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The Science Fiction Forum Heartbeat Thread


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Posted on Feb 5, 2014 10:38:51 PM PST
This is kool, a thread to post anything on. Whell, here I go. This is funny; I've got the koolest spaceships on earth and nobody knows it.

Posted on Dec 27, 2013 4:42:39 AM PST
A remake of Westworld? I expect that will go down about as well as the remake of The Wicker Man.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2013 7:20:27 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 24, 2013 7:33:37 PM PST
Tom Rogers says:
Ha, if you drank your way through that to the Old Portrero, we may never see you again :)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 24, 2013 6:02:27 PM PST
Ronald Craig says:
(We found your cache of Romulan ale.)

Posted on Dec 23, 2013 6:14:25 PM PST
Tom Rogers says:
Anne, you stay here, I'm going to go down into the basement to see what happened to Bob, Ronald, Sailor, Gilbert and Mike.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 3, 2013 5:18:06 PM PDT
K. Rowley says:
I've also got the book for the Futureworld movie, but it is a novelization and Michael Crichton didn't do the book nor the screenplay.

Posted on Sep 3, 2013 5:09:22 PM PDT
Oops, so you did. Sorry I didn't catch that. Your review sounds like what I remember from reading this in high school.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 3, 2013 5:01:58 PM PDT
K. Rowley says:
"Yes. That book contains the screenplay, not a novel."

I know - I just dug up my copy and posted a review of it...

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 3, 2013 4:50:48 PM PDT
Yes. That book contains the screenplay, not a novel.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 3, 2013 2:34:44 PM PDT
K. Rowley says:
"I think Westworld was only ever written as a screenplay."

Westworld by Michael Crichton

Posted on Sep 3, 2013 11:44:14 AM PDT
I think Westworld was only ever written as a screenplay. Most of his later stuff was essentially screenplays in novel format, so I'm not sure the movies really qualify as adaptations. The original Andromeda Strain film was a close adaptation of the book, and is still the best of them. Maybe check out the 2008 AS mini-series before deciding if remakes are a good idea...

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 2, 2013 6:31:40 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Crichton's stuff is a natural target, with the exception of the Andromeda Strain, I can't think of a totally satisfactory translation of his work to the big (or little screen) though Jurassic Park, Westworld and Sphere aren't without their (sometimes considerable) charms.

Posted on Sep 2, 2013 6:22:41 PM PDT
LOL - spoke too soon: http://www.denofgeek.com/tv/westworld/27129/hbo-orders-westworld-remake-pilot-from-jj-abrams

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 2, 2013 2:31:39 PM PDT
Ronald Craig says:
Mmm... maybe. :)

Posted on Sep 2, 2013 12:04:07 AM PDT
Westworld, anyone?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 1, 2013 5:21:52 PM PDT
Ronald Craig says:
Hmm... thought about mailing them that, if they have a suggestions address? It might actually help Siffy regain some of the lost cachet of the Sci-Fi Channel. ;)

Posted on Sep 1, 2013 2:57:42 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Following our recent fun discussions of "Sharknado", it has occurred to me that a useful SFish thing the SyFy channel could do with their modestly budgeted original movies, is to remake some of the old movies that either haven't aged well or that didn't quite live up to their potential. So a couple movies I'd like to see updated and upscaled:

"Donovan's Brain"

"Laserblast"

"It Conquered The World"

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2013 9:29:48 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
I thought it was a fairly effective horror story, as you say the emphasis was on the gorror rather than the keying in on the scary elements of possession, eg the bizarre compulsions and transformation of the victim. Cameron didn't really follow through on the implications of the ghosts ability to hop into a new body after their original host was killed. Even a pretty bad SF/horror movie from ye good olde days would have done that, so when the heroes start blowing the energumens away, they would succumb to possession by the liberated ghosts and so on, which would force the surviving humans realize first that they had to incapacitate the zombies and then to come up with a sooper dooper Martian ghost catcher rationalized with a bit of science-ish jargon. But the story was fast enough, and distracting enough to keep me from focusing on its defects. It's weird that Cameron didn't do something more in keeping with the old SF b-movies or serials, he clearly knows the genres, he wasn't avoiding cliches because what he came up with could hardly have been more hackneyed. Anyway, I guess the moral of my windy sermon, Ronald, is that it's ok not to like "Ghosts of Mars"

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2013 3:44:19 PM PDT
Ronald Craig says:
I remember watching it in Japan on one of my satellite movie channels. I remember finding it pretty gory and the whole premise of humans being possessed by Martian ghosts struck me as pretty lame. Oh well.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2013 9:16:47 PM PDT
Fullme7al says:
Yeah it's been on starz for awhile now. That movie creeped me out as a kid. It's not that bad. the special effects are lame, especially when the girl gets decapitated by the buzz saw. Also Jason Statham has been bald for a long time while ice cube hasn't aged one bit.

Posted on Aug 27, 2013 6:34:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 27, 2013 9:30:25 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Once again, we are confronting the soporific beat of the doldrums. I watched "Ghosts of Mars" for the first time this last weekend--I thought it was pretty good, I would have liked an even more Rashomon narrative, but I enjoyed the flick. I am kindo sad that I was boycotting Cameron at the time. I don't normally obsess about such things, but I checked the budget and it seems to me that Jimmy C. could have done it for a lot less than the 30 million or so he spent, the effects were almost laughably lowfi, just barely superior to "Planet of the Vampires" and frankly not as spooky.

Posted on Mar 27, 2013 6:26:12 AM PDT
Larry Kelley says:
Tom: Now that IS funny. When I was in the USAF and living in base housing for Xmas I had a friend with some artistic leanings make me a door size poster of Santa Claus waving bye-bye till next year--while going down a toilet bowl! My wife wouldn't let me put it up. Probably would have got us kicked out of the housing-and maybe got me court-maritialed.

Posted on Mar 26, 2013 7:53:10 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 26, 2013 7:54:11 PM PDT
Tom Rogers says:
Have we seen this before? I do have a weakness for Alien humor:

http://www.blastr.com/sites/blastr/files/styles/blog_post_media/public/ImageoftheDayEasterBunnyFacehugger.jpg

Gilbert, you're the usual suspect, have you already posted this charming tableau?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 6, 2013 6:33:57 PM PST
Fullme7al says:
I've heard a lot about Armor as well, and Embedded. I've read the sample of Embedded and I'm leaning toward a purchase,

Posted on Jan 6, 2013 4:06:51 PM PST
Tom Rogers says:
Next up on the list: All You Need Is Kill I'm not a big military SF fan, but it looks like my kind of book (I finally read "Armor" because so many people raved about it).
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Discussion in:  Science Fiction forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  72
Initial post:  Nov 15, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 5, 2014

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