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In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2012 5:26:29 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 28, 2012 5:27:34 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Agreed about Kirby....he did EVERYTHING for those early Marvel classics except write the credits...and as far as I'm concerned, Stan Lee is the most reprehensible human being on the planet. Still to this day stealing credit for the work of true geniuses, not only Jack Kirby but also Steve Ditko with Spider-Man.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2012 6:22:41 AM PDT
Nova137 says:
You have studied comic book history, eh?! Cool. Not a topic of study that comes up much!

I read and collected some comics in my day. I was a huge fan of the Hulk. The Hulk movies were just ok with Eric Bana. I didn't see the one with Ed Norton. I was young enough to watch the Lou Ferrigno/Bill Bixby t.v. series and like it!

I liked Superman, but being the man of steel, if Kryptonite wasn't present, you knew he couldn't lose, so he wasn't much fun (unless you like "cheat codes" to put it into modern gaming parlance!).

I loved the Flash. I was a fast runner.... There is something I learned about his abilities that I didn't know then, but can't remember it now (I learned it on these threads, too, about 3 years ago). Something incredible. A quick read of Wiki on the Flash reveals nothing special to my mind right now. I did note that the Flash beat Superman "in Adventures of Superman #463". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_(comics)#Powers_and_abilities

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2012 8:06:59 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 28, 2012 8:08:26 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Yes, Flash has long been a favorite of mine, along with Green Lantern. I especially liked their silver age versions (which I understand have come back in new, slightly-modernized forms).

The coolest thing about the Silver-Age Flash was that, while Superman was about as fast as him, he also had almost complete control over his molecules. He could vibrate each molecule of his body so that he could slip between the empty space of solid objects, effectively "walking through walls". He could be essentially atomized and still be able to will his molecules to reform. By the time I stopped reading new comics, they had introduced the concept of a universal "speed force" that the Flash and other super-speedsters drew their energy from, but that always seemed clumsy and unnecessary to me.

The driving force behind the classic Flash stories was the editor, Julie Schwartz, who had previously been an editor for pulp sci-fi magazines. When the pulps began to die, Schwartz moved to comics, and brought several notable sci-fi authors with him (most notably, Alfred Bester, who had previously written one of the most important novels in sci-fi history, "The Stars, My Destination"). Although the author of most of the classic "Flash" stories, John Broome, did not have a prose pedigree like some of the others, he nontheless brought a scientific sensibility to his stories (which were almost always accurate in scientific theory, but with a lot of imagination applied to the application, let's say...). And artist Carmine Infantino is another one of the all-time greats. He was the first Silver-Age Flash artist in 1958, and he was the last one, in 1985, taking a long break in the middle to actually run DC Comics in the seventies, and then to abruptly move over to Marvel Comics for a while, where he drew the now-legendary "Star Wars" monthly comic, in addition to other projects.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2012 9:25:20 AM PDT
Nova137 says:
W K says: he also had almost complete control over his molecules. He could vibrate each molecule of his body so that he could slip between the empty space of solid objects, effectively "walking through walls". He could be essentially atomized and still be able to will his molecules to reform

Nova137 says: Actually, this is the tidbit from 3 years ago I found fascinating! When I read what it says in the Wiki article, it didn't really sound the same. But you brought it to light just like someone before. Perhaps it was you?! Have you been posting stuff like this on Amazon since 2009? Thanks for the info!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 28, 2012 10:26:19 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Well, I do't recall doing so, but I can't rule it out either.

I recall one issue circa 1980 when a villain vaporized Flash's body using the legendary Philosopher's Stone, effectively turning him into a cloud of water vapor. Flash used his molecular control to make the cloud rain, which converted him back to liquid water, with each drop centering around a minute particle of solid matter (as all raindrops are in the real world). The rain and particle matter reformed into his natural body, essentially "raining" him back into existence. The science involved here was a bit overly imaginative, but the visual was pretty wild.

This also strongly implied that Flash's consciousness was not truly tied to his body anymore, the way most people's are. He could think independently of his human brain, which did not technically exist when he was vaporized.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 29, 2012 5:51:45 PM PDT
Nova137 says:
"Hulk! 'Smash!'"

Just watched the Avengers. The Hulk was amazing throwing Loki around like a rag-doll!

Good movie.

Did you see it, W K?

Posted on Sep 30, 2012 10:49:01 PM PDT
Could a giant use a cello for a violin? And speaking of violins, does anyone know what the violin piece at the 45 min mark of "666 Park Avenue" was on October 30?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 30, 2012 11:43:04 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Be sure to watch "The Avenger's" to the very end of the credits. I didn't do that when I saw it in the theater, but I did on the video.

The first time I saw it the actor who asked Banner if he was an alien looked familiar to me. The second time I watched it I recognized who he was. Anyone else catch it? Easy one if you were paying attention.

Of course, Stan Lee has a cameo, but that one is too easy...

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 30, 2012 11:45:00 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Broomstick? I got nothing. I even went to Imdb.

Posted on Oct 1, 2012 2:26:11 AM PDT
It was Harry Dean Stanton. I caught it.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2012 5:37:22 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 1, 2012 5:38:05 AM PDT
W.T. says:
The Avengers was a lot of fun. It was basically a comic-book brought to life. It may have been the first time that the actual "feel" of a superhero comic was translated the the big screen successfully without changing stuff just for fears of it coming across as "campy". I'm glad they did it like they did instead of trying to make it more "high brow" like the Dark Knight movies, which are excellently, even brilliantly done, but not all that much fun really.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2012 7:30:40 AM PDT
Nova137 says:
Nice observation. Hadn't thought of it like that. I loved Downey-Jr. He made me laugh the most. I laughed good, fun laughs in this one, yes.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2012 7:31:53 AM PDT
Nova137 says:
Dang. I returned it already! I recognized the actor right away. I don't know what Stan Lee looks like.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2012 7:54:17 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 1, 2012 7:54:40 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Yes, Robert Downey, Jr. has found his defining character in Tony Stark. I hope he ends up making a dozen movies playing the character (and with this new "shared movie universe" concept, it might happen).

Posted on Oct 1, 2012 1:12:48 PM PDT
Let's hope he stays in shape and doesn't "bulk out" like Val Kilmer!

Posted on Oct 9, 2012 6:10:25 PM PDT
Just thought this thread needed bumping.
I can see how you can get "Jack" from "John," "Bill" from "William," and "Bob" from "Robert,"
"Betty/Betsy" from "Elizabeth," but how do you get "Peggy" from "Margaret?"

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2012 7:30:26 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
One time I asked a fairly famous dude from Taiwan why he picked Andrew as his Westernized name, and he said it was because "it sounds like Hungyee".

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 10, 2012 5:35:39 PM PDT
R. Wilde says:
Peggy:

Meaning & History
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.

http://www.behindthename.com/name/peggy

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 10, 2012 8:15:07 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Bump. For what it's worth, there's some evidence that English back in ye day had a fairly strong tendency to jam words together, like the familiar contraction "I'm" for "I am". Anyway, an "m" at the end of a word would kind of seamlessly fuse into an "m" at the beginning of the next word, this might encourage people to change the second 'm' so that when someone answered the question "What's your name?", "I'm Molly" didn't sound too much like "Emily". Why they picked 'p', who is knowing, but it would provide a good point of articulation even if the speaker jammed them together as in "jump".

Posted on Oct 10, 2012 8:50:47 PM PDT
I've wondered about that for literally decades.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 11, 2012 5:19:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 11, 2012 5:20:12 AM PDT
W.T. says:
The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.

####

Apparently, at one time it was fashionable to have rhyming nicknames. That's how Richard (Rick) became Dick, how Robert (Rob) became Bob, and how Margaret (Meggy) became Peggy.

Posted on Oct 12, 2012 3:27:47 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
Why is nature self-organizing?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2012 3:54:47 PM PDT
This guy makes sense:
http://masi.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notebooks/self-organization.html/

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2012 4:22:23 PM PDT
Old Rocker says:
I'll watch that later when I get home.

My answer is, "because it has to."

Posted on Oct 18, 2012 2:22:47 AM PDT
Why are Britain's military branches called the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Royal Air Force, but the army is called the British Army?
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  24
Total posts:  287
Initial post:  Aug 29, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 19, 2013

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