion; he responded to question I posted and identified a novel, Across Time, based on a rather hazy description from me.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 8:11:47 PM PDT
Cherisaruss says:
Yes , Rider Haggard wrote "She." Maybe he's thinking of A Princess of Mars, which I just started re-reading when I ran across it while cleaning up Mom's old stash of Sci-Fi. She gave me my very first Poul Anderson....Brain Wave. *note to self: try to find this one* I've re-read City and the Stars many times over the years. Still sounds good to me. Don't forget Theodore Sturgeon, folks....I love R.A. Lafferty and Phillip K. Dick, Asimov, Niven...goodness! Y'all really got me going. And now my daughter has me hooked on her fantasy authors. *so many books, so little....*

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 8:15:59 PM PDT
Cherisaruss says:
Catherine, you are so right about Heinlein.....old bald headed fart with lush young females lusting after him in book after book....oh, my. I agree with your assessments of the others. I also loved Podkayne of Mars when I was a kid.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 8:36:30 PM PDT
E. Hynes says:
I loved older Heinlein but IMHO he did better within the constraints of the 40s and 50s (although the Door Into Summer really is pretty kinky). Alas, when he started writing about sex...well, as you say, "old bald headed fart with lush young femals". I think his only adult sounding male-female relationship is in a fantasy short story from the 1950s--title is something like "The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag".

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 8:54:07 PM PDT
Zack G.C. says:
Yes, I was confused... I was thinking of She, just wrong author.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 9:04:51 PM PDT
Grant says:
I find that some things that I read in the 70s have gotten better on re reading now that I'm older. I recently reread some Harry Harrison stuff like Stainless Steel Rat and Technicolor Time Machine and enjoyed them even more now. The same with reprinted pulp stories like The Shadow and Doc Savage and Domino Lady. As a kid I collected them, but didnt particularly care for the stories. Now I read them and really get a kick out of them now that I've grown patient enough to enjoy the writing style.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 24, 2008 4:11:48 PM PDT
sbissell3 says:
Just finished Theodore Sturgeon's 'More Than Human.' It won the International Fantasy Award in 1953 and has at least been nominated for a 'Retro' Hugo. It is actually 3 short stories made into a single novel. Sturgeon was kind of an odd writer. If you check some of his bio you will also see 'Some of Your Blood,' a very strange vampire novel which is seldom read any more. 'More Than Human' continues to sell and I think was last published in 1998. Sturgeon only published 6 novels under his pen name (real name was Edward Hamilton Waldo) but I've heard rumors about there being other Sturgeon novels out there.

Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 24, 2008 9:50:23 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 24, 2008 9:51:36 PM PDT
Yes--Sturgeon wrote "I, Libertine" as Frederick R. Ewing. It's slugline is "Turbulent! Turgid! Tempestuous!"(Bantam 1956) It has a great cover by Kelly Freas. At Abe books it's almost $58!!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 25, 2008 6:42:51 AM PDT
I'm another nostalgia nut. When I was a kid (under 10), I read books like SPACE CAT VISITS VENUS by Ruthven Todd and THE WONDERFUL FLIGHT TO THE MUSHROOM PLANET by Eleanor Cameron, and lots of comic books. A couple of years later, I was reading R. A. Heinlein and Andre Norton, plus THE SECRET OF THE MARTIAN MOONS by Donald A. Wollheim, PEBBLE IN THE SKY by Asimov, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY by Arthur C. Clarke, SPACEMEN, GO HOME by Milton Lesser, THE UNIVERSE BETWEEN by Alan E. Nourse, ACROSS TIME by David Grinnell, and, would you believe, THE MATHEMATICAL MAGPIE edited by Clifton Fadiman and THE BEST FROM FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION, TENTH SERIES, edited by Robert P. Mills? Every once in a while I reread one of those books I remember fondly, while the newer books I read tend to be nonfiction.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 25, 2008 6:59:29 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
Gilbert,
It is outrageous! Amazon has one for US$65 and the cheapest on Alibris is US$100! I never read it, is it any good? Plot? Is it SciFi or what?
Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 25, 2008 8:38:26 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 25, 2008 10:00:14 PM PDT
SFonly says:
Even though I seem to be a youngster at 45, I can fully identify with this post. I can remember when I was a grade school kid and read my first Novel. It was Armageddon 2419 A.D. Lately I have been buying every copy of that book I can find. I have gone back and tore through novels that I read when I was much younger and am enjoying them as much or more now than I did then. Mockingbird by Walter Tevis is another great classic that comes to mind. Also, I just got done rereading Mission of Gravity by Hal Clement and thought to myself - They just don't make novels fun anymore. The timeless tone and spirit of the classics just seems to outdo the techno party of today's scifi. A good story will always keep you coming back.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 25, 2008 10:58:51 PM PDT
Here here! I was talking with a friend the other day and he was commenting on the obsolite advanced technology spoken of in one of the books I had lent him. I told him when I run into a situation like that my mind just kicks in and pictures some alternate yet wonderous replacement or even just suspends what I know as reality and pictures it as an alternate reality. The imagination is a fantastic thing. It lets a really good story play out through almost any outdating situation.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 25, 2008 11:21:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 25, 2008 11:22:13 PM PDT
Steven J. Bissell says:
Gilbert,
It is outrageous! Amazon has one for US$65 and the cheapest on Alibris is US$100! I never read it, is it any good? Plot? Is it SciFi or what?
Steven

I never read it, but from the cover it takes place in the 18th century, possibly in France.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2008 7:24:06 AM PDT
sbissell3 says:
Gilbert,
There was a copy of 'I, Libertine' on eBay yesterday that sold for US$22. According to the blurb on it and from what I can find, Theodore Sturgeon and Jean Shepherd wrote it as a 'hoax.' It was suppose to be a parody of those 'naughty' novels of the 1800s. Interesting, but not enough for me to pay that much for. I'll keep an eye out for it in used book stores. If I can get it for a few bucks I'll give it a shot.
Steven

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2008 11:53:14 AM PDT
B. A. Dilger says:
Hey Ya'll--just found you. As an avid reader of scifi AND a member of SFBC, I have only this year tried to rebuild my scifi collection. After reading thousands of novels, novellas, short stories, this is the comfort I have stored in my mind despite the loss of my First Collection in the mid-'90's. It was six boxes that, along with many more boxes of books, were donated to my local college's library book sale, and found homes elsewhere. I could no longer store them, I am sorry...I am quoted elsewhere as declaring Asimov's "Foundation Trilogy" as the single most important book for scifi collection. After that the field is broad...Though versed in a variety of scifi genres, hard scifi is my preference. I read many works that I couldn't in the least understand, but that didn't stop me from reading on...Scifi has had a considerable influence on how I perceive "reality." And the authorities of this world do not expect you to have an imagination after you "grow-up"...Fans of space opera can find a new short story collection out-"Galactic Empires." Some challenge but nothing an old (in the positive sense) scifi reader couldn't handle (six authors). -B

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2008 2:27:00 PM PDT
Hey Lee, Space Cat got me started, too! I don't remember Visits Venus but there was a Space Cat and Kittens. I mentioned it in a different thread and thought folks would think it odd, but, then again, at 7 I wasn't ready for Lucky Starr yet.
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  146
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Initial post:  Aug 2, 2008
Latest post:  May 10, 2014

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